24 October 2014

ICAPGen Celebrates 50 Years At their Fall Conference on November 1!



The International Commission for the Accreditation of Professional Genealogists (ICAPGen) will be holding their annual Fall Conference on Saturday, November 1st on the campus of Brigham Young University in Provo, UT. The conference will be celebrating 50 years of accreditation. There will be seven different daylong tracks featuring 42 speakers. General registration for the full, daylong conference is $70 and includes the gala full luncheon.

The tracks include:

Preparing for Accreditation
Methodology/Records
Internet/Technology
Professional Research
DNA/Genetic Genealogy

National Genealogical Society (NGS) Board member, Angie Bush MS (Biotechnology), will be teaching and coordinating the Genetic Genealogy track. The track will focus on helping genealogists incorporate DNA testing into their research plans, and for professionals -- into their client reports. This is the first time ICAPGen has offered a DNA track. Genetic genealogy is currently one of the hottest topics at national seminars and events, with classes filling up and selling out quickly. This daylong opportunity is one not to be missed by genealogists looking to understand this exciting new source.

David Rencher, Chief Genealogical Officer for Family Search, will be presenting the keynote address. Other speakers include Ancestry.com’s Crista Cowan and Kory Meyerink. Additional information about the conference, presenters and tracks can be found at www.ica,pgen.org.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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23 October 2014

Who are the Welsh? Mass genetic testing to find out nation's ancestry



An interesting project is underway ...

CymruDNAWales will carry out an unprecedented mass survey of Wales’s ancestry to trace the origins of its people – back beyond written records to the end of the last ice age around 9,000BC when colossal glacial shifts gouged out our landscape and allowed the first immigrants to settle here.

You can learn more here.

Apparently a similar project was undertaken in 2012 in Scotland.

I am familiar with The Genographic Project ... “advanced DNA analysis and worked with indigenous communities to help answer fundamental questions about where humans originated and how we came to populate the Earth.”

I also remember reading, Faroe Islands Aim to Sequence Genes of Entire Country.  This project was undertaken with a health focus and the future use of genomic medicine.

It will be interesting to see where these projects go and what they learn.


Are there other mass survey DNA projects that have taken place or are occurring now to identify the deep ancestry of a particular locale or people?


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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22 October 2014

(UK News) Relatives of adopted adults now able to trace family tree



This is great news from the UK. Whether adoptees or those who gave children up for adoption want to reach out and connect, health information about an adoptee’s birth family has long been desired by adopted individuals.  They may want to know whether they have inherited a genetic tendency towards particular health issues and conditions.

Children, grandchildren and other relatives of adopted adults can now trace back through their ancestors’ lives - helping them to unearth their family history, discover more about their medical background and reach out to long-lost relatives under new rules introduced today [24 September 2014]...

For example, those who have lost a parent to cancer or a heart problem will be able to discover whether their grandparents or other birth relatives suffered from the same condition, giving them the chance to seek advice and support.

These rules will come into force by November 2014.  Read more here.

This 2012 document gives you a sense of US Access to Adoption Records – who can access and under what circumstances.  If you know of a more updated version, please post a comment.

This got me curious about whether any US Archives have adoption records that are publicly available?!?!  I learned that Utah law permits public access to adoption records over 100 years old. It also appears that in Oregon, the Oregon Laws published biennially, included reports of adoptions from 1864 through 1919 when the law was repealed.

Does your state archive provide easy access to historic adoption records?




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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21 October 2014

In the 1900s Many of Your Ancestors Worked, as Children, in Factories, Mines and Other Dangerous Places




Some of the most disturbing images that were captured in the early part of the 1900s were those of kids working in factories, coal mines, and other places where no kids belonged. The most famous photographer was Lewis Hine; his pictures brought these children into the spotlight in a way the nation could no longer ignore.

There is a video at the end with many images of child laborers ... they didn’t have childhoods like what many of us had. It’s well worth taking 3.5 minutes to watch it.  Maybe some of your ancestors were child laborers and worked under these conditions.

You can check out more images in the National Child Labor Committee Collection (Library of Congress). I searched on Salem Massachusetts since my ancestors were emigrating between 1900-1910 into that community.  Many of the photos do identify who the children were.

This website, The History Place, also has a webpage devoted to Child Labor in America 1908-1912, Photographs of Lewis W. Hine.  I also found this website interesting, Child Labor Public Education ProjectUpfront with NGS previously talked a bit about this same project in the post Photo + Genealogy Sleuthing = 100+ Year Mystery Solved.

This is a reminder that as we do our research, we have to consider the time and the place and what were considered the norms.  You cannot look at your life now and use that as the benchmark for your ancestors.  Do learn the history of where they lived, what was acceptable and not.  Though we may not agree with child labor, there also used to be laws on the books that might be nice if we still had them such not swearing in public (you could be fined), etc

Do you know if your ancestors worked as child laborers?  If so, doing what?




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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17 October 2014

Upfront Mini Bytes -- Laws, Cook County (IL) Cemetery, British Currency, New Zealand WWI, Tennessee Bible, OH Death Records, IA Newspapers, NH Maps & Atlases

Welcome to our newest edition of our periodic feature Upfront Mini Bytes.  In Upfront Mini Bytes we provide eight tasty bits of genealogy news that will help give you a deeper byte into your family history research. Each item is short and sweet.  We encourage you to check out the links to articles, blog posts, resources, and anything genealogical!

We hope you found the past editions helpful.  Use your favorite search engine with “Upfront with NGS” “Mini Bytes” or use this Google search link.

Do you have questions, suggestions for future posts, or comments?  Please post a comment or send an e-mail to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org.

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Laws are important.  Free access to legal information is great.  Check out this great collaboration between the Law Library of Congress and the legal publishing company William S. Hein & Co., Inc. as described by The Legal Genealogist.

Burials for the Cook County Cemetery at Dunning, IL are now online!  With over 38,000 burials spanning some seventy years, it served as an institutional cemetery for the Cook County institutions. These consisted of the County Poor house and farm opened 1854, the Insane Asylum opened 1869, the infirmary opened 1882, and the Consumptive hospital (TB), opened 1899 and was the official Cook County potters field serving the poor and indigent of the county. Read the article, Database Remembers Chicagoans Buried, Forgotten in Dunning Cemetery, to learn more.

A research challenge we run into is when currency changes. How do we get a grasp on obsolete currency? The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History (ISBGFH) has posted a nice & short summary of Post- and pre-decimalization monetary units (covering British currency).

New Zealand now has more than 140,000 World War 1 service files online. Search the database here. Read more about the project here.

Tennessee research has just gotten easier.  More than 1500 bible records are available on the website of the Tennessee State Library and Archives. You can access the project here and read more about it here.

The Ohio History Connection’s State Archives’ online catalog of death records has expanded. On October 1, the Ohio Department of Health transferred nearly two million death certificates from the years 1954 to 1963 to the Ohio History Connection.

Fort Dodge (Iowa) newspaper archive is now online. It covers 56 local and area newspapers and publications for the years 1856-1934.

The University of New Hampshire has some neat Maps & Atlases online with the earliest item a Gazetteer of the state of New Hampshire from 1817.  






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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16 October 2014

Home Movie Day is Saturday (18 Oct) -- Let's Celebrate!


Saturday is Home Movie Day!

Home Movie Day is a celebration of amateur films and filmmaking held annually at many local venues worldwide. Home Movie Day events provide the opportunity for individuals and families to see and share their own home movies with an audience of their community, and to see their neighbors’ in turn. It’s a chance to discover why to care about these films and to learn how best to care for them.

See if there are events being held where you live by clicking here.  Do recognize that not all events will be held Saturday -- there are some already taking place.  So, do check the calendar ASAP.

I was reminded of this celebration by a poster for Triangle Home Movie Day 2014 (see poster below) posted at my home away from home in downtown Raleigh (State Archives of NC).



Past posts about this day as celebrated in a few years ago ...



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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15 October 2014

DAR Library Eliminates Entrance Fee



We like short and sweet and especially when it involves $ or not having to pay $.

From Eric G. Grundset, Library Director, DAR Library, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, we learn ...

After many decades of having an entrance fee, the DAR Library in Washington, D. C. has dropped the fee effective immediately. We want to encourage usage by more people who were sometimes deterred by having to pay a fee to use the library.

The DAR Library has many online and offline resources of interesting to genealogists.  Check out all it has to offer and when you are in DC, do pay a visit.  

As stated on the website ...

Since its founding in 1896, the DAR Library has grown into a specialized collection of American genealogical and historical manuscripts and publications, as well as powerful on-site databases. The DAR Library collection contains over 185,000 books, 300,000 research files, thousands of manuscript items, and special collections of African American, Native American, and women’s history, genealogy and culture. Nearly 30,000 family histories and genealogies comprise a major portion of the book collection, many of which are unique or available in only a few libraries in the country.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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