21 October 2014

In the 1900s Many of Your Ancestors Worked, as Children, in Factories, Mines and Other Dangerous Places




Some of the most disturbing images that were captured in the early part of the 1900s were those of kids working in factories, coal mines, and other places where no kids belonged. The most famous photographer was Lewis Hine; his pictures brought these children into the spotlight in a way the nation could no longer ignore.

There is a video at the end with many images of child laborers ... they didn’t have childhoods like what many of us had. It’s well worth taking 3.5 minutes to watch it.  Maybe some of your ancestors were child laborers and worked under these conditions.

You can check out more images in the National Child Labor Committee Collection (Library of Congress). I searched on Salem Massachusetts since my ancestors were emigrating between 1900-1910 into that community.  Many of the photos do identify who the children were.

This website, The History Place, also has a webpage devoted to Child Labor in America 1908-1912, Photographs of Lewis W. Hine.  I also found this website interesting, Child Labor Public Education ProjectUpfront with NGS previously talked a bit about this same project in the post Photo + Genealogy Sleuthing = 100+ Year Mystery Solved.

This is a reminder that as we do our research, we have to consider the time and the place and what were considered the norms.  You cannot look at your life now and use that as the benchmark for your ancestors.  Do learn the history of where they lived, what was acceptable and not.  Though we may not agree with child labor, there also used to be laws on the books that might be nice if we still had them such not swearing in public (you could be fined), etc

Do you know if your ancestors worked as child laborers?  If so, doing what?




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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17 October 2014

Upfront Mini Bytes -- Laws, Cook County (IL) Cemetery, British Currency, New Zealand WWI, Tennessee Bible, OH Death Records, IA Newspapers, NH Maps & Atlases

Welcome to our newest edition of our periodic feature Upfront Mini Bytes.  In Upfront Mini Bytes we provide eight tasty bits of genealogy news that will help give you a deeper byte into your family history research. Each item is short and sweet.  We encourage you to check out the links to articles, blog posts, resources, and anything genealogical!

We hope you found the past editions helpful.  Use your favorite search engine with “Upfront with NGS” “Mini Bytes” or use this Google search link.

Do you have questions, suggestions for future posts, or comments?  Please post a comment or send an e-mail to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org.

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Laws are important.  Free access to legal information is great.  Check out this great collaboration between the Law Library of Congress and the legal publishing company William S. Hein & Co., Inc. as described by The Legal Genealogist.

Burials for the Cook County Cemetery at Dunning, IL are now online!  With over 38,000 burials spanning some seventy years, it served as an institutional cemetery for the Cook County institutions. These consisted of the County Poor house and farm opened 1854, the Insane Asylum opened 1869, the infirmary opened 1882, and the Consumptive hospital (TB), opened 1899 and was the official Cook County potters field serving the poor and indigent of the county. Read the article, Database Remembers Chicagoans Buried, Forgotten in Dunning Cemetery, to learn more.

A research challenge we run into is when currency changes. How do we get a grasp on obsolete currency? The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History (ISBGFH) has posted a nice & short summary of Post- and pre-decimalization monetary units (covering British currency).

New Zealand now has more than 140,000 World War 1 service files online. Search the database here. Read more about the project here.

Tennessee research has just gotten easier.  More than 1500 bible records are available on the website of the Tennessee State Library and Archives. You can access the project here and read more about it here.

The Ohio History Connection’s State Archives’ online catalog of death records has expanded. On October 1, the Ohio Department of Health transferred nearly two million death certificates from the years 1954 to 1963 to the Ohio History Connection.

Fort Dodge (Iowa) newspaper archive is now online. It covers 56 local and area newspapers and publications for the years 1856-1934.

The University of New Hampshire has some neat Maps & Atlases online with the earliest item a Gazetteer of the state of New Hampshire from 1817.  






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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16 October 2014

Home Movie Day is Saturday (18 Oct) -- Let's Celebrate!


Saturday is Home Movie Day!

Home Movie Day is a celebration of amateur films and filmmaking held annually at many local venues worldwide. Home Movie Day events provide the opportunity for individuals and families to see and share their own home movies with an audience of their community, and to see their neighbors’ in turn. It’s a chance to discover why to care about these films and to learn how best to care for them.

See if there are events being held where you live by clicking here.  Do recognize that not all events will be held Saturday -- there are some already taking place.  So, do check the calendar ASAP.

I was reminded of this celebration by a poster for Triangle Home Movie Day 2014 (see poster below) posted at my home away from home in downtown Raleigh (State Archives of NC).



Past posts about this day as celebrated in a few years ago ...



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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15 October 2014

DAR Library Eliminates Entrance Fee



We like short and sweet and especially when it involves $ or not having to pay $.

From Eric G. Grundset, Library Director, DAR Library, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, we learn ...

After many decades of having an entrance fee, the DAR Library in Washington, D. C. has dropped the fee effective immediately. We want to encourage usage by more people who were sometimes deterred by having to pay a fee to use the library.

The DAR Library has many online and offline resources of interesting to genealogists.  Check out all it has to offer and when you are in DC, do pay a visit.  

As stated on the website ...

Since its founding in 1896, the DAR Library has grown into a specialized collection of American genealogical and historical manuscripts and publications, as well as powerful on-site databases. The DAR Library collection contains over 185,000 books, 300,000 research files, thousands of manuscript items, and special collections of African American, Native American, and women’s history, genealogy and culture. Nearly 30,000 family histories and genealogies comprise a major portion of the book collection, many of which are unique or available in only a few libraries in the country.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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14 October 2014

Doing a House History (aka Genealogy of a House) -- FREE Guide & other resources

Source: House Histories, House and Suburban Histories from South East Queensland, http://www.househistories.org/ 

Though we often find ourselves researching the people in our family, we sometimes find ourselves researching the history of a house.

I first talked to you about the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office in the post Historic Preservation Maps Can be Invaluable to Genealogists where I talk about HPOWEB, a GIS map service which identifies identified historic properties.

They’ve now created a neat & FREE resource, Genealogy of a House: Sources for Researching the History of Your House.  I also suggest that you check out House Histories – How to Trace the Genealogy of Your Home or Other Building (About.com, Kimberly Powell), Researching Historic Washington, D.C., Buildings (Library of Congress), and House Histories – House and Suburban Histories from South East Queensland, for perspectives on the tools and techniques for researching a house history.

Though the focus of the publications are NC, DC, and Australia, they all provide valuable insight into how to perform the genealogy of a house and some of the tools which may aid you in that pursuit..  Additionally, if these resources exist for doing a house history in these locales, maybe your state or the state you’re interested in has similar resources available to researchers.

Have you done a house history?  What resources were invaluable?



Related posts ...




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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13 October 2014

US Census also tells the stories of towns and communities



We often use census data as a tool to research our family members, and focus almost exclusively on learning more about them. An article by Justin Pot (Make Use of), Your Town Has A Story, Here’s How Census Data Can Help You See It.

A coal miner earning $540 a year lived near downtown Boulder, Colorado in 1940. One of his neighbours, a cook at a frat house, earned a little more: $770. If you live in Boulder, as I do, you’d know that even adjusted for inflation that kind of pay wouldn’t cover rent here in 2014. Clearly this town has changed a lot – something any longtime local will tell you.

I learned this, and a lot of other fascinating things, by exploring census data for my town. Here’s how you can do your own research – it’s easy, I promise.

His article reminds us that census data can tell us much more and provide great context to our understanding of a community at the time an ancestor lived there

What he calls the Census Tool is one of the wonderful resources created by Stephen P Morse, creator of numerous One-Step Webpages, and in this case Joel D Weintraub --- The Unified (Year) Census ED Finder.

Do also check out the United States Census Bureau, Data Tools and Apps page for quite a collection of interesting and useful resources.

Even if the tools mentioned are not new to you, sometimes we need reminding of the rich data the census provides us with.  Whether you are getting a sense of a neighborhood, its composition, cost of living, etc, for your personal history research project or doing a house history, census date is an invaluable “snapshot” of the U.S. as a country, a collection of states, our many counties, individual towns, right on down to the personal level of each individual enumerated.




Editor’s Note: Thanks to Dick Eastman (EOGN) and one of his readers for bringing this to our attention.







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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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10 October 2014

Today is Electronic Records Day. Are your electronic records at risk?




Today is Electronic Records Day!

I was reminded of this by a post from the State Archives of North Carolina (my home away from home!), 10/10 is Electronic Records Day.

With electronic records so pervasive in our modern life, it’s important to understand such records and how to manage and preserve them.

Though the post focuses on electronic records created by state employees and that any document created in connection with transacting public business is a public record, the issues discussed are just as applicable to you and I.  Do check out the little loop videos – I know I’ve been there! 

Here are some useful resources from the Council of State Archivists:
  • 10 Reasons for E-Records, 2014 (Word) (PDF)
  • Government E-Records Tips (Word) (PDF)
  • Personal E-Records Tips (Word) (PDF)

Check out this post by the Society of American Archivists, October 10 (1010) is Electronic Records Day!  It shares 10 reasons why electronic records need special attention.  Every single one of these apply to YOU and your PERSONAL electronic records!

Let’s all be safe and future minded!  Preserve your electronic records.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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