30 April 2014

TODAY is the LAST Day to Sign up for NGS 2014 Family History Conference LIVE Streaming -- Deadline is MIDNIGHT EDT!



Last day to sign up to watch ‪#‎NGS2014GEN live or access recorded session for three months after is today!

Can’t make it to the NGS 2014 Family History Conference? You can still catch two of our tracks from the comfort of your home or office! NGS will stream these tracks live as it happens and you will continue to have access for three months from the end of the conference.

All events are taking place 8-10 May 2014 in Richmond, Virginia (Eastern Standard Time) for the NGS 2014 Family History Conference. Times are posted in Eastern Daylight Standard Time Zone
format, please adjust viewing time.

Registration deadline for Live Streaming access is 30 April 2014 at midnight. Instructions on how to access the live streaming will be emailed to all registered attendees by 6 May 2014. All registrants will receive an electronic version of the NGS 2014 Family History Conference Syllabus. Registration is discounted for NGS Members.

Cancellation Policy
All sales are final and cannot be cancelled.

Pricing Details
Type
Includes Formats
Member
Non-Member

Track One or Track Two
Live Streaming + 3 month access to stream files
$65
$80
Bundled PackageTrack One and Track Two
Live Streaming + 3 month access to stream files
$115
$145

Track Details

Track One: Records and Research Techniques
Join the conference from home and learn about best practices and research sources from nationally known experts
Thursday, 8 May 2014
2:30 p.m. T241 – Using Evidence Creatively: Spotting Clues in Run-of-the-Mill Records, Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS
4:00 p.m. T252 – Can a Complex Research Problem Be Solved Solely Online?, Thomas W. Jones, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS
Friday, 9 May 2014
8:00 a.m. F308 – Using NARA’s Finding Aids and Website, Pamela Boyer Sayre, CG, CGL
9:30 a.m. F311 – Disputes and Unhappy Differences: Surprises in Land Records, Sharon Tate Moody, CG
11:00 a.m. F321 – “Of Sound Mind and Healthy Body”: Using Probate Records in Your Research, Michael Hait, CG

Track Two: Virginia Resources and Migration Patterns
Join us for Track Two: Virginia Resources and Migration Patterns which focuses on learning
about Virginia’s records and her people, who moved south and west to new lands pushing the frontier ever forward.
Friday, 9 May 2014
2:30 p.m. F342 – From Ulster to Virginia and the Carolinas, David E. Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA
4:00 p.m. F355 – Researching a Civil War Soldier in Virginia, Craig Roberts Scott, CG
Saturday, 10 May 2014
8:00 a.m. S403 – The Migration Triangle: Virginia, the Carolinas, and Tennessee, J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA
9:30 a.m. S415 – A Treasure Trove of Rarely Used Records, Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FVGS
11:00 a.m. S425 – Colonial Migrations In and Out of the Shenandoah Valley, Vic Dunn, CG

Additional Information
Once registered, you can watch the event live, or if you have other commitments on those dates, you can view the sessions as many times as you want for ninety days following the conference (through 10 August 2014). NGS has selected PlayBackNow to broadcast the live sessions and to provide the recorded sessions for later viewing. Instructions for viewing the live streaming will be sent to registrants before 6 May 2014.




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Newest Edition of NGS Magazine Available to NGS Members Now!



The Apr/May/June 2014 issue of the NGS Magazine (PDF 3.8MB) is now online in the Members Only section of the website.

Features
NGS 2015 Family History Conference, by Janet L. Powell
Where will the field of genealogy be in 2024?, by David E. Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA
Connecting your genes at the Burton Historical Collection, by Dara Tolbert Brooks
Using high school world history to ignite interest in genealogical research, by Sharon Kelley
Finding American women’s voices through the centuries, by Jane E. Wilcox
Women homesteaders, by Gail Blankenau
Using Autosomal DNA for genealogy, by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL


Columns
National Archives, by Claire Prechtel-Kluskens
Reference desk, by Kathy Petlewski, MSLS
Review, by Barbara Schenck
Technology, by Jordan Jones

Departments
President’s message, by Jordan Jones
Editor’s corner, by Elizabeth Kelley Kerstens, CG
NGS/Genealogy news



Editor’s Note: Please note that online access to the NGS Quarterly and NGS Magazine are available only as long as your membership is active. If you wish to discontinue this option and continue to receive print copies of the journal, please with our website and update your profile to indicate the same.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com


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29 April 2014

Are Social Networks (e.g. FB, Twitter), falling apart? If so, what does that mean for family historians?



The internet has really revolutionized how we do genealogy – whether facilitating our research or putting us in touch with cousins.

On top of that, social media such as Facebook (and Twitter) have expanded the ways in which we can “connect” with possibly cousins!  The more people we can link to as we research our ancestors, the more pieces of the “puzzle” we might have access to.

I mention this as there was an article published on Computerworld, Why the social networks are falling apart, which makes me wonder is this prophecy good or bad for genealogists?  I am kind of leaning toward the latter.

As my husband and I discussed, this phenomenon is good for entrepreneurs as it results in “room to create new social media platforms.  They won’t be absorbed by the borg, except from an advertizing platform perspective.”

On the other hand, for family researchers won’t this create a world where there are “more places for “us” as consumers to have to spread ourselves “thinner” in more place to connect with others?”  It seems that the some centralization, such as via a Facebook platform, has benefited us as a wonderful opportunity to find cousins, those researching the same geographic locale, etc.  If an increasing number of social platforms are created, won’t it be that much harder for us to “connect” to anyone as each platform will represent a possibly shrinking subset of those doing family research?

What do you think?  Assuming that social networks are falling apart, are genealogists winners and losers?


Editor’s Note: If you don’t get the “borg” reference, you probably haven’t watched Star Trek.  The line we always reference in our family is “resistance is futile.”




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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28 April 2014

If you live in PA, NY, KS or VT -- did you know that you can FREELY access some of the records of your state in Ancestry.com?



Do you know that certain states have worked arrangements with Ancestry.com to digitize their records?

Do you know that as part of some of those agreements in-state residents can access those records on Ancestry.com for free?

I learned about this when Tim Gruber, Pahr-Access, sent an e-mail to Jan Alpert (past President of NGS) to let NGS know that the initial batch of Pennsylvania state death certificates (1906-1924) is now online through Ancestry.com with more to follow.

This e-mail also mentioned ...

Pennsylvania residents (and only Pennsylvania residents) have free access to this particular database as they do with other Pennsylvania State Archives records already scanned and made available online by Ancestry. Free access for Pennsylvania residents is accomplished by registering online at no cost or obligation through this link (please be sure to read the instructions carefully): http://www.portal.state.pa.us/. Pennsylvania residents who already have a subscription to Ancestry do not need to do anything as long as they continue to have a subscription to Ancestry.

If PA has this arrangement, might other states?  I did some searching and I can see that NY, KS and VT definitely have similar arrangements.


This really is a win-win-win.  States benefit from Ancestry.com and its ability to digitize large quantities of materials easily, residents and others benefit from these records becoming more readily available and Ancestry.com benefits from expanded offerings that attract more members.

Do recognize that these agreements only cover “some” of the records that Ancestry.com is digitizing for these states.  As a local resident, you do not gain access to “all” the databases for your state available via Ancestry.com.  Each state manages the access differently (state run portal, Ancestry.com portal, or one time access mechanism), so please do visit the links above to learn the details for your particular state.

Does your state have a similar arrangement with Ancestry.com?  Please let us know?


Editor’s Note:  For any of the records which are part of the aforementioned agreements between these states and Ancestry.com, if you live out of state, you will need a subscription to Ancestry.com to access these databases.  Though, many libraries and other facilities subscribe to Ancestry.com and provide free access to their patrons.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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25 April 2014

Upfront Mini Bytes – Philadelphia, Irish Research, Vita Brevis, Portuguese Archives, Colorized Photographs, FIBIS, and Boston Immigrants

Welcome to our newest edition of our bi-weekly feature Upfront Mini Bytes.  In Upfront Mini Bytes we provide eight tasty bits of genealogy news that will help give you a deeper byte into your family history research. Each item is short and sweet.  We encourage you to check out the links to articles, blog posts, resources, and anything genealogical!

We hope you found the past editions helpful.  Use your favorite search engine with “Upfront with NGS” “Mini Bytes” or use this Google search link.

Do you have questions, suggestions for future posts, or comments?  Please post a comment or send an e-mail to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Did you know that there is something called Library Company of Philadelphia? The Library Company of Philadelphia is an independent research library specializing in American history and culture from the 17th through the 19th centuries.  Open to the public free of charge, the Library Company houses an extensive collection of rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art.  I learned about it through its Flickr page
.
Ireland’s Memorial Records are now digitized and online via the Flanders Fields Museum project website. These records represent the 49,000 names published in 1923 by The Committee of the Irish National War Memorial and were originally alphabetically listed in eight leather bound volumes.

AmericanAncestors.org (aka New England Historic Genealogical Society, NEHGS) has a new blog, Vita Brevis designed to offer the reader short essays by the Society’s expert staff on their own research as well as news of the greater genealogical community.

Dick Eastman (EOGN) brought to our attention that there is a new website, Tombo, with Information about 20+ District Archive Sites in Portugal. The website is mostly in Portuguese and you can select an English interface, though recognize that any records mentioned are listed in Portuguese.

Colorized historic photos are just mesmerizing. Check out a video, Brief Moments in History, to see some stunning images of what these photos might have looked like had color photography been invented and in wide-spread use.

Families in British India Society (FIBIS) has a new database, St. Helena, South Atlantic – Banns of Marriage 1849-1924. Check out the full holdings of the FIBIS database here.

The MapLab of WIRED ran a piece, Maps Reveal How Immigration Transformed Boston’s Neighborhoods. A new exhibit at the Boston Public Library uses maps, modern and historic photos, and census data to illustrate how waves of immigration shaped the city and its individual neighborhoods in the 20th century — and continue to shape them today.

Another Irish research resource! How to trace your Ancestors in County Monaghan (Ireland) is a free guide that discusses the many records available to genealogical researchers.










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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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24 April 2014

Thomas W Jones, CG, FASG, author of Mastering Genealogical Proof guest on Fieldstone Common



Last week, Marian Pierre-Louis interviewed Thomas W Jones, CG, FASG, on her internet radio show Fieldstone Common about his book Mastering Genealogical Proof.

Besides a link to the podcast (look below all the various social media share buttons), the webpage associated with the interview gives a biography of Thomas, gives a summary and publication information for the book, a summary of the interview and links mentioned during the interview, and additional information.

It’s a nice way to hear the author talk about this book as he shares some insights into “how to formulate questions, the process of analysis and correlation and what to do when there are evidence conflicts. He even discusses how to approach citations so they are not so scary!

For more information about the book and how to order this book, visit this NGS publications webpage.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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23 April 2014

Do-it-yourself book scanner preserving Pittstown PA history one page at a time!


It’s amazing what one or two or a small group of people can do when a passion of theirs will benefit many.

A recent example of this that I read about, Book scanner preserves volumes of history (thetimes-tribune.com) caught my eye since it’s based on one person working with the local historical society and the city to use a “do-it-yourself” version of a scanning apparatus to digitize that cities history.

He opens whichever book he is working on that day to the proper page, places it in a cradle, and lowers a V-shaped plastic panel to keep the page in place. He pushes his foot against a black pedal, and two Canon digital cameras fire simultaneously, recording the yellowing, faded page in a digital image.

Digitization efforts are most often stymied by a lack of funds which can be compounded by a lack of personnel to carry out such.  In this case, a cost-effective process (this particular apparatus was built pro bono though it was based on a do-it-yourself idea), combined with a dedicated volunteer and a cooperating historical society and city government “are” preserving Pittston’s history. Over 30 books out of 150 have already been digitized.

Unfortunately, as we often hear about and learn, some of our history is disappearing even as I write this.

The left wall of City Hall's archive room is empty - Mr. Hines said water damage from a leaky ceiling once destroyed volumes of records, turning them to "black dust."

Might this be an option in your community?  Has your community participated in a similar effort?




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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22 April 2014

Libraries are AWESOME -- are you taking advantage of all that your library (and the library in a locale you are researching) have to offer?

source: Google image collection of libraries
As a recent article states – Libraries are AWESOME!  Read the article Libraries are Surprisingly Popular, and Oh Yeah, They Also Make You Awesome.  I found it neat that one of the conclusions drawn has to do with finding and processing information (doesn’t that sound like what we genealogists do constantly?!?!)

LIBRARIES ARE MORE RELEVANT THAN EVER
Maybe the most surprising data point to emerge from the Pew Research study is that most library users are technologically engaged. That may sound counter-intuitive, but the truth is that in the age of information, places where information can be organized and contextualized are key.

Take a few minutes and jot down what your local library does for you and then you as a genealogist and family historian.  I quickly came up with this “short” list (not meant to be comprehensive and what do you expect when I spent about 30 seconds creating it).

·    Access to Interlibrary loan (ILL)
·    Remote access to electronic databases
·    On-site access to specialized electronic databases
·    Availability of books, journals, newspapers and more
·    Ability to order and then view Familysearch microfilm
·    Access to local manuscript and related resources (in person or via research requests)
·    Access to digitized collections, indexes, finding aids for local history resources 
·    Insights from a professional who specializes in information acquisition and interpretation
·    Options to attend programs – historical, genealogical, skills acquisition and much more
·    Many more services that benefit genealogists at your local library.

Whenever I research a new-to-me locale, I always check out the local library, nearest college library and then state library -- they all have so much to offer!  

As already stated libraries are awesome!

What makes your local library awesome for local genealogists and family historians?





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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21 April 2014

SimilarSiteCheck -- a neat & sometimes useful search tool and not just for genealogical research!


Search, search, search ... we are always searching for new information and sources.

We do much searching on the internet.  You may use Google, Mocavo, or any of a myriad of other search engines as we ferret out the genealogical gems to be found in the online and offline worlds.  We frequently run into duplicated information, “hits” completely unrelated to what we seek, spam websites and much more.  We are always seeking “better” ways to search the internet for what’s valuable to us.

ResearchBuzz introduced me to a site called SimilarSiteCheck.

“In order to find similar websites for a given domain Similarsitecheck analyzes the entire content as well as external links for the webpage. During the analysis we collect the most important keywords and phrases for a webpage. To actually calculate the alternative websites we search for the found keywords and phrases in our database, compare the sites and get a similarity score for the domains.”

What a neat idea. Any tool that might improve the efficiency and effectiveness of doing online searches gets a thumbs up from me. This website is German-based with an interface in either English or German.

It’s incredibly easy to use.  You enter the URL for a website of interest and then click the arrow.  The results are returned below.

Do know that for some websites, I did run into issues.  I tried the websites for both the State Library of North Carolina and the State Archives of North Carolina and the site seemed unable to handle these. I would get messages of “invalid domain.”  I also tried the Library of Congress website with the same issues.  It might be that government entity website platforms just are not compatible.

I then tried www.familysearch.org and it gave a result of 49 similar webpages.  Possibly because it is German-based, the results seemed skewed to a lot of UK websites.  It might also be language usage – are the terms family history et al used less on US websites?

I then entered the URL for New River Notes (a regional NC/VA website) and the results were kind of all over the place as you can see from this image.  Though I might want to rend a cottage or condominium, those are not websites that will help my genealogy research.  I tried a few other searches and received equally entertaining and eclectic mixes of suggested websites.



So, as with many tools, it might not be helpful.  On the other hand, if it guides you to just one “new-to-you” website with valuable information, then it’s helped.

When you play around with it, let us know if it guided you to a website which is new to you and relevant.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com


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