Showing posts with label NARA. Show all posts
Showing posts with label NARA. Show all posts

07 October 2014

FREE NARA Webinar TONIGHT -- Primary Sources!


Primary Sources are so important to our family history research!

Help the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), The White House Historical Assocation, and National History Day (NHD) staff celebrate NHD with a FREE Webinar tonight, 6pm EST.

The description of the program is so spot on to what I am always telling people.  We best understand our ancestors, what they did, and something out their lives if we understand the context of those lives ...

Documents—diaries, letters, drawings, and memoirs—created by those who participated in or witnessed the events of the past tell us something that even the best-written article or book cannot convey (excerpt from our website).

As all National History Day (NHD) students and teachers know, nothing in history happens in a vacuum.

Register for this FREE event with presenters from all of the sponsoring organizations.






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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05 September 2014

FREE -- National Archives (NARA) Virtual Genealogy Fair, 28-30 Oct 2014 -- No Excuse NOT to attend!


Though I loved attending, in person, a NARA genealogy fair a few years ago, when sequestration hit last year, NARA came up with an alternative, a Virtual Genealogy Fair 2013.  I am happy to report that after the resounding success of last year’s virtual event, NARA is doing the same this year.

Running from October 28-30th and starting at 10am EST daily, the 2014 edition of the National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair gives you the option of listening to speakers including genealogy experts from National Archives locations across the nation and U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services.  You will be able to access the live video streams on YouTube.

Day 1 video stream: Tuesday, October 28
Watch live on YouTube 
Day 2 video stream: Wednesday, October 29
Watch live on YouTube 
Day 3 video stream: Thursday, October 30
Watch live on YouTube 

You can access the full lecture schedule here.  It looks like there will be a “chatting” option and watch the webpage for details.  As for 2013, recorded sessions will remain available online after the event and the webcast’s will include a close captioning option.

I looked over the lecture schedule and I wanted to point out a lecture a day that I might attend since they are topics I’ve written on before and are topics that many researchers are less aware of!  Though, all of the topics are definitely worthy of your consideration. If only I could take the days off from work

Day 1: Tuesday, October 28

3
noon
When Saying ‘I Do’ Meant Giving Up Your U.S. Citizenship
Meg Hacker
National Archives at 
Fort Worth, TX

Day 2: Wednesday, October 29

5
10 a.m.
Great Granny Eunice came from Ireland, Grandpa Fred was in the War, Can Access Archival Databases (AAD) Help Me?
John Legloahec
National Archives at 
College Park, MD

Day 3: Thursday, October 30

12
10 a.m.
Family History and the FOIA: Researching 20th Century FBI records
Britney Crawford &
Netisha Currie
National Archives at College Park, MD

Put the dates on your calendar, check out the schedule and get ready to learn about some really neat Federal Records that are important to your research.

Let us  know what talk(s) are on your "must listen to" list!



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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26 August 2014

Crowdsourcing -- making recently unimaginable amounts of information available to us at our finger tips!


Crowdsourcing has become a very popular way to get large amounts of material indexed and/or transcribed.

It’s neat to see more and more facilities and groups using this means to get more material available to more people more quickly!

The most recent project I read about is “transcribe” from the Library of Virginia ... “Help improve access to historic documents by transcribing handwritten pages and reviewing transcriptions. Browse the items in each collection (“Browse all”) to see which ones need work. Create an account to enjoy additional features.”

This just shortly after reading The Smithsonian Wants You! (To Help Transcribe Its Collections) “Many myths surround the Smithsonian Institution’s archives—from legends of underground facilities hidden beneath the National Mall to rumors of secret archaeological excavations. One underlying truth persists amid these fallacies: the Institution’s archives are indeed massive. Preserving these collections in a digital age is a gargantuan task, especially when it comes to handwritten documents. Ink fades with time, and individual scrawls sometimes resemble hieroglyphics. It could literally take decades.”


Of course, once I read a new-to-me project I then seek out other projects that are either new to me or that I’ve been reminded of.

Some other current crowdsource projects with a genealogical connection are:

Do you know of other crowdsourcing projects of direct interest to the genealogical and family history community?


Editor’s Note: Previous Upfront with NGS posts on this topic ...
+ NARA Citizen Archivist Dashboard Live! (includes transcription, tagging and other crowdsource options) (2012)






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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08 August 2014

Upfront Mini Bytes – RootsMapper, PA Cemetery Photos, Obituary Research, Irish Research, London Maps, Ship Routes, Audio Video and non-textual collection at NARA, and UK Coalmining

Welcome to our newest edition of our periodic feature Upfront Mini Bytes.  In Upfront Mini Bytes we provide eight tasty bits of genealogy news that will help give you a deeper byte into your family history research. Each item is short and sweet.  We encourage you to check out the links to articles, blog posts, resources, and anything genealogical!

We hope you found the past editions helpful.  Use your favorite search engine with “Upfront with NGS” “Mini Bytes” or use this Google search link.

Do you have questions, suggestions for future posts, or comments?  Please post a comment or send an e-mail to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


If you have your family information stored on FamilySearch, check out the RootsMapper.com capabilities.  Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog, Tech Tuesday: Rootsmapper.com ~ Ya, this is pretty cool!,  gives a great overview on how to use this tool.

This project, FamilyHart’s Harry Senft Cemetery Pictures makes me wish that I had ancestors in York, Adams or Cumberland County PA!  Starting in 2005 Harry Senft has been taking pictures of headstones in the mentioned counties (as well as Carroll County MD).  They are initially placed online in their raw picture form.  As indexed, those indices are placed online.  You can also access custom Google maps for each cemetery location.  A gem of a resource!

I couldn’t agree more ... 30 Reasons Why Searching for Obituaries is Like Finding Gold.  So often, once a researcher has a death certificate or knows in what cemetery someone is buried, they stop looking for more.  It is almost always worth looking for an obituary for a deceased ancestor.  For some, in the absence of a tombstone or death certificate, it might be the only source of death information never mind the “gold” mentioned by Kenneth R Marks in his post.

DigDat Genealogy lets us check out the residents of Cork City (Ireland) in 1875.  The site also has lists for Officers in Regiments of Militia in Ireland from: 1811 Directory of Ireland.

It wouldn’t be an Upfront Mini Bytes post if we didn’t have a map item! The National Library of Scotland has a collection of Ordnance Survey Maps for London (1893-1896).

Why stop at one map item when we can have two.  As someone with 19th century emigrant ancestors, I found Visualization of 19th Century Ship Routes from Publicly Available NOAA Data Set just fascinating to look at.  The article also includes a link to American Whaling Mapped. One of the comments posted had a link to Climatological Database for the World’s Oceans, 1750-1850, British, Dutch, French and Spanish logged sailings (the actual database can be accessed here).  Put these two together and you have a sense of the weather for any given route through time.  With more research like this, pretty soon we might be able to smell the salt air as our ancestors did.

Fess up.  Are you like me and mostly think of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) as a great source for “paper” records and maps?  There is so much more held by NARA.  I was reminded of this when I came across The Unwritten Record: Exploring History with the National Archives’ Special Media Division which publishes about filmphotographsvideossound recordings, and other non-textual records from the National Archives’ holdings.  What initially caught my eye were the Declassified Motion Pictures and Sound Recordings reports. Thank goodness that none of this content is available digitally or I would never get any work done.

This database caught my eye since I did have a branch of my family who worked in the mines of Lancashire in the early 1800s. The Coalmining History Resource Centre has a database of over 164,000 records of coalmining accidents and deaths in the UK.  Additionally, there is information about disasters (during which 5 or more miners died) as well as reports covering 1707-1979 and providing details on each disaster. Fortunately my miner died of old age and not all did.





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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02 June 2014

NARA Open Government Plan


Last week, The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) released its Open Government Plan for the next two years (2014-2016).

The new plan discusses efforts to engage the public in more than 160 external projects on more than 15 social media platforms, as well as through public events, educational programs, Research Services, and Presidential Libraries. The Flagship Initiative, “Innovate to Make Access Happen,” describes digitization, description, and online access efforts via a program to digitize analog records, expand digitization partnerships, and an updated digitization strategy.


I found the graphic on page 15 (reproduced above) very interesting.  I have often wondered if I would be able to fully work as a professional genealogist until I retire (at least 10 years away) given all the digitization which has occurred creating easier access to the records I would once retrieve for clients (see editor’s note).  When I look at this graphic stating that less than 2% of NARA’s textual records have been digitized (never mind indexed), I figure it will be a long time before NARA’s holdings are available digitally.  I suspect that the same holds true for other archives and repositories possessing records of interest to family history researchers. 

It also reminds us that one must do "on-the-ground" (vs virtual research) research to fully explore records relevant to our ancestors!

Obviously, digitization efforts are only one element of the scope of the plan.

What do you think about this plan? Is it what you expected?  Does it set a benchmark for other large repositories to follow? If not, why not?




Editor’s Note: As a professional genealogist, my colleagues and I do more than records retrieval, and this post is only focusing on this one component of what we do.

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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com



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04 April 2014

New Revolutionary War Records -- Congressional claims files -- Citizen Archivist Project



We love learning about records that are newly available to a broad audience, especially if they are records typically under-utilized due to their previous obscurity!

Such is the case with Congressional Claims.

The immediate purpose of the [Citizen Archivist Project] work is two-fold: first, to provide box level descriptions of claims made to Congress by participants in the Revolutionary War, and their heirs or assigns; and second, to introduce students of history, library and/or archival science to the user experience as researchers.  To that end, we have assigned to our student interns the work to produce box-lists of the contents of Congressional claims files papers.   The interns have to determine from the limited finding-aides that already exist, what papers to request for a particular committee, like the Committee on Revolutionary Pensions, or the Committee on Military Affairs, etc. These committee papers, petitions and memorials are requested from the legislative archivists and each document is reviewed.  A synopsis is then made listing more-or-less the relevant data; including at the very least the names of claimants, dates, basic nature of the claim and page count.

Read this post, Archives Fair at the US National Archives, which talks about what has been done in these records for the 16th Congress. Here is an example of two entries:

Ward, Jonathan, 4 January 1820
Report of the Committee on Pensions and Revolutionary Claims in the case of Jonathan Ward, son of Stephen Ward– pension not granted (1)

Ward, Samuel, 21January 1820
Report of the Committee on Pensions and Revolutionary Claims in the case of Samuel Ward– relief granted (1)

Here is a link to a list of claimants for the 17th Congress – Project Update. I’m sure there are even more goodies available.

Want to become a Citizen Archivist?  Check out the Citizen Archivist Dashboard. We wrote about this project as it went live over two years ago. NARA Citizen Archivist Dashboard Live!

Want to keep upon the news from this exciting project?  If so, consider “liking” its Facebook page.




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com


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10 January 2014

National Archives (aka NARA) -- Rubenstein Gallery now open



Earlier this month, the David M. Rubenstein Gallery at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) building in DC opened. It is the home of the new Records of Rights permanent exhibit “which showcases the long struggle to secure and exercise individual rights for all Americans.

The centerpiece of “Records of Rights” is the 1297 Magna Carta, which David [M. Rubenstein] purchased five years ago because he believed the one copy of this famous charter in the United States should not leave this country ...

The three major sections of “Records of Rights” highlight the struggles of Americans to define and realize their civil rights through the stories of African Americans, women, and immigrants. Through documents, photographs, drawings, and films from National Archives holdings, we explore how our forerunners sought to fulfill the promise of freedom set out in our founding documents.”

Next time you are in DC at NARA, consider visiting this exhibit.








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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com


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01 October 2013

National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Library of Congress and other Federal Facilities CLOSED TODAY and until US Federal Government Shutdown Ends ...


used under Creative Commons,  Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The shutdown of the US Federal Government does affect us genealogists both personally and as family history researchers.

Here are two announcements pasted on Facebook (FB) about how we are affected.

If you know of other closures that impact us as we research our ancestors, please post a comment!

Research at the US National Archives
Due to the Federal Government shutdown, the National Archives (www.archives.gov) is closed. We are unable to post or participate in any of our social media channels during this closure. All National Archives facilities are closed, with the exception of the Federal Records Centers and the Federal Register until the Federal government reopens.

The Library of Congress
Due to the temporary shutdown of the federal government, the Library of Congress is closed to the public and researchers beginning Oct. 1, 2013 until further notice. All public events are cancelled and web sites are inaccessible except the legislative information sites THOMAS.gov and beta.congress.gov.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com


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21 August 2013

National Archives (FREE) Virtual Genealogy Fair -- 3-4 September 2013! No excuse not to attend this year!


A few years ago I was able to attend the NARA Genealogy Fair, looked around, attended some sessions, and helped staff the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG) table for a bit.

When I first heard there would be not fair in 2013, due to sequestration, it made me a bit sad as it was such a neat event and showcase for NARA and its holdings and the expertise of its employees.

I am happy to report that NARA has come up with a neat solution – it will hold a “virtual” genealogy fair.  To borrow from my British cousin, this is “brilliant!”  Not only will the fair again be held and it will be available to you regardless of where you live!

+++++++++

WHAT:  National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair
  • For the first time ever, the National Archives will host a virtual Genealogy Fair via webcast using the Internet.
  • This two-day program will showcase tips and techniques for using Federal records at the National Archives for genealogy research. Lectures are designed for experienced genealogy professionals and novices alike.
  • Lecture topics include Native American and African American history, immigration, Civil War pensions, U.S. Colored Troops, and Navy Deck logs.
  • “Help! I’m Stuck” Call-In Consultation: National Archives staff will be available to answer research questions during the Fair.

WHEN:  Tuesday and Wednesday, September 3–4, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. EST

WHO:  Speakers include genealogy experts from the National Archives and U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services.

HOW:  The National Archives will make this event available via webcast. The webcast will include options for the hearing-impaired. Recorded sessions will be available online after the event.

Background:  The National Archives holds the permanently valuable records of the Federal government. These include records of interest to genealogists, such as pension files, ship passenger lists, census and Freedmen’s Bureau materials. For information on National Archives holdings see www.archives.gov.
For more information about the fair, e-mail KYR@nara.gov. Join the Genealogy Fair conversation onTwitter using #genfair2013.

To keep current on the details, check this page, http://www.archives.gov/dc-metro/know-your-records/genealogy-fair/, regularly.

[Update 6:30 EST 21 Aug 2013 -- here is the purported schedule! Thanks to Adventures in Genealogy Education.]



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the Upfront with NGS blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Follow NGS via Facebook, YouTube, Google+, Twitter
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com


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