12 February 2016

U.S. National Archives Archival Recovery Team -- Trying to retain our heritage


So many valuable artifacts, documents, and more get “legs” and walk out of repositories and elsewhere – with some human help of course.

I will admit to being oblivious to the scale of the issue until I started following the US Archives National Archival Recovery Team on Facebook.  This page shares both newly identified losses of artifacts along with successful recovery stories. So far I have seen more of the former. Its scope is worldwide.

Lost and stolen documents are an issue at any repository.  NARA has a web page dedicated to “Recover Lost and Stolen Documents” including a fairly long list of currently identified “Missing Historical Documents and Items” along with select images. You are provided information on how you can ensure that United States government documents are returned to NARA. The Washington Post did an article, National Archives hunts for missing treasures with recovery team, back in 2011 and even 60 Minutes on its web site has a piece, Historical Treasures Missing from National Archives dated 2012.

And, it’s not just NARA, other national archives and big repositories that have this issue.  Lost or stolen items are a problem for any facility that holds unique, one-of-a-kind type material.

When I saw the most recent posts by the US Archives National Archival Recovery Team on my FB page, I was reminded of being reminded on Monday (as part of a behind the scenes tour at the State Archives of North Carolina), that a few key NC documents had both been “lost” and then “recovered” through time. Probably the most famous one was the NC copy of the Bill of Rights (recovered in 2003) and you can read about that on the U.S. Marshals Service web page.

You just have to Google on recovering + stolen + artifacts to see how big the problem is.

We are all stewards of historical documents.  Even though this guidance provided by NARA focuses on professionals, we can still heed the same advice.

If you are a document collector, dealer, or a staff member at another archives, library, or museum, you can:
·        avoid buying, selling, or trading in lost or stolen historical U.S. government documents.

Let’s do all that we can to help preserve our heritage.  

Does your state, local archive, history or related museum have an active “recovery” program?  

Like NC, has your state or another repository somewhat recently recovered an official document?  Or, has something recently gone missing?

Creating awareness about “lost or stolen” items helps aid in their recovery and hopefully in preventing future thefts.











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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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11 February 2016

Taverns, Public Houses, and Pubs once central to neighborhoods are mostly pieces of history now ...


Taverns or related always have a fond place in my heart and it’s not because I’ve spent a lot of time in them.  It’s because it’s the one bit of history I learned about my husband’s family that he found interesting.  I discovered a Welsh ancestor had owned a pub.

“The Old Parish Public Houses Past and Present II” John Lyons, 1987.

Horse and Groom, 128 Commercial Street, Maesteg
The Original licensed house of this name dates back at least to 1841.
Cardiff & Merthyr Guardian, 9th August 1845

A convivial meeting called a Pie (Pye) was held at the Horse and Groom, Maesteg. Many young persons congregated in a room over the brew house. In the brew house there was a large boiler of scalding water when suddenly the floor gave way but the boards on the floor wedged themselves into a shape of a “V”. No one was scalded, only slight injuries occurred. An Irishman who was a spectator to the whole event stated “That they had escaped death by the will of God.”

In 1846 Charles Lewton Brains married Jane Hutchinson, whose father James Hutchinson was a publican, and later kept the old Farmers Arms, Maesteg.

Charles Lewton (dropping the name Braine) went on to keep the Horse and Groom. He died in 1868. [per my own research, his wife continued to run the establishment]

I recently came across an article about a related collection held in Connecticut,  Exploring America’s Largest Collection of Early Tavern Signs.  

The signage, though, was a rather difficult design challenge. While today restaurants and bars are often easily identifiable by the form and shape of their buildings, historic watering holes were virtually indistinguishable from the private residences on either side of them: They were literally public houses. The painted and carved saloon signs hanging outside would signpost to visitors that food, drinks and lodging were to be had inside. 

This reminded me that there is a lineage society, The Flagon and Trencher: Descendants of colonial Tavern Keepers.

There is also a database dedicated to documenting “The Lost Pubs” of England.

Is there something comparable for the US?

The only “taverns” I have been in are Gadby’s Tavern in Alexandria VA and I think all the taverns in Colonial Williamsburg.

Have you dined in taverns that recreate an 18th century experience?

Were your ancestors publicans, tavern keepers or related?

What are the best resources for researching those who owned taverns, public houses, and related?



Editor's Note: The Horse and Groom is now a pizza place.






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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10 February 2016

National Genealogical Society Opens Registration for Research Trip to Fort Wayne, IN 15 to 19 August 2016



ARLINGTON, VA, 10 FEB 2016—Registration is now open for the National Genealogical Society’s guided research trip to the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana, from 15–19 August 2016. Under the guidance of research consultants Pamela S. Eagleson, CG SM and Patricia Walls Stamm, CG SM, CGLSM, participants have five days to conduct personal research at one of the largest genealogical libraries in the Midwest. For more information or to register for the trip, visit http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/ft_wayne_research_trip.

One of the noteworthy research repositories, the Allen County Public Library houses the Fred J. Reynolds Historical Genealogy Collection; PERSI, the Periodical Source Index, and in a joint venture with the Indiana State Museum, the Abraham Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection. The library’s collection contains more than 350,000 printed volumes and 513,000 microforms. . 

The trip includes:
o      Guidance from leading experts
o      Online orientation 
o      Meet and greet for participants
o      Four genealogical presentations
o      Personal research consultations with group leaders
o      Tour of the Abraham Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
o      Five nights at the Courtyard by Marriott, including free internet in rooms and parking for one car or airport transfers
o      Fees and taxes for all planned events

For more information or to register for the trip visit http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/ft_wayne_research_trip. Payment is required in full at the time of registration. The package price does not include transportation to Fort Wayne.

Eagleson is a researcher, writer, and teacher who conducts client and personal research nationwide with an emphasis on New England, the mid-Atlantic, and the Midwest. A member of NGS since 1981, she currently serves as a director at large. She lectures at NGS national conferences as well as regional and local conferences. She has attended the National Institute on Genealogical Research (NIGR), the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR), the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG), and the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP). Winner of the 2004 NGS Family History Writing Contest, she is co-administrator of the Stone Surname DNA project and a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists and many regional genealogical societies.

Stamm serves as NGS Education Manager. She lectures on a wide variety of topics at many of NGS and the Federation of Genealogical Societies national conferences. She is a graduate of the NIGR and IGHR. Stamm is a course coordinator at Samford University's Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research and teaches at St. Louis Community College.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, the highest standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.









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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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09 February 2016

Forbes + Rootstech = Great Press for Genealogy!


When Forbes writes about your industry, something is definitely going right!

From earlier posts you know that Rootstech took place last week.  I’ve also been posting updates on the NGS FB page.

In its second year, there was the Innovator Showdown, and this is the topic covered by Forbes, 6 Top Companies Battled It Out To Claim The Grand Prize At The RootsTech's Innovator Showdown.

Obviously the article talked about the actual Innovator Showdown event and the outcome and it was the introductory paragraph that really caught my eye as I thought it really characterized not just this event and our family research community ...

As I walked through the exhibit hall of the convention center I saw everything from young teenagers to 90+ year olds cruising along in their motorized scooters. I was thoroughly impressed at the diversity this conference attracted. Beyond just a wide span of age, there was everything from people just beginning to have an interest in family history that wanted to learn the basics on how to get started, to the most advanced professional genealogists looking to network with others in their field. In addition, there were software engineers, entrepreneurs, investors, and innovators, all sharing an interest in developing and creating systems and technologies that either cater to the field of family history and genealogy, or that utilize the data captured in that process to develop unique new applications.

Do read the article to learn about the Innovator Showdown event, the format, the finalists and the ultimate winner.




Editor’s Note: Previous posts on this year’s edition of Rootstech.









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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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08 February 2016

Records Preservation and Access Committee (RPAC) has a Blog!



The Records Preservation and Access Committee (RPAC) has a brand new blog! The Records Advocate will communicate about records access issues.

Here is the introductory post ...

Stay Informed! Sign-up for the Records Advocate Blog!
Help RPAC be proactive on records access issues, sign-up for the Records Advocate by clicking-on the “subscribe to blog” blue box on your right. [Editor’s note – when you visit the website, the subscribe option is always shown on the right]  The Records Advocate will keep you advised of state, federal, and international access issues throughout the year which may impact your family history research.

Proactive Genealogists Have Made a Difference! If Your State Legislature is in Session, Stay Alert!
Over the last few years, genealogists have achieved more favorable outcomes when they heard about pending legislation and had time to respond. Many state legislatures are in session during the first few months of the year. Stay alert to possible restrictive legislation in your state.

Make Sure the 2011 Model State Vital Statistics Act is Not Passed in Your State!
The 2011 Model State Vital Statistics Act if passed in your state will increase the embargo period for access to Vital Records, as well as indexes, to 125 years for birth records, 75 years for death records, and 100 years for marriage and divorce records. RPAC is particularly concerned in states which passed the last vital statistics model act in 1992. If you learn of any legislation which will affect access to public records, contact RPAC ataccess@fgs.org. You can read the proposed 2011 Model Act at http://www.fgs.org/rpac/publications/.

Sign-up for the Records Advocate to Stay Informed!

The blog editor has shared that “The post about the Model Vital Statistics Act reminds everyone that most state legislatures are in session and to stay in tune to any legislation in their state. While we are watching the national election for president at the end of the year, your state legislature might pass laws restricting records access in the meantime.”

NGS is proud to be hosting this blog and a sponsor of RPAC.

I have signed up for the Records Advocate, have you?











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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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05 February 2016

Findmypast Launches US Marriages Collection -- FREE until 15 February 2016


In 2016/17, Findmypast will be releasing the largest online collection of US marriage records, spanning centuries of American history and over 100 million "I do's". As part of this project, Findmypast has launched the first 33 million records of this collection and is offering them to the public for FREE from now until 15 February.

The eventually complete collection is described as ...

US marriages collection spans 350 years of American history - 1650-2010 - and comprises over 100 million records, 450+ million names from 2,800 of the 3,000 counties in the United States. Within the records you can discover the Bride & Groom’s ages, occupations, place of residence and even find out about the parents and witnesses at the wedding to help expand your family tree further.










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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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Colorado Adoptees Can Now Access Birth Records



The most recent state to allow its adoptees access to adoption records is Colorado.  

As of Jan. 1, 2016, all birth certificates regardless of when the adoption took place are available. 

Forms, including “Application to Access an Original Birth Certificate” can be found here.

You can see a summary of the applicable law (SB 51) here.  The law was passed in 2014 and created a transition period until 1 January 2016.

The American Adoption Congress maintains a page which identifies which states provide access and then currently relevant legislation for every state.

Upfront with NGS has discussed how other states have recently opened birth records for adoptees, For the first time, Rhode Island opens adoption records (2012) and Ohio opens adoption records for Jan 1964 - Sep 1996 this Friday (20 March 2015).

Is your state on the verge of allowing adoptees access to their original birth records?

Are you an adoptee who has recently gotten access to your birth certificate?  What did that mean to you?












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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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