17 April 2014

Tiki-Toki a fun free timeline creation tool that can create a visual masterpiece of your families history!


Diane's Tiki-Toki Test Timeline with an image backdrop and event dialogue box
We often use timelines/matrices in our research.  They are a great way to envision the passage of time and who is doing what, where, when and with whom!

A Michigan State University blog post titled Tiki-Toki: Online Timeline Creation Tool introduced me to the free web-based timeline tool, Tiki-Toki. It is quite powerful; more so than my little example will illustrate.

To see how it worked I created a test timeline of a few data points.  My timeline is so primitive that I didn’t include any digital images (e.g. of documents) nor did I engage the 3D presentation elements and there is only so much one can do in about 20 minutes!  I did like that I could add multiple events on a single date and they would stack up.  I often will have a data point from my research and then observations I might make relative to that data point.  I don’t want them integrated since the observations are often of a “generic” nature and have relevance beyond the one data point.  In my next iteration, I will use what is called the category bands view and then I put my data points in one band and my notes in another.

Diane's Tiki-Toki Test Timeline without an image and just a colored background and event dialogue box
I thought maybe the first version with the image background was too clutter though I do find it easier to look at than this version -- maybe a change in color scheme is needed!??!!?

I found it pretty intuitive to use and it does help to view the timeline created giving a history of the tool, http://www.tiki-toki.com/timeline/entry/43/Beautiful-web-based-timeline-software/#vars!date=2010-10-11_14:33:00!  which does highlight its various features.

Do know that to save as an image or PDF there are other “free” applications that you will have to download to perform these actions.

From my example, it’s clear that I will need to play around with this a bit more and if I were to add an appropriate backdrop, include snippets of the original documents acquired along with fully developed source citations and more, this could be a very neat (and visually interesting) way to share a timeline.

And, if I used the 3D elements, I could, for example, have a path of data for each of a bunch of like-named individuals.  This way I could see them in the context of time (and space) in context with one another.  

If you decide to play with Tiki Toki, please share a link to your efforts!

Do you have a favorite (and easy-to-use) timeline creation tool?



Editor’s Note: Other Upfront with NGS articles related to using timelines as a genealogical research tool.




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16 April 2014

Registration for the NGS Conference and All Ticketed Events Closes 22 April 2014


Arlington, VA, 16 April 2014: Have you registered for the NGS Family History Conference in Richmond? The deadline for pre-conference registration is 22 April 2014. Registration will be available on-site beginning at 12:00 noon, 6 May 2014, in the Greater Richmond Convention Center.

Registration for all meals, social events, and workshops closes on 22 April 2014. No ticket purchases will be available on-site at the conference for meals, social events, or workshops. Likewise, registration for Librarians’ Day also closes on 22 April 2014. For conference information and to register, go to http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/attend/.

Breakfast, Luncheons, and the NGS Banquet
Participating organizations sponsor several luncheons during the conference. Seats are still available for several of the luncheons, the NGS First-Timers Breakfast, and the NGS Banquet. Make your reservations now at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/attend/. The NGS First-Timers Breakfast is $24, luncheons are $32, and the banquet is $51. Menus are in the registration brochure at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Registration-Brochure-Final-Rev-11.pdf.

Live Streaming
If you are unable to attend the NGS 2014 Family History Conference, ten lectures featuring some of the most popular topics and nationally known speakers will be available to you via live streaming.  Details about viewing the live streaming program and the costs can be found at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/attend/live-streaming-at-ngs2014gen/. Registration for the live streaming program closes on 30 April 2014.

Society Night
On Wednesday evening 7 May 2014, many Virginia genealogical and historical societies will be available in the Richmond Marriott from 5:15 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. to answer questions about local repositories and resources, discuss their group’s activities, and sell their publications.

Richmond Area Tours
There are a few seats left on the historical tours prior to the NGS 2014 Family History Conference through Richmond Discoveries’ Tours on Tuesday, 6 May 2014. To register go to http://www.richmonddiscoveries.com/ngs.php.  The password is NGS2014 and is case sensitive.

Add Items to an Existing Registration
To add meals to your current registration, log on at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org, click on My Account, select My Events, and then click to Add Sessions. To add pre-conference events, click on My Account and then select Upcoming Events.

You really don’t want to miss this year’s exciting conference program from 7–10 May at the Greater Richmond Convention Center and Richmond Marriott.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.  Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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15 April 2014

The Society of the Cincinnati Library -- a hidden gem near Dupont Circle in DC

Copyright 2014, Diane L Richard

I spent a delightful Friday the other week visiting Anderson House, the home of The Society of the Cincinnati and its library.  I was there to research the pre-1810 records of one of the constituent societies.  The archivist, Valerie Sallis, was incredibly helpful and made sure that I exhausted every conceivable record and book for my research. 

What I didn’t learn until I was there is that the library is open to the public.  Though its value is clearly weighted toward those researching the Revolutionary War time period, many holdings also contain the names of those who served.  Additionally, when I returned home and decided to write this post, I learned via the website of some neat digitized resources.  In the words of The Society of the Cincinnati ...

The Society of the Cincinnati library collects, preserves, and makes available for research printed and manuscript materials relating to the military and naval history of the eighteenth century, with a particular concentration on the people and events of the American Revolution. The Robert Charles Lawrence Fergusson Collection specializes in works relating to the art of war in the period, providing context for the achievement of the volunteer American forces and their French allies in securing the independence of the United States. Complementing the library's extensive rare book collection are historical manuscripts, maps, graphic arts, and the archives of the Society of the Cincinnati. In addition, a modern reference collection supports research on the American revolutionary period and the history of the Society of the Cincinnati and its members; and a collection of nineteenth- and twentieth-century children's literature and fiction reveal popular perceptions of the American Revolution through time. The library also houses books, manuscripts, photographs, and other documentary materials relating to Larz and Isabel Anderson.

The Society's library is not primarily a genealogical library and does not generally collect works on family history and lineage. However, through its collecting focus on the Revolutionary War there may occasionally be modern or rare resources documenting a particular individual's military career or Society membership. Applications for membership in the Society are strictly handled through the fourteen constituent societies that make up the General Society, and any membership records held onsite are closed to research without prior approval from the constituent society to whom those records belong.

The library is open to the public by appointment Monday through Friday from 10:00 am - 4:00 pm. The library is located on the lower floor of Anderson House, the Society's headquarters located in Washington, D.C. Readers are required to register and show photo identification in order to access the collections. The library makes photocopies and scans of materials on a case-by-case basis as conditions of the material allow. Readers are also allowed to take their own photographs for personal research use, provided they are not published online or in-print without our permission. The library catalog and finding aid for the Society archives are available for searching online through our website. As well, selected rare works from the collections--including several manuscript orderly books from the Continental Army-- have been digitized and are available for online reading or download. The library is happy to answer questions about the collections from off-site researchers and schedule appointments for on-site use by email at library@societyofthecincinnati.org, or over the phone at 202-785-2040 ext. 411.

When you contact the library via e-mail and/or when you show up for your scheduled appointment, the reading room regulations will be shared with you.

Even if you don't want or need to do research at the library, the museum is open and free to visit, 1-4 PM, Tuesday-Saturday.  Tours are also available, for individuals or groups. Additionally, many public programs are offered.  Most are free to attend and include concerts, informal talks, author talks, lectures, day trips and more.

If you cannot visit the house in person, do check out the virtual tour (then and now -- at the bottom of this page) of select areas of the house.

Though I didn’t find the “smoking gun” that I had hoped for, I did learn more about the person I was researching and in our world, when you are researching someone who served in the Revolutionary War, any information is valuable. I also got to see a glimpse of a gorgeous historical building.  

Have you found the library/archive of another lineage society especially invaluable?



Editor’s Notes:  A recent Upfront with NGS post about visiting archives and using manuscript collection, Are you using manuscript collections for your genealogy research? If not, the gems you might be missing!!


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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14 April 2014

Militia, State Guard, Regular Army and more -- what's the difference?



A recent post by genealogy decoded (aka Beth Foulk), Militia Units and Volunteer Units – What’s the Difference? reminds us that just because an ancestor was referred to as a captain, this doesn’t always mean that he served in the regular army with that rank.

It could be that he served in the militia or home guard, for example.  Or, as I recently learned in NC, someone I was researching served in the Civil War in the “Junior reserves” as a 17 year old.  I was previously aware of the Senior Reserves when I unexpectedly found a person (John W Grissom serving from Granville County NC) listed as serving in that capacity.

The Senior Reserves were men between the ages of 45 and 50, who were called into service in 1864, as the Confederacy was feeling the effects of the Union’s larger numbers. North Carolina raised five regiments, four battalions, and two independent companies of Senior Reserves, from all parts of the state except those under Union occupation. At various times, Senior Reserves guarded bridges and depots, rounded up deserters, and guarded prisoners at Salisbury and elsewhere. Some saw action in South Carolina with General Hardee as he attempted to hold off the Federal advance to North Carolina, some aided in the defense of Fort Fisher, and some fought at Bentonville, the last major battle of the war. 
(Source: Senior Reserves description provided in already-referenced article)

I was reminded of the many ways in which men served during the Civil War when I wrote a piece about Civil War newspaper research and came across this entry ...

Cabarrus  County – Col. J.C. Barnhardt, 34th N.C.M., writes to Dr. McEachern, Senator from Cabarrus and Stanley, that Cabarrus has furnished to the C.S. service: volunteers, 1205; conscripts, 301; junior reserves, 103; senior reserves, 94; light duty men on service, 31; detailed and engaged on Government work, 20; detailed and exempted for N.C. railroad, 8; deduct from light duty men and others discharged, &c., 20; total, 1751; Home Guard duty at least 80 men.
(source: Fayetteville Observer, (Fayetteville, NC) Monday, February 06, 1865; Issue 2488; col A )

This means that you don’t want to stop your research if you don’t find your person listed as having served as a Confederate or Union soldier, for example, as there are many other ways in which he could have “served” and could have a “rank” associated with his surname in later records.




Editor’s Note: The Civil War Service Records collection at Fold3 has the records for the Confederate Third Battalion Senior Reserves North Carolina which shows John W Grissom’s service telling us that when he enlisted he was 47 years, 8 months and 6 days old and 5 feet and 9 ½ inches tall.




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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11 April 2014

Upfront Mini Bytes – Brooklyn Eagle, Aboriginal (CA), Medical Library, African-American, DARE, Colorado Law, French Revolution, and an Irish Mission

Welcome to our newest edition of our bi-weekly feature Upfront Mini Bytes.  In Upfront Mini Bytes we provide eight tasty bits of genealogy news that will help give you a deeper byte into your family history research. Each item is short and sweet.  We encourage you to check out the links to articles, blog posts, resources, and anything genealogical!

We hope you found the past editions helpful.  Use your favorite search engine with “Upfront with NGS” “Mini Bytes” or use this Google search link.

Do you have questions, suggestions for future posts, or comments?  Please post a comment or send an e-mail to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I love the “old” Brooklyn Eagle archives and the newly expanded version is wonderful. The Brooklyn Pubic Library (NY) now offers the full run of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle newspaper, from 1841 to 1955, as a free online resource.

Did your ancestors live in Canada in the late 19th century and into the 20th century?  Were they possibly Aboriginal? If you answered yes, check out Residential School Records Resources, including the newest digitized collection, photographs of residential schools.

Our ancestors died of many illnesses that we don’t recognize.  Ignoring that, most of us aren’t that familiar with many modern illnesses.  Help is available via the Medical Heritage Library, “a digital curation collaborative among some of the world’s leading medical libraries, [that] promotes free and open access to quality historical resources in medicine.”  A neat element is that it gives you information in the context of published medical resources and it is international so you are not limited to English-language medical terms.

Fairview Cemetery is an important vestige of the African American community in Staunton and Augusta County, Virginia. Learn about its history and search the burial database.

With a daughter who is a linguist and as a genealogist who often struggles to figure out how a name was both pronounced and written, it’s impossible for me to ignore anything that might help me better understand the English language.  My newest play space into language is the Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE) where you can search on regional words, phrases, and pronunciations.  You can search across the country, in a particular region (group of states), or regions within a state (e.g. Outer Banks for NC).

Understanding the “law” always helps our interpretation of the documents we research into.  If you are researching Colorado ancestors, Colorado Session Laws (1861-1876) are now available online. Later Session Laws, currently 1993-present, are available online also.

There may not be too many of us researching ancestry in France during the French Revolution, but if you are, check out the French Revolution Digital Archive. Stanford University collaborated with the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) to produce a digital version of the key research sources of the French Revolution. The archive is based around two main resources, the Archives parlementaires and a vast corpus of images first brought together in 1989 known as the Images de la Revolution française. The website can be accessed in English or French.

There always seems to be some “new” Irish resource in the news.  The most recent one is The Irish Mission at Watson House.  Learn about “... the Mission of Our Lady of the Rosary for the Protection of Irish Immigrant Girls. This Mission operated from 1883 to 1954 in Watson House, which overlooks New York Harbour ... it was set up close to Castle Garden, the depot where immigrants were landed in the mid-to-late 19th century, before Ellis Island opened.“




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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10 April 2014

Now Available -- March 2014 Edition of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly


Volume 102, Number 1 of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly is now available online in the Members Only section of the website.

Feature Articles
·        Parents of Stephen Preston Bennett of Franklin County, Virginia, by Mary Foote W. Lund
·        A Family for Harry Harding of Philadelphia, by Kay Haviland Freilich, CG, CGL
·        Reconsidering the Immigration Story of President Woodrow Wilson’s Paternal Grandparents, by Erick Montgomery
·        Explaining the Sudden Disappearance of Mitch Evins of Texas and Georgia, by William M. Litchman, Ph.D.
·        Notes and Documents – Calculating and Using Dates and Date Ranges, by Barbara Levergood, Ph.D.


and other regular features ...



Editor’s Note: Please note that online access to the NGS Quarterly and NGS Magazine are available only as long as your membership is active. If you wish to discontinue this option and continue to receive print copies of the journal, please with our website and update your profile to indicate the same.




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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09 April 2014

Flipboard Magazines for Genealogy -- a blossoming new platform



Yesterday Instagram, today Flipboard!

As our world as a whole becomes more technological with more “new” toys to play with, these new applications make their way into our genealogy community.

Let’s talk about Flipboard.  It’s a way to create a magazine by using content already on the web (and probably via other methods not described here).

I opted to get started by installing a Chrome extension.  This extension allows me to just click on the icon for a page of interest (in this case, posts from Upfront with NGS) and “add” that content to my magazine. 


I just created this magazine based on Upfront with NGS posts.  Each included article has its graphic and beginning text visible.  The headline for each article is a clickable link to the original article. Each page gives you an option to “subscribe” to or “share” the magazine you are reading.


The presentation is very lush looking.  So, if you are a visual person – you might find this media appealing.  I think this magazine format also makes it easy to “catch up” on Upfront with NGS if you’ve missed a few posts since you can see more headlines in a horizontal fashion.  We’ve actually talked about that for the blog – that it would be nice to have a “more visual” method for quickly seeing the most recent news titles.  Might Flipboard be the answer?


What do you think?  For Upfront with NGS which format do you think is preferable? Real-time e-mail, 3pm EST digest mode, FB post, Google+ post or Flipboard?

Editor’s Note: please post your responses on FB, Google + or via a comment to this blog post for this informal survey

There are some in our genealogical community who have been playing around with this technology.  I suggest you check out these recent examples ...





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com


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