30 March 2016

Dive into Genetic Genealogy at the NGS 2016 Family History Conference


Dive into Genetic Genealogy at the
NGS 2016 Family History Conference

Family historians interested in learning more about DNA testing and genetic genealogy should be sure to check out this year’s National Genealogical Society Conference in Florida, 4-7 May. The conference at the Greater Ft. Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center is a premier opportunity to meet and network with other genealogists. It offers 180 presentations, including twelve lectures focused on DNA and genetic genealogy, for both new and seasoned researchers. For those interested in genetic genealogy, topics include testing companies, the types of DNA testing available and their strengths and weaknesses, and using DNA as evidence in conjunction with traditional documentary sources.


Beginners won’t want to miss “Sex, DNA, and Family History,” presented by Shellee A. Morehead, PhD, CGSM, which covers how DNA is transmitted, and describes the types of testing available to the genealogist. Additionally, Ft. Lauderdale’s own Diahan Southard will offer insight into ethnicity estimates and interpreting the maps and percentages provided by the testing services in “DNA Testing and Your Ethnic Origins.”

Conference attendees will be able to see how seasoned genealogists have solved genealogical brick walls using DNA testing, and learn about third-party tools that they use. Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGLSM, will demonstrate the methodology he used to solve an early 1800s, longstanding genealogical problem in his lecture, “Systematically Using Autosomal DNA Test Results To Help Break Through Genealogical Brick Walls.” Ginger R. Smith, MLS will explain the basics of using a popular third-party tool, “How To Use Gedmatch.com To Optimize Your DNA Testing Experience.”

In all, the conference offers a broad array of topics, including building your family tree, problem-solving, researching ethnic and religious groups, military records, land records, migration patterns, and online and archival records as well as technology.

Visit the NGS 2016 
NGS Family History Conference website for more information about this year’s conference or to register.  Attendees may register at the door, please note that registration for all meals and social events closes on 22 April 2016.





The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®.







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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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29 March 2016

Early Bird Discount Ends 31 March -- NGS 2016 Family History Conference Ft. Lauderdale, FL


NGS 2016 Family History Conference
Ft. Lauderdale, FL

Arlington, VA, 29 March 2016—Time is quickly running out on the early bird discount for the National Genealogical Society (NGS) Family History Conference in Ft. Lauderdale. After 31 March 2016, the registration price for NGS members will increase from $205 to $240 for all four days and the non-NGS member price will increase from $240 to $275. You also will no longer be able to order a printed syllabus or flash drive version of the syllabus. To qualify for the early bird discount, your registration must be received online or postmarked by 31 March.

The Conference will feature more than 180 lectures from basic to advanced genealogical research, including four days of BCG Skillbuilding lectures and twelve lectures on genetic genealogy. Diversity is another focus of this year’s conference. Eighteen lectures discuss African-American genealogical research, five focus on Jewish genealogy, two on Cuban genealogy, and nine on women. Floridians and those with ancestors from Florida will want to consider the nine lectures that focus on Florida’s rich archival history.  In addition, the conference will provide a number of lectures on European ancestors, including French, Spanish, Scandinavian, Italian, Scots-Irish, and others.

The NGS Conference will be held at the Greater Ft. Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center and will run from 4-7 May.  For conference information and to register, go to the 2016 NGS Family History Conference.

Social Events, Luncheons, and the NGS Banquet
Participating organizations sponsor several luncheons at which guest speakers address many fascinating presentations such as
·       “Lost Eyes, Whipping Posts, and Wife Swapping: Lessons from Yesteryear”
·       “To the Rescue: 10 Times A Local Society has Saved My Bacon”
·       “Genetic Surprises, DNA and ’Non-paternity‘ Events”

The NGS Banquet is an event not to be missed! Guest speaker David E. Rencher, AG, CGSM, FIGRS, FUGA, will discuss what matters most to genealogists and family historians. Registration for all meals and social events closes on 22 April 2016. Tickets for social events will not be sold on-site. Be sure to sign up as quickly as possible. The Florida State Genealogical Society Host Event, “Taste of Florida,” is $42; luncheons are $32; and the banquet is $45. Menus are in the registration brochure.

Local Area Tours
There’s still time to sign up for two exciting tours on Tuesday, 3 May 2016, prior to the NGS Family History Conference. For more information, please see Local Area Tours. Registration for the tours closes on 22 April 2016.

Add Items to an Existing Registration
To add meals, tours, and pre-conference events to your current registration, log on to the NGS website, click on My Account, select My Events, and then click to Add Sessions.

We hope to see you in Ft. Lauderdale in May!





Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists. Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.

 #     #     #

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®.












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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Call for Proposals Deadline is 1 April 2016 -- National Genealogical Society 2017 Family History Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina




Call for Proposals Deadline is 1 April 2016
National Genealogical Society 2017 Family History Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina

Arlington, VA, 29 MARCH 2016—Time is running out for speakers as well as organizations interested in sponsoring lectures to submit lecture proposals for the National Genealogical Society (NGS) 2017 Family History Conference, Family History Lives Here, to be held in Raleigh, North Carolina, from 10–13 May 2017. All proposals must be submitted electronically through the NGS website by 11:59 p.m. EDT on 1 April 2016.

Throughout its history, North Carolina has been home to a diverse population including Native Americans and those who trace their heritage back to Europe and Africa. During colonial times, it was one of a few colonies that embraced religious diversity, welcoming Quakers, Huguenots, Methodists, and Moravians. It is a land rich in cultural traditions. From the lighthouses on the outer banks to the falling waters on the Piedmont, to the dramatic overlooks in the mountains, this land calls us back to take a closer look. The Tar Heel story is vibrant, shared through the words of each family, and recorded in the wonderful records, manuscripts, and artifacts preserved in the numerous North Carolina archives, special collections, museums, libraries, historical sites, and societies.

Among the topics being considered by NGS for its 2017 conference are presentations on North Carolina history, including available records and repositories; land grants and other land records; court system and laws; ethnic and religious groups; military, farming, and other occupations; neighboring states; and migration to, from, and within the Carolinas. The Society also will consider other topics of interest reaching from the Colonial era to the 21st Century. In addition, NGS encourages the submission of proposals for broader genealogical categories, including methodology, problem solving, and technology.

Speakers who wish to submit lecture proposals, and organizations interested in sponsoring tracks or individual lectures, should follow the published guidelines at the NGS website page: http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/call_for_proposals.

Organizations wishing to sponsor a lecture may submit proposals via https://goo.gl/6SYFcc.


Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.












~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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28 March 2016

Freedmen’s Bureau records are “color blind” – why everyone should check these records!


Freedmen’s Bureau records are “color blind” – why everyone should check these records!

The records of the Freedmen’s Bureau have been frequently in the news lately due to an initiative to index these records – The Freedmen’s Bureau Project1. This project has the tagline 

... helping African Americans reconnect with their Civil War­-era ancestors

These records are excellent for that purpose. During the seven years of its existence (1865-1872) and despite a lack of sufficient funding, it sought to provide help to four million former slaves.

However, researchers should not assume that entries found for a name of interest are for a freed slave. In fact, many of these records are “color-blind” and include records for both “colored” and “white” individuals. To qualify for support from the Freedmen’s Bureau, one only had to be declared poor, destitute, infirmed, or in some form of need. In the immediate aftermath of the Civil War, most people living from Delaware to Texas, regardless of race or original circumstances, would have qualified for support.

I have been researching in these records for many years focusing on North Carolina.  I find as many, if not more records documenting the widows and children of deceased or maimed civil war soldiers (Union & Confederate), aged and infirmed individuals, recent immigrants, and soldiers themselves, than those of freed slaves, especially when it comes to receiving rations (i.e., pork and corn).  

Many pertinent records are found in the Freedmen’s Bureau records of field offices for the various states. If you have immediate post-Civil War southern ancestry, CHECK OUT these records. Even if your family was not impoverished, they may have been party to a contract, required medical assistance (returning soldiers especially), been brought before a court managed by the Freedmen’s Bureau, or found in other records.

ALL southern researchers, regardless of color or circumstances, need to explore the hidden gems found in these records.

Learn more about these records at the upcoming NGS Conference, session T227 (Thursday, May 5, 2016, 11am-12pm), Freedmen’s Bureau Records – More Valuable to Anyone’s Southern Research Than You Might Have Thought! part of the African American track.






1 Partnership between FamilySearch, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society (AAHGS), and the California African American Museum






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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25 March 2016

Oral History -- Exploring African American Credit Unions



We often think of Oral History as focusing on people and families and their stories.

I read with great interest a recent Southern Oral History Program blog post titled African American Credit Unions.

Instead of focusing on the documentary trail, field scholars went out and interviewed individuals to “reveal how they and their communities adapted to segregated banking by creating and growing their own credit unions. Even after many of these racial barriers fell, black credit unions continued to grow and merge with others into the 21st century.”

The blog post includes interview clips as well as some documentary evidence of the history of the rise of African American credit unions in NC.

With a bit of digging I found someone else who interviewed “African American credit union elders” as reported in Labor Unions in the African American Credit Union Experience: Oral History Tour Take-away #1 (Credit Union History blog).  Here is a video created before the oral history tour commenced.


Are you aware of Oral History projects which focus on an institution or aspect of general history versus genealogy and family history? 





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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24 March 2016

Norfolk County (MA) Transcribing More Than 250,000 Deeds



[Editor’s Note: A pop up screen will encourage you to subscribe, you can just shut it down and access the article]

... But anyone studying the nearly 200-year-old deed today might not be able to easily glean those reflections by Adams or the other particulars of the document. Handwritten in the flowing cursive style of the day, the densely-packed words are a challenge to read.

Now a nearly completed initiative by the Norfolk County registry is promising to make it much easier for modern readers to decipher the contents of the Adams deed and other old land records. In what officials say is the first project of its kind in New England, the registry in Dedham is transcribing into type all the county’s handwritten deeds from the time of its founding in 1793 to 1900, when the office switched to typing its documents...

To access the records, visit the Norfolk County Register of Deeds Records Database. It is recommended that you use Internet Explorer or Firefox and do NOT use Chrome, since Java is required and currently not supported by Chrome.

There are pay and free options.  I’d start with the free option and see if that is sufficient for your needs.

In North Carolina, many register of deeds offices have placed older indexes and/or complete runs of their deeds online.  

Has your local deed office or equivalent put records online?

Do you know of a local project which will improve access to records important to family history research? 






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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23 March 2016

Discover Your African American Ancestors at the NGS Family History Conference


Discover Your African American Ancestors at the NGS Family History Conference

Diversity is the hallmark of the National Genealogical Society (NGS) 2016 Family History Conference  at the Greater Ft. Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center from 4-7 May. The conference will offer more than ten fascinating lectures on African American genealogy. Many of the lectures will provide intriguing insights into little known chapters of African American history. One such lecture examines the Confederate Army pension records for “…those colored men who served as servants and cooks in the Confederate Army in the War Between the States…” Another attempts to solve the mystery behind the flight of the free Creoles of color from Pensacola, Florida, to Tampico, Mexico, prior to the Civil War. Yet, another delves into the history of the Pla├žage, women of color who were the common-law wives of colonial French and Spanish men.

Conference attendees interested in uncovering their African American family tree will also learn about invaluable archival sources that can aid their research. Two case studies illustrate the challenges of tracing ancestors from slave days to the 20th century. The first focuses on records that uncover the new identities created by former slaves in the post-Civil War era. The second details how one genealogist identified slaves of Roseland Plantation in Louisiana. Other lectures discuss how manuscripts, census slave schedules, Freedmen’s Bureau records, African American cemeteries, and Black college newspapers can advance your genealogical research.

In addition, ten lectures focus on DNA and genetic genealogy, including an overview of GEDmatch.com, a look at ethical questions about DNA testing, and discussions on how the use of autosomal DNA, YDNA, and mtDNA can advance family research. Another nine address the challenges of researching female ancestors.

In all, the conference will feature 180 lectures both for those new to genealogy and for seasoned researchers. For more conference information and to register, go to the 2016 NGS Family History Conference. An early bird discount is available through 31 March 2016. Though individuals may register at the door, registration for all meals and social events closes on 22 April 2016.













~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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22 March 2016

NGS Announces Student Discount Rate for 2016 Conference


Arlington, VA, 22 March 2016—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) is offering college and graduate students drastically discounted rates for its 2016 Family History Conference: Exploring the Centuries: Footprints in Time, 4–7 May 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Qualifying students can register for all four days of the conference for $60, or $50 if they are members of NGS—a $215 and $190 savings, respectively. To qualify, students must submit a letter on college or university letterhead signed by the dean or a department chair confirming his/her current admittance, good standing, and full-time status in an undergraduate or graduate degree-seeking program at a regionally accredited institution of higher learning. 

Click Here to Claim the Student Rate
The conference offers students a unique opportunity to attend a wide range of lectures on such topics as
  • the basics of genealogical research and developing a sound research plan
  • overviews of repositories, including libraries, archives, newspapers, military, civil, and religious records, online resources, etc.
  • genetic research
as well as lectures that focus on African-American, Cuban, Jewish, French, Scots-Irish, and other ancestors; Florida’s history and its people, and much, much more. The conference also offers students the chance to discover how they might incorporate genealogical methods into their studies and, in turn, how they might apply knowledge from their fields of study to genealogy.

To register, students should download the Conference’s Student Registration Form and follow the directions provided on the NGS website at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/student-rate/. The student discount will not apply if a student registers directly through the Conference website. For more information about the Conference’s program, go to http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/program/http://members.ngsgenealogy.org/Conferences/2012Program.cfm and the PDF brochure at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/2016-Registration-Brochure.pdf. The brochure offers information about sessions, tours, pre-conference events, on-site registration, and details for hotel registration.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, the highest standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.










~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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21 March 2016

Transcribing -- a great way to celebrate Sunshine Week and you can do it year round!




The NARA Citizen Archivist initiative celebrated it by having transcription missions ...

Every transcription helps "unlock" the information and helps open government records. Each day of this week-long event we’ll release a mission based on an historical era. Our goal is to transcribe 2,000 pages this week. Transcriptions created by Citizen Archivists will enhance searches in our catalog and the transcriptions will be added to DocsTeach, the online tool for teaching with documents from the National Archives.

·        Sunday, March 13 – 
·        Monday March 14 – Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)
·        Tuesday, March 15 - The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900) 
·        Wednesday, March 16 – The Emergence of Modern American (1890-1930)  
·        Thursday, March 17 – The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945) 
·        Friday, March 18 - Postwar United States (1945 to early 1970s)
·        Saturday, March 19 - Contemporary United States (1968-Present) 

I wonder how successful they were.

Did you transcribe something last week for a genealogical or historical society, library, archive or repository?  

Every document transcribed is one that becomes “open” to researchers to use!











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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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