31 August 2012

Discover Nashville Public Library Video & other Genealogy Library PSA Videos



You may remember a piece earlier this year about the NY Public Library Milstein Suspense Trailer (a PSA).  Though not created with the same humorous intent, a PSA titled “Discover NPL Genealogy” gives a great look at this wonderful resource.

Just because we may not “physically” ever visit a place like the Nashville Public Library, does not mean that we can’t learn some neat things just by watching a video about it.

Several years ago, when I was researching a family with deep roots in Davidson County, I personally used the services of the Nashville Public Library via mail.  So, it was neat to “see” where the materials came from.  And, it reminded me of what I knew was held there and also introduced me to some materials that I hadn’t been aware of!  So, when I next research someone who lived in Nashville or Davidson county, I know where I will start!

Of course, being the curious genealogist that I am, I had to then see if YouTube had some other videos that might be similar in terms of introducing us to the genealogical materials held at a library.  I found these:


What others did you find?



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30 August 2012

National Genealogical Society Partners with Family Village Facebook Game to Help Players Build Family Tree



Players of Free Family History Facebook Game Now Have Access to a NGS Custom Tutorial

BIRMINGHAM, AL (30 August 2012) – Funium and the National Genealogical Society (NGS) today announced a partnership that will allow players of Family Village, Funium’s popular Facebook game, to further explore their family trees by accessing a number of NGS resources and research aids. The collaboration was announced at the Federation of Genealogical Societies 2012 Conference in Birmingham, Alabama.

In coordination with the announcement, NGS will launch a separate landing page on their website tailored entirely to Family Village players. Featuring a customized step-by-step guide complete with instructional videos, the page grants Family Village users free access to materials typically reserved for NGS members, including ancestor charts and family group sheets. Players will be guided on how to collect more information about their relatives and ancestors, complementing their progress in Family Village.

“We are thrilled to join forces with Funium,” said Jordan Jones, president-elect of NGS. “Introducing the Family Village audience to NGS’s resources aligns with our mission to help serve and grow the genealogical community. We are excited to be able to share our knowledge about family history with the Family Village players.”

On August 21, Funium officially opened Family Village to all Facebook users. In gameplay, players foster their own personalized virtual community by building businesses, houses, immigrating family members, and assigning jobs. Family Village encourages players to build a documented family tree and matches that data with relevant real-world documents about the users’ living and deceased relatives, including newspaper articles, census records, and other documents.

“This partnership significantly bolsters the real-world value of our game,” said Jeff Wells, CEO of Funium. “We created Family Village as a way to promote interest in family history with the end goal of players starting their own genealogical journey. With NGS on board, our players have some additional resources in their arsenal to further develop their family tree.”

To visit the NGS Family Village page, visit www.ngsgenealogy.org/fv. To play Family Village, visit http://familyvillagegame.com.

About National Genealogical Society

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

About Funium

Funium is an emerging leader in the creation of Facebook games with social value that produce real-world, useful content. Funium’s flagship game, Family Village, is the first Facebook game that enables players to explore their own family tree while building a virtual, online community. Through strategic partners, the game enables players to connect with billions of family history records using the Facebook platform. For more information on Family Village, visit www.familyvillagegame.com.




Contacts

NGS Board of Directors
Jordan Jones
919-809-9045

Funium Public Relations
Alex Koritz
801-461-9795







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29 August 2012

Genealogy Book Links


Sometimes it scares me how many neat resources I “stumble” upon!  It’s nice to think that one can logically and systematically keep up on the resources that can help us in our quest to learn more about our ancestors – and, that’s only a nice thought!  All too often I just “trip over” something that I wish I had known about earlier!

Genealogy Book Links is just such a website!  Though I have written about sources for digitized books for us genealogists (Google, FamilySearch Books (formerly BYU Family History Archives), HeritageQuest, Internet Archive, etc) and places like Cyndi’s list and Linkpendium which include references to digital books – it’s nice to find a site which is a “clearing house” across the various aforementioned and other sites.

Do recognize that as with any site attempting to compile information, it is not complete and sometimes the links don’t work (the bane of any genealogy site) and yet I love how the “links” for any found book reflects the source for the info.  

For example, under NC we find books from UNC (UNC Chapel Hill), ECU, Goo(gle), (Internet) Ar(chive), (Project) Gut(en berg) – places I am familiar with.  There are also books listed from some sources that have not typically been on the top of my NC research list such as Op(en)L(ibrary) and Harvard (Bernheim, Gotthardt Dellmann. History of the German settlements and of the Lutheran church in North and South Carolina :from the earliest period of the colonization of the Dutch, German, and Swiss settlers to the close of the first half of the present century. Philadelphia : The Lutheran Book Store, 1872. – also available via “Making of America”)

There is also a collection of Family Genealogies that you will want to check out.

Did you make a “find” here that really helped your research?  If so, please share!





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28 August 2012

Chris O'Dowd to star in Spinal Tap-style series on BBC -- Family Tree

Image from 2nd article referenced

The BBC has created a new 8 episode show, Family Tree, which will be broadcast in the US on HBO.

Here is a snippet from a published news item ...

Filmmaker Christopher Guest is bringing his humour to the small screen with a documentary-style comedy series for BBC Two.

Family Tree will feature Irish actor Chris O'Dowd, who starred in hit movie Bridesmaids and Channel 4's The IT Crowd.

The eight-part series is said to be in the same style as Guest's mockumentaries, such as the acclaimed This is Spinal Tap and Best in Show.

It will be broadcast in the US on HBO.

Family Tree follows the recently unemployed and single Tom Chadwick (O'Dowd) who looks into his ancestry after suffering an identity crisis...

Read the full article.

Another piece tells us a bit more ...

Having recently lost his job and girlfriend, Tom has a rather unsure sense of his own identity. But when he inherits a mysterious box of belongings from a great aunt that he never met, he starts investigating his family lineage and uncovers a whole world of unusual stories and characters and a growing sense of who he is and who his real family are.

Given the comic “chops” of those involved, it will be very interesting to see where this goes!

Are there other “comedic” looks at family research that you have watched?




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.

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27 August 2012

Girlsʼ names change 7 times more than boysʼ since 1940 Census

Source -- Social Security Administration (link in article)

I don’t come cross too many “young” Diane’s and I’m always pleasantly surprised when I come across anyone who share’s my name!  

My test of a forename’s popularity is whether you find it “printed” on merchandise when on vacation!  Fortunately or unfortunately for my children, we never find their names printed on anything.  Maybe I was a little too successful in giving them unique names!

This comes to mind because last month findmypast.com published a piece talking about baby names and their popularity as found in the 1940 census and today! Here is an abbreviated excerpt.

The most popular baby names for American girls at the time of the 1940 U.S. Census have changed since then seven times more than the top names for boys the same year, reveals a study by genealogy website, findmypast.com...

Findmypast.com researchers analyzed the records of the U.S. Social Security Administration, which has recorded American baby names since 1879... 

None of the top 10 girls' names in 1940 even make today's top 100, while seven of the top 10 boys' names do so and three (James, David, William) make the top 20.

"Baby names are like period pieces", says Josh Taylor, genealogist for findmypast.com. "Some recall a particular era, which can make them clues when researching family history."

Read the full PR piece.


Back to my name – Diane.  I visited the Social Security Administration (Baby Name Data) website to learn more about names and their popularity!  In the year I was born, my name was 19th in popularity and the list includes my husband’s name, my sister’s name, her husband’s name, etc.  So, we definitely seem to be a product of “our generation!”


And, how far my name has fallen!  For 2011, the name Diane is NOT in the top 1000 names, though the variant Diana is found in the 203rd spot!  I guess I’m more unique than I thought ....





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24 August 2012

New Voices of Genealogy Release: Henry B. Hoff, CG, FASG, FGBS “Becoming a Genealogist”




From guest editor, Arlene V. Jennings

The National Genealogical Society is pleased to announce the August celebration of the 100th anniversary of the NGSQ with the release of Henry B. Hoff’s story of “Becoming a Genealogist.”

One of five editors featured in the Voices of Genealogy series, Hoff is distinguished for his role in editing two of the nation’s leading genealogical journals. He served as trustee editor of The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record (with Harry Macy as associate editor) from 1986 to 1998 and as consulting editor from 1998 to 2001 (with Harry Macy as editor). In 2001 he became editor of the New England Historic Genealogical Register. His contributions to New York genealogy are enormous, particularly in his writings on Long Island families and early Dutch families in New York. He is noted also for his studies on families of the West Indies.

In recognition of his achievements, Henry B. Hoff was named a fellow of the American Society of Genealogists in 1979 and of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society in 1993. He first earned the certified genealogist credential in 1979.

Previous releases featuring important editors of genealogical journals and now playing at the NGS website (http://www.ngsgenealogy.org) are John Frederick Dorman, CG (Emeritus), FASG, FNGS, FVGS (The Virginia Genealogist); David L. Greene, Ph.D., FASG, (The American Genealogist); Harry Macy, FASG, FGBS (The NYG&B Record); and George Ely Russell, CG, FASG, FNGS (The National Genealogical Society Quarterly).  

The video was produced by award winning filmmakers Kate Geis and Allen Moore from an interview by Melinde Lutz Byrne, CG, FASG, co-editor of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly. Henry B. Hoff, CG, FASG, FGBS, “Becoming a Genealogist,” is now playing for all NGS members at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org. Just log on and follow the link from the home page.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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23 August 2012

The Dictionary of Quaker Genealogy Terms & Phrases

Image Source: 
http://www.fwccamericas.org/publications/images/fwcc_map_2007_sm.gif

Whether your ancestors were Quaker or not, understanding Quaker genealogy terms and phrases, is important to your research.  Quakers did not just interact with one another or conduct business just in their own communities. This means that if your ancestors lived near Quaker settlements, you might find this dictionary helpful.


In North Carolina, one often finds Quaker “dates” in deeds and other records and such “dating” is a great clue about religious affiliation.

Have you had a situation where Quaker records helped you with your non-Quaker ancestors?



Editor’s note: Thanks to the GenealogyBlog for letting us know about this resource.

Editor’s note: The Friends Historical Library, located on the campus of Swarthmore College also has some great resources relevant to genealogical research. I noticed a link to Quakers & Slavery and found this a fascinating website.








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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.

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22 August 2012

Save $100 on RootsTech 2013 with Exclusive Insider Early Registration



NGS is pleased to once again be a sponsor of RootsTech, to be held this year on 21–23 March 2013 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Members of NGS can take advantage of an exclusive early registration that offers a $100 savings off the full three-day conference pass price. This offer is for a limited time, from 29 August–2 September 2012, before registration officially opens to the public. The exclusive insider price is only $119 (the regular price is $219).

RootsTech is a fast-growing conference with a unique emphasis on helping individuals learn and use the latest technology to get started or to accelerate their efforts to find, organize, preserve, and share their family’s connections and history. In its third year, RootsTech 2013 will offer many new and exciting resources for genealogists and family historians of all skill levels. Join the thousands of attendees and experience RootsTech 2013:
·      More Classes, More Speakers: Great new sessions and more hands-on workshops to attend.
·      40% Bigger Expo Hall: Exciting new exhibitors with great products and services for you to discover.
·      New! Getting Started Track: All the basics and lots of help for beginners to jumpstart their family research.
·      Developer Day: Consolidated track specifically designed for technology developers.

To take advantage of this limited-time offer, which is available from 29 August–2 September, go to http://rootstech.org/insider, click on the registration button, and be sure to enter the promo code NGS119.

For more information about RootsTech 2013, visit http://rootstech.org/. Full conference schedules can be viewed during the registration process.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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21 August 2012

Conserving Newspapers by Washing ?!?!?

Image as appeared with original article

Conservation and preservation of long-ago created documents and objects is an ongoing challenge and of great importance to genealogists and family historians.

I don’t know about you, and I would never have thought that one might “wash” old newspapers as part of such a process.  My immediate thought was that the newspaper would disintegrate!  And, apparently, when you have the right people with the right know how – that doesn’t happen!

Last month in The Courier.co.uk, the article ‘It might look a bit scary’ – first edition of The Dundee Courier cleaned up for the future’ starts out with ...

The first edition of The Dundee Courier appeared in 1816 — and an original copy still exists in the D. C. Thomson archives. Helen Brown spoke to conservator Emma Fraser about preserving this rare piece of newspaper memorabilia.

Watching someone handle fragile, friable, almost 200-year-old paper is actually quite frightening for the onlooker. Especially when it is being submerged — albeit VERY gently — in a trough of water. You expect it to disintegrate before your eyes.

But such things hold no fears for book and paper conservator Emma Fraser, who has been working on an original copy of the first Courier from 196 years ago at our Meadowside offices...

Read the full article and learn all about how this edition of the newspaper was “washed!”





Editor’s Note: Thanks to British Genes for bringing this to our attention.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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20 August 2012

Mormon Migration Index




It never ceases to amaze me how many previously-unknown-to-me genealogy research resources I can stumble across in any given day!

A recent find is the Mormon Migration Index.  We all know the challenges of trying to get our ancestors documented as they “crossed the pond.”

The journey to Zion often began with an ocean voyage. Crossing the ocean in the 19th century was difficult, expensive, and often dangerous. It also marked a dramatic turning point in the lives of early Latter-day saint converts who left their homelands and sailed for America. Discover stories, letters, journal entries, and other accounts of their voyage.

On this site you can you can search through personal accounts, passenger lists and logs. The database includes thousands of passenger records, stories, journal entries, scanned registry images, and other information.  Recognize that this is a work in progress and so do check back often for additions.

Besides searching for your ancestor on ships lists etc, you can also learn the history of 19th century Mormon Migration by reading posted articles.

Though I do not have any Mormon ancestors, I was curious to see if the database included any entries from Oldham, Lancashire, England and it does! Here is a snippet of the listed entries.



Did you “find” something new to you in this database?




Thanks for Leland Meitzler for posting about this great resource.




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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17 August 2012

This Fall NARA Opens a New Location in New York City



Last month it was announced by The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) a fall 2012 opening of the new location for the National Archives at New York City—the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House at One Bowling Green in Lower Manhattan.

“This exciting new venture will bring the records of American history to life through exhibitions, educational and research opportunities, an expanded research room, and public programs for hundreds of thousands of new visitors each year. We are thrilled to bring the National Archives to New York City – a location close to my heart” said Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero, who formerly served as Director of the New York Public Libraries.

The National Archives’ New York research facility was on Varick Street in Greenwich Village for 20 years. The new location at the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House will provide greater visibility and accessibility to the important Federal records originating in New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It will allow the Archives to expand its research functions in New York and create a new educational destination in a building that already welcomes museum visitors through the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. The new educational spaces and exhibitions are made possible by a public-private partnership between the National Archives and the Foundation for the National Archives.

Components of the National Archives at New York City, all free and open to the public, will include:

·    A Welcome Center to introduce visitors to the National Archives and the depth and diversity of Federal records. The Center will feature a small exhibition gallery with a changing selection of original documents from the National Archives, in addition to an opening exhibition in the grand rotunda of the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House.
·    A Research Center for scholars, genealogists, and the general public to conduct their own research using original records and microfilm holdings with the assistance of professional archivists. Researchers will have free access to resources including online subscription services such as Ancestry, Fold3, Heritage Quest, and ProQuest.
·    A Learning Center to welcome school groups and families and to encourage them to explore National Archives records through workshops, school programs, online access, “Archival Adventures,” and more.
·    Exhibitions in the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House Rotunda featuring holdings from the Archives. The opening exhibition, “The World’s Port: Through Documents of the National Archives,” opens September 21, 2012, and runs through November 25, 2012.
·    Public Programs in the Welcome, Research and Learning Centers and in the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House’s 300-seat theater and lecture halls to highlight the nation’s history and New York’s special role in shaping the nation. Outreach programs will increase awareness of National Archives resources in New York and nationwide.





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