16 February 2018

The National Genealogical Society Opens Registration for a Guided Research Trip to Two of our Nation’s Important Repositories



The National Genealogical Society Opens Registration for a Guided Research Trip to Two of our Nation’s Important Repositories 


FALLS CHURCH, VA, 15 FEBRUARY 2018—Explore the Wisconsin Historical Society Library and Archives—one of our nation’s most extensive repositories—and the Max Kade Institute, a notable source of German and German American research materials. Sign up today for the National Genealogical Society (NGS) guided research trip to Madison, Wisconsin, 6–10 August 2018. Registration is limited to thirty participants.


The Wisconsin Historical Society (WHS) Library and Archives’ genealogy and history collections are national in scope, including records of people who lived or passed through its territory as well as throughout the U.S. Its collection of newspapers, journals, magazines, and union and guilds publications from around the country is only surpassed by the Library of Congress. The Society’s Draper collection of 491 volumes (ca. 1775-1815) concentrates on the area known as "Trans-Allegheny West," including the western Carolinas and Virginia, some portions of Georgia and Alabama, the entire Ohio River valley, and parts of the Mississippi River valley.


Family historians will find material on Native American tribes, French-Canadians, Northern Europeans—primarily from Germany and Norway—African Americans, Asians, and Hispanics, all which called Wisconsin home. Records also cover the rise and diminution of miners, loggers, and railroad workers, and once held Confederate prisoners of war during the Civil War. Researchers also will discover records on Wisconsin’s northern neighbor Canada. In all, the WHS houses more than four million records and serves as the Wisconsin State Archives. The Wisconsin State Archives include state, county, and local government records. Land deeds, naturalization records, tax rolls, and court documents are just some of the original records that genealogists can access at the Archives.


Family historians with ancestors from Germany will be especially interested in visiting the Max Kade Institute. It has a robust collection of German-American newspapers, letters, diaries, and church and business records. The Institute is also an excellent resource for locating historic German-language, European towns and villages.


For genealogists with ancestors from Norway, Madison is home to the Norwegian American Genealogical Center & Naeseth Library. Its resources include emigration lists, Norwegian farm histories and topographical maps, printed histories, and files with information on obituaries, wedding and birth announcements, feature stories, and other events.  

Research consultants Rev. David McDonald, DMin, CG, and Patricia Walls Stamm, CG, CGLSM ; insure that your introduction to these institutions is both productive and enriching while conducting your personal research.


The trip includes:

  • Online orientation to prepare for your research trip to Madison;
  • Four nights at the Lowell Center, including daily continental breakfast and free internet in rooms;
  • Meet and greet on Monday afternoon at the hotel;
  • Orientation and tour at the repositories;
  • Four days of personal research;
  • Individual research consultations with group leaders throughout the trip;
  • Fees, taxes, and gratuities (unless otherwise stated).

Space is limited to only 30 individuals. To make your reservation or to learn more, visit https://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/conferences_events/research_trips/wi_research_trip .

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Falls Church, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.


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The words Certified Genealogist and its acronym, CG, are a registered certification mark, and the designations Certified Genealogical Lecturer and its acronym, CGL, are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 6400 Arlington Blvd, Suite 810, Falls Church, VA 22042-2318. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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08 February 2018

The National Genealogical Society Announces Three Research Trips



The National Genealogical Society
 Announces Three Research Trips 


FALLS CHURCH, VA, 8 FEBRUARY 2018—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) invites individuals who are researching their family history to sign up for one or more of its upcoming research trips. NGS genealogy scholars will introduce you to, and help guide your research at, renowned repositories in Madison, Wisconsin; Washington, D.C.; and Salt Lake City, Utah.

This year, NGS will visit:
  • The Wisconsin Historical Society Library and Archives—one of our nation’s most extensive repositories—and the Max Kade Institute, a notable source of German and German American research materials in Madison, Wisconsin, 5–10 August 2018; 
  • Three research facilities in Washington, D.C. —The National Archives, the DAR Library, and the Library of Congress, 4–10 November 2018; 
  • The internationally recognized Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, 27 January–3 February 2019.

Each research trip features: 
  • Experienced genealogists familiar with the repositories and the records they hold;
  • Online orientation to help prepare researchers for the repositories that they will visit; 
  • Meet and greet session with other researchers on the day of arrival; 
  • Research facility orientation;
  • Private research consultations with research trip leaders;
  • Hotel accommodations for the trip's duration with extra nights available at an additional cost;
  • Various complementary services at the hotel (see individual trip for particular details);
  • Fees, taxes, and gratuities (unless otherwise stated).

Learn from the experts how to search for documentation about your ancestors in these renowned institutions.  Visit the NGS website at https://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/research_trips to learn more about each research trip. Individual trip package prices vary depending upon the room occupancy and National Genealogical Society member status. Transportation to the location is not included. Payment is required, in full, at the time of registration. 

Each trip limits the number of participants and tends to become fully booked quickly, so mark your calendar to register early. Registration for the research trips open as follows:
  • Madison, Wisconsin, 15 February 2018
  • Washington, D.C., 1 March 2018
  • Salt Lake City, Utah, 15 March 2018

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Falls Church, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.


#     #     #


The words Certified Genealogist and its acronym, CG, are a registered certification mark, and the designations Certified Genealogical Lecturer and its acronym, CGL, are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 6400 Arlington Blvd, Suite 810, Falls Church, VA 22042-2318. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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31 January 2018

The National Genealogical Society Has Moved



The National Genealogical Society Has Moved

FALLS CHURCH, VA, 31 JANUARY 2018—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) moved to a new office in early January 2018. NGS didn’t go far, just five miles from Arlington to Falls Church, Virginia. The new space is smaller but technologically more up-to-date. The staff are still unpacking boxes and making sure the historical files are intact, so please have patience in the coming weeks as they complete all the tasks associated with moving an office.

NGS is on the move in other ways too. It will be tackling another big project in the coming year, upgrading and updating its website. The new website will give members and the genealogical community fresh educational content to help everyone achieve their research goals and build strong and accurate family trees. Look for enhanced functionality, including a more robust search engine, new content, easier navigation, and improved integration.

NGS also has new publications and online courses planned for 2018, as well as research trips, and a blockbuster family history conference in Grand Rapids, Michigan, from 2-5 May 2018. 

Make sure you update your contact lists with NGS’s new mailing address: 6400 Arlington Blvd., Suite 810, Falls Church, VA 22042-2318 USA. The telephone numbers remain the same. Tel. 703-525-0050 or 800-473-0060.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Falls Church, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 6400 Arlington Blvd, Suite 810, Falls Church, VA 22042-2318. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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29 January 2018

Alison Hare and Nancy Peters to Succeed NGSQ Editors Tom Jones and Melinde Lutz Byrne in 2019



Alison Hare and Nancy Peters to Succeed NGSQ Editors Tom Jones and Melinde Lutz Byrne in 2019

FALLS CHURCH, VA, 29 JANUARY 2018—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) has named Alison Hare, CG®, and Nancy A. Peters, CG, CGLSM, as co-editors of its National Genealogical Society Quarterly (NGSQ) beginning with the March 2019 issue.  They take the reins of editorial responsibility for this prestigious publication from retiring editors Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA, and Melinde Lutz Byrne, CG, FASG, who will continue as co-editors through the publication of the December 2018 issue. 

“NGS is profoundly grateful to Tom and Melinde, who have served as co-editors since 2002 and 2006, respectively,” said NGS President Ben Spratling, JD. “During their tenure, they ensured that NGSQ maintained the highest standards of scholarly articles, including genealogies, case studies, essays on new methodology, and critical book reviews. I know that Tom and Melinde share the NGS Board’s enthusiasm in welcoming Nancy and Alison as the journal’s incoming co-editors.”

Nancy Peters, of Aiken, South Carolina, serves as a trustee for the Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) and is the editor of its newsletter, OnBoard. A full-time professional genealogist, she has conducted in-depth genealogical research to solve complex “brick wall” problems of identity and kinship for clients. Her research focused primarily in England, New York, and southeastern U.S. She has been a lecturer at the NGS Family History Conference and an instructor for the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy and the BCG Education Fund on skillbuilding topics and genealogy standards. Her articles have appeared in NGSQ and the Utah Genealogical Association’s Crossroads magazine. When asked about her forthcoming role as co-editor of NGSQ, she said, “The journal’s leadership role in publishing quality case studies and family histories is well recognized by our community. It will be an honor to serve as its co-editor.”

Alison Hare, of Nepean, Ontario, has served as a trustee for BCG since 2009. She honed her writing and editing skills during twelve years as a journalist and as an editor for Southam News, Canada’s premier wire service. In addition to providing ad hoc editorial assistance to BCG’s OnBoard newsletter, she contributed to the revision and development of genealogical standards as a member of BCG’s standards manual committee, 2013—2014. She has lectured at several NGS Family History Conferences. Among the topics Hare presented were citations and a case study illustrating the use of the Genealogical Proof Standard.  She chaired NGS’s newsletter competition in 2007 and 2008.  Her professional and personal genealogical research has encompassed the United States as well as Canada, England, Ireland, and Scotland. When asked about NSGQ, she said, “NGSQ has played an important role in my personal development, inspiring me with its high quality and continual demonstration of approaches to solve genealogical problems. It is an unexpected honor to serve as its co-editor.”

Thomas W. Jones has pursued his family's history since age fifteen. He is an award-winning genealogical researcher, writer, editor, and educator. He is also a professor emeritus at Gallaudet University, where he designed and managed graduate programs, conducted research, and taught and mentored graduate students for twenty-seven years. Jones, a former trustee and past president of BCG, has taught genealogical courses, including documentation, writing, and advanced genealogical methods at Boston University, Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh, Institute on Genealogy and Historical Research, Western Institute of Genealogy, and elsewhere. He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles as well as the best-selling NGS textbooks Mastering Genealogical Proof and Mastering Genealogical Documentation. This year will mark his sixteenth year as co-editor of NGSQ. “I've enjoyed learning from every author and co-editor I've worked with,” Jones recently noted. “Helping authors ready their work for publication and to benefit NGSQ's readership has been immensely rewarding.”

Melinde Lutz Byrne has been a genealogist, author, consultant, and editor since 1976. She has authored and co-authored thirty books and more than sixty articles as well as numerous editorials and reviews. She is the director for genealogical programs at Excelsior College and at Boston University (BU), including BU’s Essentials, its Genealogical Research Certificate Program, and the Summer Seminar Series. Drawing on her subject matter expertise in forensic genealogy, Byrne has worked with local law enforcement on “John or Jane Doe” cold cases and with estate lawyers on missing heir cases. She is a former president of the American Society of Genealogists. “In my long career as an editor,” Byrne said, “I can sincerely say that the collaboration with Dr. Jones has been my career highpoint. Our strengths and backgrounds were complementary, our discipline in tune, and the results were solid scholarship in a rapidly evolving field.  Nancy and Alison will bring very similar combinations to NGSQ and will continue to provide the readership with examples of the very best in current research.”




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 6400 Arlington Blvd, Suite 810, Falls Church, VA 22042-2318. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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12 January 2018

NGS Awards



Do You Know A Genealogist or Organization
Deserving of Recognition?

Hurry! Deadline for NGS Awards Nominations is 31 January 2018


Many genealogists and organizations serve our community selflessly for the greater good of the field of genealogy. If you stop to think about it, you will probably be able to name quite a few of them. They advance and support family history in hundreds of small ways and often by giving countless hours to local, regional, and national societies. They give time and money to planning, leading, and working on projects that have revolutionized our access to genealogy related materials by indexing and digitizing records, creating free websites and webinars, writing articles, lecturing, chairing conferences, blogging, designing materials, leading special interest groups, and creating communications and newsletters to share with colleagues and the public at large.

Each year the National Genealogical Society recognizes excellence in the genealogy field with an awards program to honor deserving individuals and organizations. Unfortunately, we receive far too few nominations, given the work of so many. We want to recognize the contributions to our field, but we need your help to do so. When you take the time to nominate an individual or organization, you help the NGS Awards program continue to remind us of and celebrate the volunteerism, scholarship, and achievements in genealogy of those who have made outstanding contributions to NGS programs or have performed exceptional work in the field of genealogy, history, biography, or heraldry. 

Please consider showing your appreciation of one or more individuals, a deserving organization, or an NGS volunteer by nominating them for an award. You still have time to submit a nomination for a number of NGS Awards, including:

  • NGS Award of Merit
  • The Shirley Langdon Wilcox Award for Exemplary Volunteerism
  • NGS Distinguished Service Award
  • The Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship (sponsored by ProQuest)
  • National Genealogy Hall of Fame
  • Fellow of the National Genealogical Society

The deadline is 31 January 2018. (Competition submissions closed 15 December 2017.) Winners for this year will be recognized at the NGS Family History Conference to be held May 2-5, 2018 in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Descriptions of the awards and requirements can be found by visiting the NGS website for information about nominations and submissions and to view the calendar and deadlines for awards and competitions. On the home page, click “Awards.”

Complete details and all necessary forms can be found at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/awards_competitions.

You will receive an acknowledgement that your award nomination has been received. If you do not receive an acknowledgement, or have questions, contact Chuck Mason, NGS Awards Chair, at awards@ngsgenealogy.org.

NGS Awards are administered by the NGS Awards Committee, which sets deadlines for the receipt of nominations. Nominations are submitted to the NGS Awards Committee, which reviews and evaluates the nominations.

All nominations must include e-mail contact information for nominees and the persons nominating them.

Send nomination forms by postal service or e-mail.
NGS Awards Program
6400 Arlington Blvd, Suite 810
Falls Church, VA 22042-2318

Include "NGS AWARD" in the Subject line of your message.


Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia- based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 6400 Arlington Blvd, Suite 810, Falls Church, Virginia 22042-2318. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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11 January 2018

NGS Magazine Volume 43, Number 4


The October–December 2017 issue of NGS Magazine has been mailed to members and is available online in the Members Only section of the website. The theme is "Search Strategies." 


EDITOR’S NOTE by Deb Cyprych 
This issue focuses on strategies to locate unindexed, underindexed, and misindexed records, and on specialized indexes and search techniques that can bring hidden records into view. 

J. Mark Lowe examines indexing methods and the potential for errors. Understanding how an index was created can help researchers determine whether names should appear and develop workaround steps to find misindexed names. 

Five billion unindexed digital records are online at FamilySearch. Robert Raymond explains techniques for finding record sets and a systematic process to navigate to a specific image—essential knowledge since FamilySearch microfilm is no longer being distributed. 

Juliana Szucs reveals why some records on Ancestry aren’t searchable and details strategies for accessing them. Her tips for successfully using the site include searching collections individually, learning what facts are indexed for particular records, locating unindexed records, and working with available indexes.
Dockets can be used as consolidated indexes for court records. Liz Stratton highlights the value of seven types of probate records and demonstrates how to find and use dockets on FamilySearch to locate all records for an estate.
Jordan Jones suggests a methodology for Internet searches, recounts the foundation of Internet navigation and search, provides samples of search syntax, and presents a case study in which he narrows results of a Google search from fifty-­one million to seven.
Claire Prechtel Kluskens guides users through the National Archives Catalog, a web-based tool for locating federal records useful for genealogical and historical research. The catalog contains seventy­-five million entries and thirty­-seven million images of records.
Kathy Petlewski describes the evolution and uses of the sometimes overlooked but valuable Periodical Source Index (known as PERSI) and its two million entries indexing eight thousand periodicals from the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, and Ireland.
Wrapping up this issue, Theresa Fitzgerald discusses auxiliary records in the National Archives that provide information about World War I veterans, Fiona Fitzsimons continues her series on Irish religious records, and Diahan Southard portrays the ability of mitochondrial DNA to connect ancient and modern generations. 


Table of Contents

Features
  • NGS 2018 Conference Program Highlights by Janet A. Alpert, FNGS
  • Four Ways to Give Back to the Genealogical Community by Aaron Goodwin, Editor, NGS Monthly
  • NGS 2019 Family History Conference: Journey of Discovery Call for Proposals by Ann Carter Fleming, CG, CGL, FNGS
  • The Gone, the Missing, and the Misindexed: Finding Lost Families by J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA
  • Hidden Treasures on FamilySearch by Robert Raymond
  • Mining Underground Gems on Ancestry by Juliana Szucs
  • Docket: the Court’s Index by Liz Stratton, PLCGS
  • Auxiliary Records of World War I Veterans by Theresa Fitzgerald, MA
  • The Records of Jews, Huguenots, and Palatines in Ireland by Fiona Fitzsimons

Departments
  • President’s Message by Ben Spratling
  • Editor’s Note by Deb Cyprych
  • 2017 NGS Volunteers
  • Technology Search Methodologies for Genealogists by Jordan Jones
  • National Archives The National Archives Catalog by Claire Prechtel Kluskens
  • Reference Desk Using the Periodical Source Index to Improve Research by Kathy Petlewski, MSLS
  • DNA Demystified Mitochondrial DNA: A Maternal Gift by Diahan Southard 

NGS Magazine is published quarterly to update members of the National Genealogical Society on NGS activities and to provide genealogists with special information and guidance on conducting effective genealogical research. The magazine is sent to libraries by subscription. Online access to NGS Magazine is available only as long as membership is active.

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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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02 January 2018

National Genealogical Society Issues Call for Proposals for its 2019 Family History Conference



ARLINGTON, VA, 2 JANUARY 2018—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) has opened the call for proposals for its 2019 Family History Conference, effective 2 January through 1 April 2018. The conference will be held in St. Charles, Missouri, from 8–11 May 2019.

The conference program, Journey of Discovery, will focus on our ancestors’ records and the knowledge, skills, and tools family historians and genealogists need when they embark on a new journey of discovery with each family they research.  

Our American pioneers experienced their own journey of discovery as they migrated to the Louisiana Purchase and the Northwest Territory, thus opening the Midwest and Plains states to migration and new settlements. Over time, the rivers, trails west, and railroads were vital to this expansion. Bounty land warrants, the Homestead Act, and land grants provided many opportunities for settling the Midwest and points west. Native Americans, French fur traders, and Spanish soldiers preceded these settlers, discovering the beauty of the geysers, mountains, and plains much earlier. 

Migration from the east and south included Americans formerly from England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, often traveling with those enslaved or indentured. The end of the Civil War provided opportunities for African Americans to leave the plantations and travel north. The Germans and Irish as well as Eastern Europeans, all seeking new opportunities, poured into the country. They established new towns and cities, schools, and businesses, while maintaining their own customs and religions.

NGS encourages proposals from individuals and organizations. Conference tracks under consideration will reflect the journey of discovery of America’s diverse ancestors and will include immigration, government documents, emigration, court records, ethnic resources, maps, migration, military records, religion, DNA, research methodology, technology, heirloom preservation, and some regional topics.

Speakers may submit up to eight proposals electronically via http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/call_for_proposals.

Genealogical and historical organizations are encouraged to sponsor a lecture and may submit proposals via http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/call_for_proposals. For more information, visit http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/call_for_proposals.

All proposals must be submitted electronically by 11:59 p.m. EDT on 1 April 2018.




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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