23 July 2014

SC "Digitization in a Box" program is a boon to family historians -- What is your state doing to help local communities digitally preserve invaluable content?


We all love digitization projects.  Often, a hurdle to such projects for a community (government, library, archives, etc) is a lack of money and/or know how to make such a project happen.

Well, SC is one state doing something about that !  As reported in SC libraries get help putting historic materials online

The South Carolina State Library is offering Digitization in a Box to the state's libraries to put their historic photos and documents online.

"Almost every public library in South Carolina has their own local history collection, their own South Carolina room, or someone who as donated photographs or other historical information about their community," said Digital Project Supervisor Amanda Stone. "A lot of times these small public libraries don't have the expertise to do anything with them."

Stone oversees the program, which provides the library with the equipment, software, and expertise to scan the documents and put them online so they are easy to find. Libraries get the service for two months, with an option for a third month.

This is a really great resource for SC libraries.  Read more about “Digitization in a Box.”

Are you aware of similar projects run by other states?

I see where Indiana has a grant program for libraries and cultural institutions to digitize and preserve Indiana history.

Additionally, state libraries can apply for and benefit from the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) which dispenses funds that can be used for digitization efforts such as the Evansville, Wisconsin Digitization Project.  Here is a page about such grants as issued in NC for digitization (as well as other needs). There is a list on the Texas State Library and Archives Commission Page, Funding for Library Digitization Projects which talks about Federal, Private and TX-based foundation funding options.

Basically, most local libraries, archives, cultural institutions, etc, do not have the expertise nor funds to digitize their invaluable contents.  Any program that can provide funding or technical support to local initiatives benefits us all.






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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22 July 2014

WDYTYA is not just a US or UK Phenomenon ....


Tomorrow is a night that many have been waiting for, the start of the 5th season of Who Do You Think You Are?

I’ve always known about the UK version of the show, upon which the US version is based, and it got me curious to know if there are other versions.

The answer is YES.  The Wikipedia page for the UK version, has a list of international versions.  Who knows, maybe one of your ancestral lines has been a subject presented on one of these other verions.

Country
Local Name
Network
Air Dates
January 2008
11 October 2007 – 31 January 2008
Qui êtes-vous?
8 November 2013
9 January 2013
Ved du hvem du er?
15 September 2010 – 17 March 2012
Kuka oikein olet?
9 January 2012
31 March 2008 –
15 September 2008 – present
Mi Ata Hoshev She'ata
4 February 2010
Verborgen verleden
29 September 2010 – 2 March 2013
Hvem tror du at du er
January 2011
Sekrety rodzinne
November 2006 – March 2007
Quem É que Tu Pensas Que És?
15 January 2013
Моя родословная
1 July 2009 – 12 February 2011
Who Do You Think You Are?
31 May 2009
Spring 2009
NBC (2010-2012)
TLC (2013-present)
5 March 2010 – present


Have you watched any of the non-US or UK versions?  What did you think?



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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21 July 2014

Newest Edition of NGS Magazine (July/Aug/Sept 2014) Available to NGS Members Now!



The July/Aug/Sept 2014 issue of the NGS Magazine (PDF 5.3MB) is now online in the Members Only section of the website.

Features
NGS awards, competitions, and recognition, by Charles S. Mason Jr., CG
NGS Hall of Fame Inductee
New Corps of Discovery: NGS 2015 Family History Conference, by Janet L Powell
No federal pension file for a Pennsylvania Revolutionary War soldier?, by Sharon Cook MacInnes, PhD
The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (and Navies), by Diane Florence Gravel, CG
Border state divided families during the Civil War, by Rebecca Rector, MLS
Rich, poor, and all the rest: Why class matters to genealogists, by Stefani Evans, CG
Black sheep ancestors and their records, by C. Ann Staley, CG, CGL

Columns
National Archives, by Marie Varrelman Melchiori, CG, CGL, and Claire Prechtel-Kluskens
Reference desk, by Kathy Petlewski, MSLS
DNA basics, by Debbie Parke Wayne, CG, CGL
Technology, by Jordan Jones

Departments
President’s message, by Jordan Jones
Editor’s corner, by Elizabeth Kelley Kerstens, CG
NGS/Genealogy news




Editor’s Note: Please note that online access to the NGS Quarterly and NGS Magazine are available only as long as your membership is active. NGS Members can access the NGS Magazine archives (2005-present).



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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18 July 2014

Now Available -- June 2014 Edition of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly


Volume 102, Number 2 of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly is now available online in the Members Only section of the website.

Feature Articles
+ Why and How did Philippina Kicherer Immigrate to Jefferson County, Pennsylvania?, by Judy Kellar Fox, CG
+ Jane Fife’s Mother: Elizabeth (Sowersby) Stather Fife Hought, by Arlene V. Jennings, CG
+ Testing Family Lore to Determine the Parentage of Samuel W. Boren of Pittsburgh, by Harold Henderson, CG
+ Using Networks to Backtrack the Migration and Identify the Parents of Jacob Wynkoop of Morgan County, Ohio, by Stephen B. Hatton
+ Testing the FAN Principle against DNA: Zilphy (Watts) Price Cooksey Cooksey of Georgia and Mississippi, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FNGS, FASG


and other regular features ...



Editor’s Note: Please note that online access to the NGS Quarterly (NGSQ) and NGS Magazine are available only as long as your membership is active. You can access the NGSQ archive – the index is available for FREE and as a member you can access archives encompassing 1970, 1972–74, 1976, 1978–current.


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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17 July 2014

FREE Access to Fold3 Revolutionary War Collections Through End of Month


If you are researching Revolutionary War era ancestors, you can check out the Revolutionary War collections at Fold3 for FREE through the end of this month (31 July 2014).  Read more at Access the Revolutionary War Collection

If you have Revolutionary War ancestors, you might find them in the Revolutionary War pension files, service records, war rolls, or payment vouchers, or in the Revolutionary War Manuscript File. If you’re interested in the historical aspects of the war, you can explore the captured vessels prize cases, Revolutionary War milestone documents, Pennsylvania Archives, Constitutional Convention records, and the papers and letters of the Continental Congress, among others.

If you make an exciting find, please share !





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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16 July 2014

Plank Roads and Wagon Roads -- many of the roads our ancestors used have disappeared ...




Roads now are quite different than they were when our ancestors lived – think relatively narrow dirt paths!  This came to mind since a couple of weeks ago I read two articles. The first was: Forging West; The Western Turnpike and the Western North Carolina Railroad Company

As droves of Tar Heels take to the road this summer in search of cool North Carolina mountain air, we are thinking about what this trip would have been like 150 years ago. As it turns out, it would have likely meant traveling on a plank road. Think of a plank road as a wooden highway for wagons and coaches. In the mid 1800s, North Carolina had a proliferation of plank road building.

This rang a bell for me since on Sunday as I drove along I-85 in southern VA, I came across Boydton Plank Road.  It took many trips and seeing its name before I realized that this meant that historically this road had literally been constructed of planks. 

Of course, this got me interested in Plank Roads in NC, where I live.  I came across these articles that tell us about a type of road which really no longer exists as we travel modern roads.

+ Plank Roads (NC) 
+ Back in Time, Plank Roads (US Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration)
+ Plank Roads (Beaufort County)

To see how popular plank roads were in NC, just check out The Laws of North-Carolina, Enacted in the Year 1853 which lists almost 2 pages of incorporations by plank road companies such as the Ashboro’ and Salisbury Plank Road Company, Caswell Plank Road Company, Concord and Anson Plank Road Company, Duplin Plank Road Company, Haywood and Pittsboro Plank Road Company, and many more.


Do you know of any plank roads still in existence and used?


The Great Wagon Road served as the backbone to mold the history of North Carolina. What began as a hunting trail used by Native Americans expanded into one of the most widely used colonial highways in the nation. Taverns were also built along the primitive road to serve as rest stops for weary travelers and to provide food and shelter from the exhausting trip. The Great Wagon Road played a major role in the economic development of NC and paved the way for many modern towns and cities now known as Winston-Salem, Salisbury, & Charlotte.

Most of this road has been buried under concrete or disappeared from the landscape and yet it was such a critical pathway of travel into NC and beyond.  As is often said, many of our current roads are based on historic Native American hunting trails which themselves were based on animal paths.  We’ve just changed these small paths into large, wide, noisy and fast highways.

Both of these articles talked about key modes of travel for our ancestors that have all but disappeared today.  Understanding “how” our ancestors got from place to place, helps give us perspective on their lives.  

As you see travel the roads this summer, think of how your ancestors traveled.  When you see a descriptive road name, make a note to yourself to learn more about its history.  We know there has to be a story behind these interesting road names!



Editor’s Note:  Not directly related and on the same trip along I-85, I always see Squirrel Level Road in Colonial Heights VA.  I always wonder if the road was placed at “squirrel” level or what?!?!  Weird image and what else does one think of when driving!  On a more serious note, I do wonder at the “history” of the name as that has relevance to the history of the area and to those who lived there.  Without knowing history, we genealogists would often be “up a creek without a paddle,” in terms of correctly understanding records or even knowing where to look for them. 

BTW, if you happen to know the history of Squirrel Level Road, I would love to hear from you.


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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