30 November 2015

Registration Opens Tomorrow for the 2016 NGS Family History Conference


Registration opens tomorrow on Tuesday, 1 December 2015 for the National Genealogical Society’s thirty-eighth annual family history conference, Exploring the Centuries: Footprints in Time, which will be held 4–7 May 2016 at the Greater Ft. Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Conference highlights include a choice of more than 180 lectures given by nationally known speakers and subject matter experts on a broad array of topics. The conference will open with “Ordinary” People, Extraordinary Lives given by Connie L. Lester, Ph.D., Associate Professor in History, University of Central Florida; editor Florida Historical Quarterly; Director, RICHES of Central Florida.

Continuing NGS’s goal of providing quality educational opportunities to its participants, the lectures will cover a wide range of local, regional, and general genealogy topics which will help you build a solid foundation for your family history, fine-tune your research skills, and refine your methodology. Lecture topics covered at the conference will include: Across the Pond, African American, British Isles, Cemeteries, Changing Places, Context, Courthouse Research, DNA, Florida, Florida Military, Gulf Coast and Caribbean, Internet and Technology, Jewish, Land Records, Methods for Success, Military, New York Research, Organizing and Planning, Resources and Repositories, Sharing Your Research Stories, Starting Off, State Research, Tips and Techniques, and Women. The Board for Certification of Genealogists’ Skillbuilding track will again be an integral part of the conference and presented over the four days of the event.

To register online, visit the NGS website at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/register and complete the registration form. Register early to assure your choices to attend special events, workshops and luncheons.  
                                                                     
The online searchable program is available at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/program/ and the PDF brochure is available at http://goo.gl/w40zSO. The brochure includes an overview of the sessions, tours, pre-conference events, registration times, and rates, as well as general conference and hotel details. Attendees are urged to visit the conference blog at conferenceblog.ngsgenealogy.org, which will feature tips on local and regional research facilities as well as things to do in and around Ft. Lauderdale and updated information on hotel availability and local restaurants.


Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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25 November 2015

It's not too late for NGS members to gift themselves a FREE Findmypast Subscription (Restrictions Apply)


NGS members give yourself a gift this holiday season by redeeming or extending your subscription to the US and Canada collection of Findmypast, a leading provider of genealogical records.

Through a special offer, NGS members will have access to the Findmypast U.S. and Canada collection at no cost for one year (a $99.50 value). As a bonus, members can upgrade their free accounts to the Findmypast World collection (a $199.50 value) for only $89. Members who take advantage of this offer will receive Findmypast World at a 55% discount while also supporting NGS.

These offers apply to new or current Findmypast members. Details on how to upgrade will be sent once the U.S. and Canada subscription has been redeemed.

Findmypast has an ever-expanding collection of more than two billion historical records from around the world. The site includes U.S. census records, newspapers, the largest online collection of Irish records, and military records from the Revolutionary War through World War II. For additional information and to redeem this offer, visit the 
NGS website.

Not a member of the National Genealogical Society, please consider a membership for yourself or a gift for the family historian in your family. More information is available at  http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/individual_member_benefits




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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24 November 2015

Deadline for NGS Awards and Competitions Approaching (15 December 2015)


Each year, the National Genealogical Society recognizes excellence in genealogical scholarship through its various competitions and awards. The deadline for six of the competition entries and award nominations—December 15—is quickly approaching. NGS encourages its members, member societies, and other organizations to review the requirements and make entries and submissions. Winners will be recognized at the NGS 2016 Family History Conference in Fort Lauderdale, Florida:

The following NGS awards and competitions have a deadline of December 15:

  • Family History Writing Contest: NGS recognizes the best genealogy covering 3 to 4 generations.
  • Award for Excellence—Genealogy and Family History: NGS presents this award to an individual or nonprofit organization for an outstanding genealogy or family history book published during the past three years.
  • Award for Excellence—Genealogical Methods and Sources: NGS presents this award to an individual or nonprofit organization for a book, article, or series of articles published during the past three years on genealogical methods and sources.
  • Newsletter Competition: NGS recognizes the best genealogical society, historical society, and/or family association newsletters. The competition has two categories: one for major societies (with distribution of 500 or more copies of each issue) and one for local societies (with distribution of less than 500 copies of each issue).
  • John T. Humphrey Scholarship: John T. Humphrey served NGS in a number of positions over the years, including education manager. The Society has renamed the Home Study Course Scholarship in his honor. The award is given annually to an individual who has demonstrated a serious interest in genealogy, and covers the entire cost of the NGS Home Study Course.
  • Rubincam Youth Award: Established in 1986 to honor Milton Rubicam, CG, FASG, FNGS, for his many years of service to NGS, these awards encourage and recognize our youth as the next generation of family historians. Beginning this year, the winner of the Junior Rubincam award will receive a $250 award in addition to a one-year membership to NGS.

More specific details about each competition can be found on the NGS website. Individuals and societies making nominations will receive an acknowledgement that their entry has been received. An additional seven competitions and award entries have a deadline of 31 January 2015. See the submissions calendar for more details. Questions about all awards and competitions may be directed to awards@ngsgenealogy.org.




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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23 November 2015

Genealogy / History Achievement Award (sponsored by ProQuest)


Established in 1992, Genealogy / History Achievement Award, Sponsored by ProQuest, presents a citation and $1,500* to a librarian, library or publisher, in recognition of professional achievement in historical or genealogical reference, service, or research librarianship. The recipient shall be selected for exceptional accomplishment in one or more of the following areas: leadership; service; training; reference; or publication of recent, significant print or digital reference works/projects that offer access to genealogical or historical sources. Preference shall be given to members of RUSA [Editor’s note: Reference and User Services Association].

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Nomination materials should include the following:
  • A completed copy of the nomination form
  • Complete contact information for both the nominee and the nominator
  • Previous work experience (titles and employers)
  • An outline of service to ALA, RUSA and the History Section Service to allied organizations
  • Awards received
  • Publication credits
  • A narrative outlining why the nominee deserves the award; must go beyond a listing of the nominee’s credentials.  
  • Any other information relevant to the nominee’s qualifications for this award

Questions may be directed to the committee chair, Helen Gbala, gbalah@cod.edu.

*Monetary award amounts are subject to change without notice and are contingent upon donor funding supplied at the time the award is presented. Questions about these awards should be directed to the committee chairperson or to Leighann Wood, RUSA awards program coordinator, at lwood@ala.org.

Nominations
To nominate a deserving member, download and complete the nomination form, and follow the submission instructions therein.

Submissions must be received by December 4, 2015.

Questions should be directed to the committee chair, Helen Gbala, gbalah@cod.edu.


Editor’s Note: You can learn more about this award and its past recipients here.




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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21 November 2015

National Genealogical Society Announces Program for the 2016 Family History Conference



ARLINGTON, VA, 20 NOVEMBER 2015—The National Genealogical Society is pleased to announce the release of its 2016 Family History Conference program. The program, which includes more than 170 lectures, is now available online at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/program/ and as a sixteen-page registration brochure, which can be downloaded at http://goo.gl/w40zSO.

Nationally known speakers and subject matter experts will address a broad array of topics, including records for Florida and its neighboring states; migration into and out of the region; military records; state and federal records. Other topics will discuss genealogical research on African Americans and women; methodology; analysis and problem solving; and the use of technology, including genetics, mobile devices, and apps useful in genealogical research.

The conference will take place at the Greater Ft. Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 4–7 May 2016. Registration opens on 1 December 2015 at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/register/. A number of special events have limited seating, so register on 1 December, or as soon as possible thereafter, if you plan to attend these events.

Up-to-date information about the availability, amenities, and rates for conference hotels can be found at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/attend/accommodations/.

Sign up for the NGS Conference Blog at http://conferenceblog.ngsgenealogy.org so you do not miss conference news or announcements.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia- based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.







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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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20 November 2015

Automobile Blue Book and its Earliest Route Symbols

Want to travel from point A to B?  Nowadays many of us just put the destination address in the mapping program in our cell phone, ask for directions, and we are off on our merry way!

Not so long ago, we had to pull out a map book (if you lived in a metro area) or a map (for a more rural area) and “plot” how we would get from point A to B.

The Slate did a piece on tour books published by the Automobile Club of America when it was in its infancy, The Complex Series of Symbols Early Motorists Used for Wayfinding.

If you want an up close and personal view of a route, these tour books are wonderful since they are from the perspective of driving the road.  This is different than us looking at a satellite view and though something like Google’s street view option might come a bit closer, it’s still not quite the same.

The New York Public Library Digital Collection has digitized a volume (referenced in The Slate article).

You can read more about these fascinating books via The Official Automobile Blue Book, 1901–1929: Precursor to the American Road Map (PDF format)

I learned that in 1910 the club revised its symbols by eliminating and simplifying those in use.

The Internet Archives has a 1917 edition of the “Official Automobile Blue Book 1917 – Volume Two New England, Eastern Canada and Maritime Provinces” online. This volumes doesn’t use symbols like the earlier edition and it does give detailed turn by turn rout information mentioning mileage, landmarks and other details.  An early version of Google Maps, Waze or whatever direction providing software/service you use.

Have you seen these books before? What is your favorite route description or symbol?







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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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19 November 2015

In 2017 NJ Adult Adoptee Can Request Non-Certified Copy of Birth Certificate


Good news for those adopted in New Jersey.  Starting in 2017, an adult adoptee will be able to request a copy a non-certified copy of their original birth certificate.  Parents may choose to have their names redacted.

Additionally, such a document cannot be used to request vital records or other information about their parents.  Adoptees will need to use other records to further their research.








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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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18 November 2015

Did you know that the the Library of Congress has an Extensive Manuscript Collection?


The Library of Congress (LOC) never ceases to amaze me with the breadth of its collection.  I frequently use these LOC collections -- Chronicling America and Maps.  I occasionally dabble in other collections and somehow have managed to overlook the Manuscripts collection! Sacré Bleu.

The other week on FB there were a few posts pointing to finding aids for these two LOC manuscript collections -- Hillcrest Children's Center (Washington, D.C.) records, 1815-1966 and Aaron Ziegelman Foundation collection.

Of course that just whetted my appetite to know what else the LOC Manuscripts collection has.

You can search by keywords or browse by collection as well as by subject and other options.

As always, I started by searching on North Carolina and was surprised to find this genealogical collection (see entry below).  The Contents list provides detailed information about what is included.  You can also print out any located finding aids in various formats (e.g. PDF) which is the most useful format for me as the “Scope and Content Note” was very helpful. 

If you are researching Northumberland & Henrico Counties VA this looks like it could be an excellent resource.

Walter Jones (1745-1815) ... because of Walter Jones’s association with the county court, his papers include several non-family legal documents, actions brought before the court, lists of fees due the clerks, and bills and receipts for legal services rendered by Jones that often cite specifies of the cases involved. These documents supplement the public records of the transactions of the Northumberland County Court ...

... a memorandum book of notes and drafts of legal documents pertaining to Thomas Jones’s service as justice of the peace of Henrico County between 1783 and 1794...


I next searched on Connecticut, my home state, and found these two interesting sounding collections ...

  • John Fisher papers, 1777-1802 -- Military supply agent and merchant. Correspondence, memoranda, accounts, purchase and delivery orders, receipts, requisitions, invoices, and other financial and mercantile records relating primarily to the distribution of food and supplies to the Continental Army in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut.

  • William Torrey papers, 1777-1904 -- Continental Army officer. Orderly books of the Second Massachusetts Regiment, 1777-1783, kept primarily by Torrey, including general, division, brigade, and regimental orders, a muster roll of the regiment, memorandum book containing returns, Continental Congress resolves, and miscellaneous material.
I then searched on South Carolina – History – Civil War, 1861-1865 and there were 14 finding aids found!

Some collections seem to also have been microfilmed.  In that case, you may find that a local library may have a copy or be able to borrow one via interlibrary loan (ILL).  I used Worldcat to search on “Edmund Ruffin diaries” + microfilm and I found that several nearby university libraries have microfilm copies from this collection.  So, this gives me an option to see the contents of a collection held in DC just a few miles from my house.

If you haven’t checked out the LOC Manuscript collection, I really suggest that you do.


What is your favorite newly discovered LOC Manuscript collection?  Do you have an all time favorite one that has greatly assisted your research?








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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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17 November 2015

Eye & Ear Candy -- Harvard + Yale x 2 + Stanford + UC Santa Barbara Reveal New Neat Collections!

Yale's Colonial North American Project

It seemed like every day last week I was learning about new collections that are now available for us to devour.  These five really caught my eye/ear and so I wanted to share!

1. A Digital Portrait of Colonial Life – Harvard's Colonial North American Project website includes 150,000 images of diaries, journals, notebooks, and other rare documents from the 17th and 18th centuries.

2. A postal ‘piggybank’ from the 17th century sheds light on the culture of that time -- The project, titled “Signed, Sealed, and Undelivered,” is an international public-private partnership between researchers from five leading universities — Yale, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Universities of Leiden, Groningen, and Oxford — and the Museum voor Communicatie in The Hague. The project centers on an archive of undelivered letters — many of them unopened — sent from across Europe to The Hague between 1689 and 1707. 

3. French Revolution Digital Archives -- The French Revolution Digital Archive (FRDA) is a multi-year collaboration of the Stanford University Libraries and the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) to produce a digital version of the key research sources of the French Revolution and make them available to the international scholarly community. The archive is based around two main resources, the Archives parlementaires and a vast corpus of images first brought together in 1989 and known as the Images de la Revolution française.

4. 10,000 wax cylinders digitized and free to download -- The University of California at Santa Barbara library has undertaken an heroic digitization effort for its world-class archive of 19th and early 20th century wax cylinder recordings, and has placed over 10,000 songs online for anyone to download, stream and re-use.

5. Photogrammar (via Yale) -- web-based platform for organizing, searching, and visualizing the 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945 created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI).







Have you recently heard about a neat collection that your fellow family historians might find interesting?









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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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16 November 2015

Spanish Supreme Court Denies "Right to be Forgotten" in Digital Media, But Not For Search Engines (via IAJGS Records Access Alert)


Here is another example of a post accessible via the IAJGS Records Access Alert emails. Details on how to access these alerts provided after the article.

This and many issues related to records “access” often come down to privacy versus freedom of information. 

Another loss for search engines containing factual information-even if not current information.

On October 19, 2015 the Spanish Supreme Court in a ruling rejected a petition to have EL PAÍS  remove information from its online archive that the petitioners viewed as detrimental to them.  In the ruling, the justices said newspapers were not under the obligation to alter their archives in order to delete all references to the names of these individuals.

However, the ruling also said the newspapers have a responsibility to ensure that this information cannot be “easily” accessed through online search engines.

The story goes back 20 years to 1985 when EL PAÍS published a story about two people arrested on a drug trafficking charge. The article included information on their arrest, imprisonment and personal circumstances.  This was before the world wide web existed. But in 2009, when the two people had served their time and their criminal records erased they found that some of the top search engines, such as Google led to the old newspaper stories. While lower jurisdiction courts found in favor of  the plaintiffs to have the information not only not searchable but removed from the newspaper’s archives, the appeal to the Supreme Court  rejected the need to alter the archive, but upheld the search engine ruling  The Supreme Court said: ” The so-called right to be forgotten cannot entail a retrospective censorship of information that was originally published correctly.” OId news can’t be cancelled or altered as “digital archives are protected by freedom of information as they satisfy a public interest.”

This is another example of the continuing debate between the United States’ first amendment rights vs the European Union’s contention that privacy trumps the freedom of information.


Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

What do you think? Did the court get it right?  Should privacy prevail?  Should there be limits to Freedom of Information?


Accessing the IAJGS Records Access Alerts ...

Registration and a listing of your organization affiliation (genealogy society, etc.) may now go to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts. You will receive an email response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized.

[Editor’s note -- When you sign up, if you are doing so as an individual and not as a representative of an organization, please list Upfront with NGS or NGS as your affiliation.]
[Editor’s note – if you do not reply to this email, you will NOT be subscribed]
[Editor’s note – you can select to get a daily digest mode vs real-time posts]

For those who may wish to access the archives of the IAJGS Records Access Alerts, go to:http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/. You must be registered to access the archives.


Editor’s Note: Access the first post in this ongoing series was IAJGS Public Records Access Alerts Now Available to Any Interested Person + EU Privacy Win




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