31 March 2011

Foundation for the National Archives Announces 2011 Research Fellowship


The National Archives is accepting proposals for a research fellowship beginning in July 2011.  Applications will be accepted by email until EDT 31 May 2011 at legislative.archives@nara.gov.  The minimum tenure in residency at the National Archives is one month.

Scope:  Research proposals will be considered on any topic that uses the historical records of Congress housed in the National Archives’ Center for Legislative Archives.  The records of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives support a wide range of topics including immigration policy, committee histories, environmental policy, Congressional investigations, and many issues expressed in eighteenth and nineteenth century petitions to Congress.  The Fellow will be supported by the Center for Legislative Archives staff, and will have the opportunity to consult with the House and Senate history offices.

Criteria:  The National Archives is looking for Ph.D. candidates who have advanced to candidacy and have an approved dissertation proposal at the time of application or individuals who received their Ph.D. within the last five years.  Proposals should be no longer than four single spaced pages and be accompanied by two letters of recommendation.  The proposal should include a publication plan that demonstrates the significance of the proposed research in the field.

The Fellow will be expected to make an initial presentation to National Archives staff and local historians concerning the proposed plan of work and a second presentation on research findings in the first quarter of 2012.  Candidates are encouraged to consult with the Center for Legislative Archives staff in developing their proposal at legislative.archives@nara.gov.  Please put “Fellowship Inquiry” in the subject line.

Stipend:  The total stipend for the Fellowship is $10,000.

Funding for this Fellowship is provided by the Foundation for the National Archives

Selected List of Recent, Significant Publications based on research in Congressional holdings of the Center for Legislative Archives

  • Richard John, Spreading the News:  The American Postal System from Franklin to Morse. (1998)
  • Timothy N. Thurber, The Politics of Equality:  Hubert H. Humphrey and the African American Freedom Struggle. (1999)
  • Julian Zelizer, Taxing America:  Wilbur D. Mills, Congress, and the State, 1945-1975. (2000)
  • Nancy Young, Wright Patman:  Populism, Liberalism, and the American Dream. (2000)
  • Robert Caro, The Years of Lyndon Johnson. Volume 3:  Master of the Senate. (2002)
  • Garrison Nelson, Charles Stewart, and David Cannon, Committees in the U.S. Congress, 1789-1946.  (2002)
  • James C. Olson, Stuart Symington, A Life. (2003)
  • Julian Zelizer, On Capitol Hill:  The Struggle to Reform Congress and Its Consequences, 1948-2000. (2004)
  • Alisse Portnoy, Their Right to Speak:  Women’s Activism in the Indian and Slave Debates. (2005)
  • David Barrett, The CIA and Congress:  the Untold Story from Truman to Kennedy. (2005)
  • Paul Milazzo, Unlikely Environmentalists:  Congress and Clean Water, 1945-1972.  (2006)
  • Jeff Woods, Richard B. Russell:  Southern Nationalism and American Foreign Policy. (2007)
  • Sean Kelly and Scott Frisch, Cheese Factories on the Moon:  Why Earmarks Are Good for American Democracy. (2010)
  • Michael Perino, The Hellhound of Wall Street:  How Ferdinand Pecora’s Investigation of the Great Crash Forever Changed American Finance. (2010)





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30 March 2011

Washington State Library Possible 20% Funding Reduction -- Public Hearing, 31 March 2011


Genealogists should be aware of a bill (HB 2033) that has been introduced in the House to create a new Department of Heritage, Arts, and Culture which would include the Washington State Library but not the Archives and reduce their funding by an estimated 20%. As you know the Secretary of State has been a strong supporter of genealogists and this would remove that support.
For more information you can go to this website: http://apps.leg.wa.gov/billinfo/summary.aspx?year=2011&bill=2033

If you are close enough to
Olympia, you can attend the public hearing on Thursday, 31 March 2011. Otherwise, you may wish to voice your opinion to the sponsors and Committee on State Government and Tribal Affairs.

Alma Greenwood,
Membership Chair
Washington State
Genealogical Society



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25 March 2011

Browsing the NGSQ Archives During Women's History Month

by Toby Webb

Women appear in every genealogy but, because we usually follow surnames, too frequently they appear only as "wife of." March is Women's History Month. What is there in the NGSQ archive of past articles that focuses specifically on the research of women?

In September 2000, an entire special issue was dedicated to "Reassembling Female Lives." National Genealogical Society Quarterly 88 (September 2000). Elizabeth Shown Mills (with Rachel Mills Lennon), Barbara Vines Little, Kay Germain Ingalls, and Kay Haviland Freilich all contributed articles on finding and correctly identifying women in our research.

In 1999, Evidence, one of NGSQ's best known special issues, National Genealogical Society Quarterly 87 (September 1999), included articles showing how to use different types of evidence in genealogical proof arguments. Three of the key articles used cases of female identity to demonstrate evidentiary technique: Helen F.M. Leary, "Resolving Conflicts in Direct Evidence: Identity and Vital Dates of Mary Kittrell," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 87 (September 1999): 199-205; Marya Myers, "Discovering Identity through Indirect Evidence: Elizabeth James of Bristol, Rhode Island," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 87 (September 1999): 206-216 ; and Margaret Amundson, "Rebutting Direct Evidence with Indirect Evidence: The Identity of Sarah (Taliaferro) Lewis of Virginia," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 87 (September 1999): 217-240.

Many NGSQ articles have used questions of female identity to demonstrate problem solving for different ethnicities. A few examples:
  • Dutch: Robert V. Anderson, "The Mother of Mathew Goes (ca. 1660-1663) of Rensselaerwyck," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 74 (June 1986): 119-121.
  • French: Henri E. Carrier, "Resinger and Courteau, The King's Daughters," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 77 (June 1989): 151.
  • Irish: Marya Myers, "Overcoming Irishness in Boston: Anna (Anglin-Pettengill) Merritt's Climb to "Respectability"," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 86 (September 1998): 166-188.       
Others have offered general research methods:
  • Elizabeth Shown Mills, "The Search for Margaret Ball: Building Steps over a Brick-Wall Research Problem," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 77 (March 1989): 43-65.
  • Daisy Schwander, "Finding Origins for Immigrant Females: Chicago's Bertha Roeske and Her Unremembered Mother," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 81 (December 1993): 245-256.
  • Connie Lenzen, "Proving a Maternal Line: The Case of Frances B. Whitney," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 82 (March 1994): 17-31.
  • Sharon DeBartolo Carmack, " Immigrant Women and Family Planning: Historical Perspectives for Genealogical Research," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 84 (June 1996): 102-114.
  • Linda Bennett Johnson, "Name Changes within the Melting Pot: The Search for "Frances Vera Gilmore" of Detroit," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 85 (June 1997): 85-93.
  • Del E. Jupiter, "From Agustina to Ester: Analyzing a Slave Household for Child-Parent Relationships," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 85 (December 1997): 245-275.          
Several articles have taught us more about women we thought we knew:
  • Helen F.M. Leary, "Sally Heming's Children: A Genealogical Analysis of the Evidence," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 89 (September 2001): 165-207.
  • Robert de Berardinis, ""Madame X": Virginie Amelie "Mimi" Avegno (Mme. Gutreau) and a Family Note to Art History," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 90 (March 2002): 65-68.      
And several articles awarded Family History Writing Contest prizes have demonstrated that women make very good narrative subjects:
  • Richard Lee Tolman, "The Life and Times of English Immigrant Priscilla (nee Clark) (Pickett) (Pickett) Wilford," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 94 (December 2006): 267-286.
  • Del E. Jupiter, "Matilda Madrid: One Woman's Tale of Bondage and Freedom," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 91 (March 2003): 41-59.
  • Gwen Boyer Bjorkman, "Hannah (Baskel) Phelps Phelps Hill: A Quaker Woman and Her Offspring," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 75 (December 1987): 289-302.         
NGSQ, it turns out, has long been an important journal for women's history. NGS members can find and download these and many similar articles in the publication archives on the NGS website.


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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National Archives Hosts 7th Genealogy Fair, 20-21 April 2011


WHAT:             The National Archives will host its seventh annual Genealogy Fair:  Become Your Family’s Detective on April 20 and 21, 2011, from to   This year’s two-day program will showcase the diversity of Federal records located at the National Archives as resources for family history research.  Speakers include National Archives staff, historians, and genealogy professionals. This popular fair – which attracted over 2,500 people last year – will provide information and guidance for experienced genealogy professionals and novices alike. The fair is free and open to the public, and presented in partnership with the Foundation for the National Archives and with support from Ancestry.com.

Sessions include workshops on records relating to African-American history, the Civil War, naturalization, courts, the military, immigration, land, and the upcoming opening of the 1940 Census.  For a full schedule of lectures and demonstrations, see:  http://www.archives.gov/dc-metro/know-your-records/genealogy-fair.  Exhibitors include National Archives staff and guest organizations demonstrating how to use Federal records and other resources for genealogical research.
WHEN:             Ribbon Cutting Ceremony, April 20, , Pennsylvania Avenue entrance. Archivist of the United States, David S. Ferriero, will cut the ribbon to open the fair. 

Genealogy Fair: Wednesday and Thursday, April 20-21, 2011,              
                                      
WHERE:           National Archives Research Center Lobby and Pennsylvania Avenue Plaza. 
National Archives Building,
700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC
.
Fair attendees will be given buttons at the Welcome Tent allowing entrance to the building.  Government-issued photo ID or student ID is required to enter the building.  All attendees exiting the building must pass through security screening.
The closest Metro stop is the Archives/Navy Memorial stop on the Yellow and Green lines. The National Archives is fully accessible. To request an accommodation (e.g., sign language interpreter) please e-mail KYR@nara.gov or call 202 357-5333 at least two weeks prior to the event.

WHO:               Speakers include:
professional genealogists Claire Bettag, Jennifer Dondero, and Zack Wilske from USCIS; Harvard University Professor Daniel Carpenter; Quinton Atkinson from Ancestry.com; Gordon Atkinson from Footnote.com; and National Archives experts Elizabeth Carrington, Patrick Connelly, Rebecca Crawford, Damani Davis, John Deeben, Jake Ersland, Jeffery Hartley,  Claire P. Kluskens,  Bill Seibert, Katherine Vollen, Rebecca Warlow, and Reginald Washington. 

National Archives exhibitors include staff demonstrating how to use databases including the Archival Research Catalog (ARC) and Access to Archival Databases (AAD).  Staff at the “Help! I’m Stuck” table will be available to assist researchers. Guest exhibitors include the US Census Bureau, Library of Congress, Ancestry.com, FamilySearch, Footnote.com, and local genealogical societies. 
[Editor’s Note: NGS will be one of the exhibitors!]
Background:  The National Archives holds the permanently valuable records of the Federal government. These include records of interest to genealogists, such as pension files, ship passenger lists, census and Freedmen’s Bureau materials. For information on National Archives holdings see www.archives.gov.
For more information, e-mail KYR@nara.gov.
Follow the Genealogy Fair on Twitter @GenealogyFair
Sign in to the Genealogy Fair on Foursquare!




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23 March 2011

New Online Irish Archives Resource


This web site contains information about archival collections open for public research in Ireland. Its purpose is to aid researchers in finding collections relevant to their studies. The site allows the public to search a wide range of Irish archives online; some of the collections featured include the Irish Film Archive, the Guinness family archives, archives from UCC’s Boole Library and a large number of city and county council archives.

Read this article about this new online Irish archive where
“Brian McGee says one of his personal favourite archives referenced on the site is a recent collection of deeds on properties in Cork city dating back to the 16th and 17th centuries. These deeds were found lying in a skip in the Netherlands.”

Some information is provided about using the site for Family History & Genealogical Research.





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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22 March 2011

ICAPGen Cemetery Grant Program -- Whispers From The Dust

A central mission of the International Commission for the Accreditation of Professional Genealogists (ICAPGen) is “to advance family history/genealogy work around the world by accrediting and promoting genealogy professionals who are competent, ethical, and reliable.”  We have made great strides in mentoring, testing, and accrediting genealogy professionals in recent years.

Many do not realize that another part of the ICAPGen mission is “to work to promote the preservation of genealogical materials.”  Accordingly, we have something exciting to announce…

“Whispers from the Dust” – A Cemetery Grant Program

Cemeteries have always been essential to genealogical research. Unfortunately, headstones, paper burial records, and maps are especially vulnerable to time and elements, and every year more and more are permanently lost. These important records – both maps and burial data – need not be lost forever; technology exists to safeguard them for future generations and make them available to researchers today.

Imagine making a “virtual” visit to a cemetery with an online map that identifies each grave individually.  Imagine clicking on that grave and viewing birth, death, spouse, marriage, and military information along with a headstone photo.  Now, imagine zooming out and identifying everyone buried in adjacent graves. Integrated mapping and data will help solve genealogical puzzles that could not be solved with mere headstone transcriptions.  Off-site backup of digital records safeguard them for future generations.

This exciting and innovative technology is all part of the “Whispers from the Dust” cemetery grant program.

ICAPGen, as a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization, will work with cemeteries that can benefit from a grant to modernize their mapping and data systems. Cemeteries of all sizes will be invited to apply for a grant that will cover up to 90% of the cost of the project. This will be a welcome opportunity for many cemeteries that recognize a need to update and preserve their records but lack the necessary funding. Maps and data from these projects will be uploaded to a central website, easily and freely available to all genealogy researchers.  Visit http://www.namesinstone.com/ to see how the maps and data will be shared online.

We invite you visit http://www.icapgen.org/ for more information, and to learn how you might participate in this program.


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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National Institute for Genealogical Studies Offering FREE Course on Social Media

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies has announced that they will be offering a free course on Social Media. Social Media for the Wise Genealogist is a six week course for students who are interested in learning how social networking can help them as genealogists. It will run starting 4 April and 2 May, 2011. The methodology behind using social network sites will be discussed. 

Do note that there is required course text which is not Free -- Social Networking for Genealogists (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2009) by Drew Smith.

Your National Genealogical Society is already part of several of
the social media outlets -- you can Follow NGS via

To get news about other upcoming genealogy webinars offered throughout the online genealogy community, check out the GeneaWebinars site.


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16 March 2011

Celebrate Genealogy Research Day (Sweden) With FREE Access This Weekend!

 

Celebrate the “Genealogy Research Day with us”


“Genealogy Research Day” (Sweden) will be celebrated around the country again on Saturday, March 19th 2011. In many places the local genealogical societies, archives and libraries will be hosting this event. Genealogy Research Day is a chance for many, both new and experienced genealogy researchers to meet and exchange experiences.

 

Special ADOnLine2 “Genealogy Research Day” free research offer


ArkivDigital and our online service ADOnLine2, will be free of charge this weekend, March 19th to 20th. We hope that this offer also will help genealogical societies and archives to demonstrate, in the best possible way, what modern genealogical research is all about.

 

Special prices on “1 Year” and “2 Years” subscriptions


From March 16th through April 3rd 2011 you can purchase any of these subscriptions at special prices. You have now the opportunity to purchase one year for only 995 SEK (regular price SEK 1195) or two years for only 1750 SEK (regular price SEK 2390). These offers apply only to individuals. (Approximately exchange rates 2011.03.15; 995.00 SEK = 154 USD = 111 EUR)

 

How do I get access to ArkivDigital for free?


To get access to ArkivDigital’s service ADOnLine2 for free, you’ll have to go through a few steps. It’s not difficult and you should be able to make it if you follow the steps below carefully:
  1. Register with us
    • If you are already registered, go to the next paragraph.
    • If you are not registered as a member before, you will have to do the following: Go to: http://www.arkivdigital.net/users/register and fill in the information requested. Be extra careful to write the correct email address and password you choose. The password must be at least 6 characters long.
  2. Install the program ADOnLine2, http://www.arkivdigital.net/products/adonline/installation. If you do not have the latest version, we advise you to install it now. The latest version is called 1.4.1 (rev 511). You can check which version you have if you have the application running, press the “Hjälp” (Help) menu and then click “Om” (About).
  3. During installation, you will be asked some questions. You must respond to them "positively" and when the installation is complete, you will have a new icon on your desktop called ADOnLine2.
  4. Double-click the icon to start the program.
  5. Now the login box appears. Please enter your login information (email and password). Be sure to enter exactly the same way as you did when you registered. It is a difference between capital and lowercase letters. If you receive an error regarding “e-post/lösenord” (email address/password) there is something wrong. Click to clear the error messages and then on the File menu and login. Now, the login box appears again. Erase all information and fill in the information again.
  6. Once you have logged in you can start your research.
  7. To the left is a list of records archive holders. Search for "your" parish in the list or type it directly into the search field above. Click on the name to choose.
  8. To the right a list of volumes from your chosen parish appears. Search for the right volume in the list and double click the left mouse button to open the volume.
  9. When the volume is opened, you can browse by clicking the -5, -1, +1 and +5 buttons or make a direct choice in the drop-down list (between the -1 and +1 buttons).
  10. On the installation page you will also find a manual for the program.

Frequently asked questions and problems

  • I already have a subscription – How can I benefit from this offer?
    Answer: We will extend all current subscriptions with two extra days for free.
  • If you have problems with the program and want help, please give us as much information as possible in your first contact with us; which version you use and what type of operation caused the error. Please include the information of any error messages. The more information you can supply the quicker we can help you – thank you in advance
  • If you want to try to solve the problem on your own you can try to install an older version of the program. At the bottom of the Setup page we provide links to older versions. Sometimes they work better.
  • If you have automatic login checked and are receiving an error message regarding “e-post/lösenord” (email address/password), Click to clear the error messages and then on the “Arkiv” menu (File), then click “Logga In” (Log in). Now, the login box appears again. Erase all information and type them in again carefully.

Support

During the weekend we will answer questions as soon as we can. Sometimes there is a lot of questions and it may take a little while before you get an answer, but we will answer all questions. It is always best to send questions via email to: kundtjanst@arkivdigital.se





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15 March 2011

March is Women's History Month


Per a web-site created by The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and the Holocaust Memorial Museum

“Before the 1970’s, the topic of women’s history was largely missing from general public consciousness. To address this situation, the Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (California) Commission on the Status of Women initiated a “Women’s History Week” celebration in 1978 and chose the week of March 8 to coincide with International Women’s Day.

… In 1981, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Rep. Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) cosponsored the first Joint Congressional Resolution proclaiming a “Women’s History Week.”

In 1987, the National Women’s History Project petitioned Congress to expand the celebration to the entire month of March. Since then, the National Women’s History Month Resolution has been approved every year with bipartisan support in both the House and Senate.”


The theme for this year’s month-long celebration of women in history is Our History is Our Strength.

Check out these resources:

Has your state library or archive created a special web-site?  Do you know of other women-focused web-sites of particular use to those researching genealogy and family history?  If so, please share those with us!




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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