Showing posts with label Immigration. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Immigration. Show all posts

18 July 2014

Now Available -- June 2014 Edition of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly


Volume 102, Number 2 of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly is now available online in the Members Only section of the website.

Feature Articles
+ Why and How did Philippina Kicherer Immigrate to Jefferson County, Pennsylvania?, by Judy Kellar Fox, CG
+ Jane Fife’s Mother: Elizabeth (Sowersby) Stather Fife Hought, by Arlene V. Jennings, CG
+ Testing Family Lore to Determine the Parentage of Samuel W. Boren of Pittsburgh, by Harold Henderson, CG
+ Using Networks to Backtrack the Migration and Identify the Parents of Jacob Wynkoop of Morgan County, Ohio, by Stephen B. Hatton
+ Testing the FAN Principle against DNA: Zilphy (Watts) Price Cooksey Cooksey of Georgia and Mississippi, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FNGS, FASG


and other regular features ...



Editor’s Note: Please note that online access to the NGS Quarterly (NGSQ) and NGS Magazine are available only as long as your membership is active. You can access the NGSQ archive – the index is available for FREE and as a member you can access archives encompassing 1970, 1972–74, 1976, 1978–current.


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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20 June 2014

The Giessen Emigration Society Genealogy Project



It’s always fun to read about a project and in the process learn a bit of history too! 

Read this piece sent from the Missouri Germans Consortium.

The Giessen Emigration Society Genealogy Project

Imagine yourself trying to locate the descendants of 500 German emigrants.  They're not the same family, religion, nor do they come from the same village or province. The only thing in common is that they immigrated to the United States from Bremen in 1834, as members of the Giessen Emigration Society. Some of them left in March and arrived in New Orleans in June on board the ship the Olbers. The rest left in June and arrived in Baltimore in July aboard the Medora.   There are passenger arrival lists, newspaper accounts, written accounts, diaries, journals, and histories written about the group. Add to the problem, they didn't settle together in Arkansas as originally planned. Some of them even returned to Germany after arrival or within a few years. Known as the Giessen Emigration Society, no one is certain if all passengers on each ship lists were members. 

Where to start
Fortunately, the Passenger lists exist for both ships so the first step is to create a database of all names. Written accounts state that membership in the Giessen Emigration Society was closed at 500, even though thousands had applied to join. The first ship, the Olbers, had a female passenger become ill with Typhoid before it had even passed the British Isles. The second group, which came on the Medora, became stalled near Bremen when the ship they had chartered did not arrive. Stranded, and living on the island Harriersand in the Weser River, some gave up hope and abandoned the group, or may have have taken another ship. Journals and diaries of members tell us about many who died, married and were born on the island and on each ship. Even though no account book or journal listing the members has been found yet, we chose not to eliminate any passengers listed, without definitive answers, we won’t eliminate any possibilities for information. Next, we map out their pathways.

Meet us in St. Louis
When Giessen Society founders Friedrich Muench and Paul Follenius issued the Call in Giessen, Germany, published in July 1833, it was considered an illegal act by their government. They didn't follow Duden’s recommendation of sending a scout or "agent" until their organizational meeting in September 1833, when Müeller and Schmidt headed to the Territory of Arkansas, to report back on the location. When they returned to Bremen in time to tell Paul Follenius, leader of the first group about to board the Olbers, not to go to Arkansas, there was a sudden change in plans. Needing to leave, Follenius sent word to Friedrich Muench, to meet him in St. Louis, and departed for the U.S.  Within the first few days, Typhoid broke out on the Olbers, but that was not the worst problem. As they were about to enter port, June 4, 1834, they learned from departing ships, that Cholera was epidemic in New Orleans. Getting through port as quickly as possible, they headed by steamboat up the Mississippi towards St. Louis. Many members did fall ill, were lost, only to be buried along the route. When they reached St. Louis, they waited for a bit, hoping for the rest of the group, before heading west on the Boone's Lick Road. The road, running west from St. Charles, was a common pathway for thousands heading to the far west.  Some members aboard the Olbers settled first in New Orleans and Cape Girardeau, but most came on and purchased land in Illinois and Missouri. 

Given up for Lost 
As the second group of the Society arrived in Bremen, they learn that the ship they had chartered had not arrived yet. Not knowing when a ship that had room would arrive, they were desperate, not wanting to use up funds destined for land purchase in the U.S. At that time, Bremerhaven was new, and lodging establishments had not been built. Trying to save funds, many took refuge in a hausbarn as cattle were pastured on the Weser River, across from Brake, on the Harriersand Island. Finally, weeks later, the group was able to charter the Medora and head for America
Baltimore was in the midst of a heat wave. One died from sunstroke, and one actually returned to Germany, according to some accounts. The group then followed the suggested route of Gottfried Duden, to Cincinnati, then down river and up, to St. Louis. Yes, some stopped, deciding to establish homes, along the way. Even though they found St. Louis embroiled in Cholera, some would stop and make their home, as the best place to earn a living if you were not "farmer" material was the big city. Those that could not tolerate the practice of slavery chose Illinois, with many settling in St. Clair County there. 

Where to go from here
By now you have gathered that the Giessen Emigration Society Genealogy Project is searching for German emigrants, with the only thing in common, is that they either came in on the Olbers to New Orleans around June 4, 1834 or the Medora to Baltimore where they arrived mid-July.  Descendants of many families have already been located.

Families that have visited the exhibition in Germany, learning their family had members, have contacted the exhibition’s organizers, and have been re-united with families in the United States. Others, who know their family were GES members, assist with clues found in their family history.  More information about the Giessen Emigration Society, can be seen in the exhibition Utopia – Revisiting a German State in America, while in Bremen, Germany, Washington, D.C., or St. Louis, Missouri or in the companion book by the same name that is available from the University of Chicago Press.

If you have ancestors that you suspect were members of the Giessen Emigration Society we would like to hear from you!  Please contact us by email at dkfranke@mo-germans.com or visit our website http://mo-germans.com today.

Whether your ancestors emigrated from Germany in 1834 and may have been a part of the Giessen Emigration Society, or not, I found their story a compelling read.



Are you a member of or participating in a project which focuses on a unique group of individuals?  If so, tell us about it and we may share their story with the readers of Upfront with NGS.



           




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.


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25 April 2014

Upfront Mini Bytes – Philadelphia, Irish Research, Vita Brevis, Portuguese Archives, Colorized Photographs, FIBIS, and Boston Immigrants

Welcome to our newest edition of our bi-weekly feature Upfront Mini Bytes.  In Upfront Mini Bytes we provide eight tasty bits of genealogy news that will help give you a deeper byte into your family history research. Each item is short and sweet.  We encourage you to check out the links to articles, blog posts, resources, and anything genealogical!

We hope you found the past editions helpful.  Use your favorite search engine with “Upfront with NGS” “Mini Bytes” or use this Google search link.

Do you have questions, suggestions for future posts, or comments?  Please post a comment or send an e-mail to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Did you know that there is something called Library Company of Philadelphia? The Library Company of Philadelphia is an independent research library specializing in American history and culture from the 17th through the 19th centuries.  Open to the public free of charge, the Library Company houses an extensive collection of rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art.  I learned about it through its Flickr page
.
Ireland’s Memorial Records are now digitized and online via the Flanders Fields Museum project website. These records represent the 49,000 names published in 1923 by The Committee of the Irish National War Memorial and were originally alphabetically listed in eight leather bound volumes.

AmericanAncestors.org (aka New England Historic Genealogical Society, NEHGS) has a new blog, Vita Brevis designed to offer the reader short essays by the Society’s expert staff on their own research as well as news of the greater genealogical community.

Dick Eastman (EOGN) brought to our attention that there is a new website, Tombo, with Information about 20+ District Archive Sites in Portugal. The website is mostly in Portuguese and you can select an English interface, though recognize that any records mentioned are listed in Portuguese.

Colorized historic photos are just mesmerizing. Check out a video, Brief Moments in History, to see some stunning images of what these photos might have looked like had color photography been invented and in wide-spread use.

Families in British India Society (FIBIS) has a new database, St. Helena, South Atlantic – Banns of Marriage 1849-1924. Check out the full holdings of the FIBIS database here.

The MapLab of WIRED ran a piece, Maps Reveal How Immigration Transformed Boston’s Neighborhoods. A new exhibit at the Boston Public Library uses maps, modern and historic photos, and census data to illustrate how waves of immigration shaped the city and its individual neighborhoods in the 20th century — and continue to shape them today.

Another Irish research resource! How to trace your Ancestors in County Monaghan (Ireland) is a free guide that discusses the many records available to genealogical researchers.










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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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10 January 2014

National Archives (aka NARA) -- Rubenstein Gallery now open



Earlier this month, the David M. Rubenstein Gallery at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) building in DC opened. It is the home of the new Records of Rights permanent exhibit “which showcases the long struggle to secure and exercise individual rights for all Americans.

The centerpiece of “Records of Rights” is the 1297 Magna Carta, which David [M. Rubenstein] purchased five years ago because he believed the one copy of this famous charter in the United States should not leave this country ...

The three major sections of “Records of Rights” highlight the struggles of Americans to define and realize their civil rights through the stories of African Americans, women, and immigrants. Through documents, photographs, drawings, and films from National Archives holdings, we explore how our forerunners sought to fulfill the promise of freedom set out in our founding documents.”

Next time you are in DC at NARA, consider visiting this exhibit.








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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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04 July 2013

Liberty Island Re-opens Today -- a special place for so many genealogists with emigrant ancestors!

Photo of "The Lady" taken mid 1980s
Copyright Diane L Richard
Liberty Island ... a special place to many of us who have emigrant ancestors.  For many, the first time our ancestors stepped foot in the US was on Ellis Island just after they saw The Statue of Liberty as they entered the harbor.  She is significant to the history of many.

She is also wonderful to visit ...

For my own ancestors, a few came through NY and more came through Boston. What about in your family?

Did your ancestors talk about when they arrived? 
If they arrived in NY, did they mention The Statue of Liberty?
Have you visited The Statue of Liberty?  What did you think?

Read more about the re-opening here:





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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25 January 2013

New & Improved USCIS History and Genealogy Notebook


U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has created a new and improved Genealogy website including a page called the “Genealogy Notebook” -- a gateway to the history of the service, research guidance, records requests and much more.

Besides reformatting the “old site” to be more useful, the USCIS has also added some resources to help you as you request records:
  • Avoid Common Errors – helps requestors avoid mistakes that could cost them extra time and money.
  • Does My Request Qualify -- ensures that requesters are able to easily identify which Genealogy Program service would be the most beneficial to them
  • Research Guide -- provides information pertaining to Arrival and Nationality records organized by date, and provides valuable information about Historical USCIS topics and events.

Not familiar with immigration documents?  Besides reading the aforementioned Research Guide, check out the new “Image Galleries” so that you can see what the most common file types might include.

If you are researching an immigrant ancestor and are seeking their A-Files (Alien registration), C-Files, Registry Files and/or Visa Files, this is a great place to get started.  

Even if you don’t know which of these files are relevant to your immigrant ancestor, the website will tell you all about what these files are, what research value they have and how to request.


Did you find the website helpful or interesting?  If so, please share what you found most helpful.

If you have done a lot of immigrant/emigrant research, what advice would you share with someone just starting out who is seeking documents from USCIS?  



Editor's Note: USCIS was formed in 2003 when the old Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) was dismantled.  Just in case those who have been doing immigration research for a while wondered.


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com


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04 July 2012

National Archives exhibit shows prejudices faced by immigrants over the years


Image that appeared with original article

With many of our ancestors emigrants, whether as the country was forming or as the immigration wave of the early 1900s hit, we have a shared fascination with learning what life was like for emigrants and also in the trials and tribulations of leaving their birth country.  It took my great grandfather at least 3 attempts to be able to legally emigrate and his future wife’s family all came over one-at-a-time.

An article recently published in the Washington Post, “National Archives Exhibit shows prejudices faced by immigrants over the years,” discusses some of the challenges faced by the emigrants with regards to be allowed to emigrate.

... in the National Archives’ new exhibit on the history of the travails of immigration, which opened Friday in the archives’ main building in downtown Washington.

Entitled “Attachments: Faces and Stories From America’s Gates,” it is a look at the difficulties and prejudices faced by immigrants down through the years, and the harrowing roads some traveled to reach America.

Told with documents, letters and affidavits, the exhibit’s power is in its black-and-white photographs — many blown up to huge size — of people.

Read the full article.

Did your emigrant ancestor face challenges in their efforts to emigrate to the US?  If so, please share their story!





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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15 June 2012

Ellis Island Name Change Rumors Persist

Source: http://www.nyc-architecture.com/LM/Ellis_island(1).jpg
Betty Lou Malesky recently wrote for the Green Valley News and Sun ...

“The main character, Ciro Lazarri, passed through Ellis Island on his way from Italy. The immigration officer presented him with a list of names and suggested he select one for his American surname. They included Smith, Brown, Jones, Hill and other simple English names, but the inspector suggested changing his surname to Lewis since his Italian surname started with an “L.” Wisely, Ciro refused to change.

This Ellis Island rumor just won’t die, and it’s sad to see it encouraged, even in fiction. Genealogists will readily agree no immigrant had his name changed at Ellis Island; certainly there is no documented evidence of it...”

Read the full article.






Editor’s Note: I can tell you that in my family, though their name was NOT changed at Ellis Island they did change it within the 1st year of arriving in the US.  They emigrated as Kujanpää from Finland in 1900 and with the birth of their youngest daughter in 1901 the surname became Acey!  No one can accuse my ancestors of choosing an American name or even a translation of their Finnish name!

Did your emigrant ancestors change their name soon after arriving?





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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26 April 2012

Why can't I find my grandmother's passport?

Bobeyka Family Passport (Russian)

This article on Genealogy Today is a reminder to us that passports are a somewhat modern requirement for international travel.  Even my emigrant ancestors from Finland in 1900 had a Russian Passport!

And, we are also reminded how important it is to know the laws of what documentation is required and for who to best understand what we find!

What is the oldest passport you have for an ancestor?  Post a comment as we’d love to hear about it!





~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com


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30 August 2011

Ancestry.com Offers Free Access to Immigration and Naturalization Records

PROVO, UT--(Marketwire - Aug 29, 2011) - Ancestry.com, the world's largest online family history resource, today announced an entire week of free access to its popular U.S. and International Immigration and Naturalization records. The free access week begins August 29th and runs through the Labor Day holiday ending September 5th. During this time, all visitors to Ancestry.com will be able to search for free the indices and images of new and updated U.S. immigration records as well as selected international immigration records from the United Kingdom, Ireland, Italy, Australia, Canada, Germany, Sweden and Mexico. Millions of Americans can trace their family history to other countries, and these collections provide valuable information about the travels and journeys that brought them to America or other countries around the world.

Ancestry.com's extensive collection of immigration, naturalization and travel records offers an important resource for discovering and celebrating family history. As part of this promotion, the company is adding to its collection of U.S. and international records for tracing relatives from their homeland to other countries around the world. These records include ships passenger and crew lists, declarations of intent, petitions for naturalization, witness affidavits, border crossings, certificates and other records generated by the naturalization process, which is the act and procedure of becoming a new citizen of a country. Because the process has changed significantly over time and varies from country to country, different records are available from a wide variety of state, federal and international sources.

Newly added U.S. collections include Florida Petitions for Naturalization, 1913-1991; Delaware Naturalization Records, 1796-1959 and Utah Naturalization and Citizenship Records, 1850-1960. Noteworthy updated U.S. and international collections include U.S. Naturalization and Passport applications, 1795-1972; UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960; Border Crossings: From Canada to U.S., 1895-1956; New South Wales, Australia, Unassisted Immigrant Passenger Lists, 1826-1922; Border Crossings: From Mexico to U.S., 1895-1957; New York State, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1917-1973; Atlantic Ports Passenger Lists, 1820-1873 and 1893-1959.

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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com.


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