01 March 2015

Long Lost Family -- One-Hour TV Special TONIGHT on TLC


The press release says ...

TLC REUNITES LOVED ONES ON NEW SPECIAL LONG LOST FAMILY

Hoping to find their biological families, two adoptees team up with hosts Chris Jacobs and Lisa Joyner to embark on an emotional journey in the new one-hour special LONG LOST FAMILY.  For hosts Chris and Lisa, the painstaking search for answers is familiar territory. Both of them were adopted as young children, later searching for – and ultimately reuniting with – their biological families. Premiering Sunday, March 1 at 10/9c on TLC, viewers will watch adoptees go through the ups and downs of trying to track down loved ones they’re so anxious to meet....

Read the full press release for more details.











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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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26 February 2015

20 Free and (Relatively) New Genealogy and Family History Resources, Part 3


My present continues ... 20 more FREE resources ....
  1. Google launches Maps Gallery, a new digital atlas that lets you explore third-party maps
  2. PRONI Guide to Northern Irish School Records Holdings
  3. Reading old documents (UK Archives) -- online tutorials on Latin and palaeography will help you to read documents from the medieval period and beyond
  4. If You Can’t Make It To the Lecture
  5. North Carolina Gazetteer is Online Through NCpedia
  6. How I Discovered New York City’s Old Typography District
  7. Montgomery County [IN] Genealogy Club Digitizes Bible Records
  8. Early Records of the Town of Providence [RI]
  9. Personal Digital Archiving: The Basics of Scanning
  10. Digitised Tasmanian Archive and Heritage resources online (Australia)
  11. Tiki-Toki: Online Timeline Creation Tool
  12. Similar Site Check -- a free search engine that that finds similar and related Web sites
  13. Catholic Cemeteries with Online Burial Databases in the US
  14. Town of Morrisville (NC) Public Records Access
  15. British Pathé to open up entire film archive of 85K videos to YouTube -- 85,000 videos, contains footage of historic content from both World Wars, interviews with survivors of the Titanic, etc
  16. History of the Great Lakes States
  17. Archivio di Stato di Torino (Italy) – Digitization projects
  18. New Finding Aids Online (Library and Archives of Canada)
  19. Yivo Digital Archive on Jewish Life in Poland
  20. Online Digital Map Collections by State

                





Editor’s Note: As of today, each of the above links worked.  Now, whether the links in any of the identified articles work, I cannot vouch for that.  And, armed with the information provided, it should be relatively easy to get to determine where the discussed database currently resides.  If you get really stuck, drop me an email and I’ll try to ferret out the recalcitrant link or cross out my entry in the above list!
















~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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25 February 2015

Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) Continues to Expand



The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) continues to expand! 

DPLA welcomes four new Service Hubs: Tennessee, Maryland, Maine, and the Caribbean. The notification goes into some detail about what entities are involved with these new hubs; often several different archives as part of a partnership/consortium.

There is a map at the bottom of this announcement showing Service Hubs, Service Hub partner states, Hubs in active development and 2015 applicants.

The collection currently includes over 8 million items from libraries, archives, and museums.

Want to learn more about this great resource, check out the Tutorials & Introductory Videos page.  This gives you perspective on the project as well as some helpful information about how to best access the available collected and growing history of America.

As always, do not assume that you will only find information in repositories located in the same geographic location of your locale of interest.  I searched on “Wake County” and came up with a list of materials from local institutions and also from institutions in Boston (MA), NYC, MD, VA, UT, SC and other locations!  In the past, it would have been very hard to identify, never mind visit, these out-of-state repositories for information about Wake County (NC).

"Wake County" NC records are found in many repositories outside of NC -- I bet the same holds true for whatever locale you are researching!

Sometimes it almost feels like so many neat collections of records and so little time!

There will be another call for DPLA Hubs this June (2015). If your state is currently not represented, this could be an opportunity for them to join this vibrant growing online digital library.

  



Editor’s note: Previous Upfront with NGS posts about DPLA ...






~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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24 February 2015

Copyright + You -- YES, you as in genealogists and family historians!


Copyright is important.  It is important to any family history works we author and want to copyright as well as those writings, photographs or copyrightable materials created by others that we may want to use.

The U.S. Copyright Office has issued the third edition of the Compendium of U.S. Copyright Office Practices.  You can read it online or you can download all 1200+ pages in PDF.

As usual, the Legal Genealogist (Judy G. Russell) has written an excellent overview of The Compendium, talking about what has changed since the last edition was published in 1984 and some of what is included in this publication.

This is not a publication to be read cover-to-cover and it is an important reference work to have in your genealogist toolbox!





Editor’s note: Previous Upfront with NGS posts about Copyright ...




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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23 February 2015

National Genealogical Society Launches NGS Monthly -- A New Digital Publication



ARLINGTON, VA. 23 FEBRUARY 2015.  The National Genealogical Society (NGS) today launched NGS Monthly, a new digital publication that, each month, will feature a selection of original articles on genealogical methodology, research techniques, sources, and the latest news from NGS. Published mid-month starting after the February launch, NGS Monthly was created to replace the Society’s older newsletter, What’s Happening, with a new content and design strategy. 

NGS Monthly has a cool, clean look with predominantly green and white graphics and a lean design strategy to avoid distractions. “What’s Happening was using an older delivery system that limited the Society in terms of layout, graphics, readability and enjoyment. We wanted to provide our members with a more pleasant experience that will include visuals and varying lengths of articles, plus social media access,” said Jordan Jones, President of the National Genealogical Society.

The new content strategy has at its core the decision to give readers two thoughtful, longer-length original articles each month. One article in NGS Monthly will be devoted to genealogical methods and tie back to a past article in the digital archive of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (NGSQ) to give the reader examples from case studies. The concept is to “deconstruct” scholarly work so that genealogists of all levels can benefit from analysis of the fine work in this premier journal.

“There are many media options on the genealogical landscape today. NGS wanted to provide something special, something that could bring new understanding to the components of really excellent work that many of us aspire to and look at how expert writers handle sources, information and evidence to build proof of relationships,” explained Terry Koch-Bostic, Chair of the NGS Communications and Marketing Committee.

NGS Monthly editor, Melissa Johnson, added, “The inaugural articles will set the stage for future content. The lead article in the launch issue, ‘What Is an NGSQ Case Study?’ will help NGS members understand the purpose, significance, and structure of the case studies that appear in NGSQ, and the second article, ‘Eight Tips For Deconstructing an NGSQ Case Study,’ provides a look at some individual elements of a case study.”
  
Articles that are reflective about methodology and others providing readers with new insights, combined with NGS updates and news stories, form the core content strategy for NGS Monthly. The new format also encourages members to share news items through social media and gives them easy access to the NGS homepage, Twitter feed and Facebook page. There are also useful links to the digital archives for NGS Magazine, NGSQ and Upfront with NGS.

A subscription to the digital publication, NGS Monthly, is provided as part of a paid membership in the National Genealogical Society along with subscriptions to the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, NGS Magazine and Upfront with NGS blog. Upfront is also available free to subscribers. For more information on NGS Monthly and these other fine publications, visit www.ngsgenealogy.org.  

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.









~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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20 February 2015

20 Free and (Relatively) New Genealogy and Family History Resources, Part 2


My present continues ... 20 more FREE resources ....

  1. Marriages, Baptisms, Deaths (St. Columbian, Quebec, Canada)
  2. Recorded Cases of Black Female Lynching Victims 1886-1957
  3. Native American Nations (Map)
  4. Polish Sites -- PGSA's first step to inform and build awareness in the ability of our members to access "Digitized Polish Vital Records" via the internet
  5. Two Czechoslovakian websites -- State Regional Archives LitomericeState Regional Archives Trebon and State District Archives of South Bohemia
  6. Mapping Slavery in Detroit
  7. 10 great online newspaper archives – world-wide list from British Library
  8. Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States
  9. Map and Dataset Gallery (Place My Past)
  10. The Empire That Was Russia
  11. Historic maps in the public domain (British Library)
  12. Lowcountry [SC] Digital History Initiative
  13. Historical Chart of the Causes, Milestones, and Battles of the Revolutionary War
  14. Art & Architecture Thesaurus Now Available as Linked Open Data (Getty Research Institute)
  15. Almost in America: Portraits from Ellis Island
  16. Old Pictures of the US
  17. Locating London’s [UK] Past
  18. Elks, Shriners, and Masons: How 'old man' frats got their names and symbols
  19. Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections
  20. How to Trace Your Ancestors in County Monaghan (Ireland)
                


Editor’s Note: Missed the 1st part of this series?  No worries, click on 20 Free and (Relatively) New Genealogy and Family History Resources, Part 1 to see what neat gems were posted last week!


Editor’s Note: As of today, each of the above links worked.  Now, whether the links in any of the identified articles work, I cannot vouch for that.  And, armed with the information provided, it should be relatively easy to get to determine where the discussed database currently resides.  If you get really stuck, drop me an email and I’ll try to ferret out the recalcitrant link or cross out my entry in the above list!
















~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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19 February 2015

National Genealogical Society Appoints New Executive Director


ARLINGTON, VA 19 February 2015. The Board of Directors of the National Genealogical Society (NGS) announced the appointment of Edward Grandi as the Society’s Executive Director. Grandi joins NGS to help further their mission to promote genealogical excellence by helping enthusiasts improve their skills. His work will focus on the NGS growing portfolio of specialized family history learning resources, many of which can be accessed from anywhere in the world. NGS offers a full spectrum of educational opportunities, including its conference, in-depth publications, digital media and cloud-based, online courses from leading experts. Researchers can select from tailored educational programs to learn how to work smarter at every level and search for the right records, which helps them discover more about their ancestors.

The interest in traditional and genetic genealogy continues to grow in popularity across the country and all over Europe.  The PBS Genealogy Roadshow and Finding Your Roots, plus Who Do You Think You Are on TLC, raise the hopes of many who dream of finding their ancestors, especially to connect to family across the oceans. Grandi begins his tenure with NGS at this exciting time in the marketplace and just as NGS is about to implement strategic initiatives, that will guide the work and the development of new educational products and courses, over the next three years. He recently commented, “I care deeply about family history and I am excited to begin this new role. Not only do I want to foster new ways to advocate education and quality standards in family history, I want to make sure that access is maintained and records are preserved for future generations.”

Working with nonprofits allowed Grandi to hone skills critical to the NGS Executive Director role including communications, fundraising, advocacy, marketing, and in today’s world, social media planning. He had long experience in senior corporate roles specializing in insurance and risk management for nonprofits and most recently served as an Executive Director to a patient-interest association in Washington, D.C.

Jordan Jones, President of NGS said, “Edward Grandi brings a wealth of business and nonprofit expertise to our Society. As part of our recent strategic planning, we are refocusing some of our energies on staff development. Edward is part of that investment and he will help us take NGS in exciting new directions.  We view his appointment as a sign of our commitment to leadership in the genealogical field.”

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.









~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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