28 June 2017

Linkpendium – STILL one of my favorite genealogy websites!


Linkpendium – STILL one of my favorite genealogy websites!

Over the course of the summer, I plan to republish some older blog posts written about some of my favorite resources that I consider genealogical gems.  Whenever I give talks, I mention this website and I'm surprised by how many people still haven't heard about it.  Check it out now!

Originally published 3 July 2014 … (links checked and still seem to be working!)

Linkpendium -- one of my favorite genealogy websites

This is the second in a sporadic series where I talk about some of my favorite resources, sometimes put aside for awhile and then re-remembered in the course of a research project.

Linkpendium.  I go back to this resource time and time again, whether I am re-researching in a locale where I have previously done research or I am just starting some research for a community I am unfamiliar with.  And, even though I do extensive NC research just about every day, I will also check this site if my research involves a NC county for which I haven’t recently done any research.

This website does overlap with Cyndi’s List (with which many of you are probably familiar) and they each have their own unique focus and structure. Both are content aggregators.  This means that neither has created any of the content to which they link, though both help us out tremendously by putting at our finger tips, in one place, links to many disparate sources of information.

I typically go to Cyndi’s list for non-county-specific records information (e.g. research topics, country records, tools, etc) and I go to Linkpendium for county-specific records.

Linkpendium was developed (and still maintained with the assistance of others) by Karen Isaacson and Brian (Wolf) Leverich, founders of the extremely popular RootsWeb genealogical community site.  They are constantly updating (adding, deleting, correcting) the links on the website.  The easiest way to keep up with the website is via the Linkpendium Facebook (FB) page where it stated that as of 21 June 2014, the site indexes 10,413,608 different sources of genealogical data. Do recognize that not just status reports on Linkpendium appear on this FB page.

Additionally, the website is always soliciting links to new websites (or new to Linkpendium websites).  There is a form you can fill out (URL, description, your email address) to let them know about a website.  You can access this form at the top of each page where you see “Please, add your favorite Website(s) to this page!”

Though you can access the entire website from the link given previously, I typically just put something like Wake + County + Linkpendium into my search engine, click what is usually the top entry, and then I immediately am where I want to be.


Each county-level (and also state-level) page has the same structure.  Only if there is NO content appropriate for a particular heading does that heading not appear.  For each item listed, the source is identified, hyperlinks are provided directly to the resource, and then information on whether a fee website, indicated by ($), or a FREE website (nothing shown) is provided. 

It is an incredibly quick and easy way to find out how much material you might find online for a locale of interest.  The more that is listed, the more you might do in your jammies.  A smaller list means much of your research will need to take place offline (maybe time for that road trip, as we talked about yesterday!). As with any compilation, don’t assume it’s comprehensive and error-free (that is impossible), and it’s a great place to get started.

I start every new project by going to this website and seeing what it lists as available.  After you check it out, maybe you will too!




Editor’s Note : You can tell the affinity I have for this website as I have written two indepth pieces and included it in talks ::
Linkpendium: A Genealogy Gem! (2012, Archives.com)
Linkpendium (2008, Discovering Family History)











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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
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Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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26 June 2017

Family History Microfilm Discontinuation Effective 1 September 2017 (FamilySearch)


Family History Microfilm Discontinuation
Effective 1 September 2017 (FamilySearch)

From our friends at FamilySearch we received this news.  This will impact you if you are (1) a person who regularly looks at microfilm at Family History Centers, and (2) researching records which are not yet digitized by FamilySearch (though should be by 2020).

On September 1, 2017, FamilySearch will discontinue its microfilm distribution services.  (The last day to order microfilm will be on August 31, 2017.)

The change is the result of significant progress made in FamilySearch’s microfilm digitization efforts and the obsolescence of microfilm technology.

• Online access to digital images of records allows FamilySearch to reach many more people, faster and more efficiently.

• FamilySearch is a global leader in historic records preservation and access, with billions of the world’s genealogical records in its collections.

• Over 1.5 million microfilms (ca. 1.5 billion images) have been digitized by FamilySearch, including the most requested collections based on microfilm loan records worldwide.

The remaining microfilms should be digitized by the end of 2020, and all new records from its ongoing global efforts are already using digital camera equipment.

• Family history centers will continue to provide access to relevant technology, premium subscription services, and digital records, including restricted content not available at home.

Digital images of historical records can be accessed today in 3 places on FamilySearch.org under Search.

• Records include historical records indexed by name or organized with an image browse.

• Books include digital copies of books from the Family History Library and other libraries.

• Catalog includes a description of genealogical materials (including books, online materials, microfilm, microfiche, etc.) in the FamilySearch collection.

When approved by priesthood leaders, centers may continue to maintain microfilm collections already on loan from FamilySearch after microfilm ordering ends. Centers have the option to return microfilm that is available online or otherwise not needed. As more images are published online, centers may reevaluate whether to retain microfilm holdings.


We at NGS take this opportunity to remind you that there is a Research trip planned to Salt Lake City (and the full microfilm and book archive available there) scheduled for 28 January to 4 February 2018.  Registration is open and you can access full details here.









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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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23 June 2017

Daylight Savings Time -- Time Hasn't Always Been The Way We Think!:


Daylight Savings Time … an interesting history

Has your community every "tried" something and then tried to "turn the clock back?" Raleigh NC tried Daylight Savings Time (DST) back when most of the country (and also the rest of NC) weren't yet enamored with this rite of spring and fall. Read about this 1932 experiment. They weren’t the only community or state to play with this idea.

It really wasn't until 1966 and the Uniform Time Act that some order was brought to the situation.  Can you imagine having non-regulated non-uniform rules for DST?

It’s strange to realize that this all came about during my lifetime (though as a child – who cared about time?) and that many of our ancestors witnessed the introduction of something that we take for granted.

It wasn’t until 2007 that the dust seems to have settled on DST as we know it.  Read more here

In the contiguous US, only Arizona currently exercises that right [to opt out of DST]. Clocks in most of the state, including its capital, Phoenix, remain on Mountain Standard Time (MST) all year. The only exception is the Navajo Nation in northern Arizona, which follows DST to stay in sync with the parts of its territory extending into Utah and New Mexico—both states observe DST.

Other parts of the USA that do not follow DST are Hawaii and all of the country's external territories, such as Puerto Rico, Guam, and the US Virgin Islands.

In 2006, the state of Indiana, after having abstained from changing its clocks since 1970, decided to join the national DST regime.

I just never really thought about the concept of time.

Along those lines, did you know that we didn’t have a time zone system until the late 19th century when railroads drove that need.  Can you imagine that as railroads were introduced and expanded that there were more than 300 local times?!?!?!  Read more here.

I think of our world as mostly operating to common standards and just hadn’t thought that such wasn’t the case for our ancestors!



How did your ancestors react to DST?  Did they live in a community that played with its adoption pre-1966?

Are there other country-wide changes, that we take for granted, in “something” that also impacted our ancestors, and maybe ourselves, like DST or the introduction of time zones?









~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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22 June 2017

FREE Access -- British & Irish Records -- FindMyPast (22-26 June 2017)


FREE Access -- British & Irish Records -- FindMyPast (22-26 June 2017)
  
From our friends, at FindMyPast, we learn that from today through the 26th you have FREE access (with registration) to its British & Irish collection  (though the 1939 Register, newspapers and some record sets are not included).

As the website says …

Being British ourselves, it's not in our nature to brag, but when it comes to British and Irish records you've come to the right place.
·        Get back further with the most comprehensive set of British and Irish parish records anywhere (see map below).
·        Find your wartime ancestors with the critical 1939 Register*.
·        Go back further in military history with our records dating back to 1760.
·        Uncover the role your Irish ancestors played in history with our unrivalled Irish record collection.

Read the full announcement on the website.

Which British or Irish ancestors are you hoping to uncover?




























~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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21 June 2017

What Upfront with NGS is all about …


What Upfront with NGS is all about …

Good morning, afternoon, evening, or maybe even the middle of the night!  That’s the great thing about the internet and blogs, they are available 24/7 around the world!

Today I want to share with you an updated version of something written back in 2010 about this blog – about its purpose.  Though the purpose has remained largely the same, I’ve expanded on some of the details …

UpFront with NGS -- What we let you know about!

To help us help you, we want to let you know what kinds of information NGS posts via this Upfront with NGS blog. This way, if you haven’t been sending us material that meets the requirements for what we do post, we hope you will start doing so.  Additionally, if you have been asking us to post notices and have been wondering why they haven’t been showing up, now you know why not.

REMEMBER – Upfront with NGS is FREE and available for anyone to read!

1. Any National Genealogical Society (NGS) news – research trips, courses, videos, publications, conference news, etc.

2. News about “sales” on DNA test kits and FREE periods offered by subscription (aka limited access) resources (e.g. Ancestry.com, My Heritage)

3. Posts about pending legislation at the international, state or federal level that would impact access to and preservation of records used by genealogists and historical landmarks.  Reports on successes achieved in creating records access or successful preservation efforts.

4. Information on genealogical standards to ensure excellence, either their creation or when updated.

5. Announcements from the National Archives (NARA), the Library of Congress (LOC), state archives and libraries, and more.

6. NEW resources to assist in your family history research.  With many sources of news on the latest additions to existing resources such as Ancestry.com, FamilySearch, etc., we do NOT blog about these updates.

7. Recognition of various holidays, celebrations, and xxx Month (e.g., Black History Month, American Archives Month, Women’s History Month)

8. General news of interest to the genealogy community as identified by the blog editor. 

If you have a news item you would like to suggest, please drop a note to upfront@ngsgenealogy.org.

I hope this gives you a better sense of the types of material posted on Upfront with NGS.

A reminder that ALL Upfront with NGS blog posts automatically cross-post to the NGS Facebook page, Twitter feed, Google +, and with some help to Flipboard.  Additionally, you can subscribe via email (main blog page, left column) to receive a daily email on days when new material is posted. Hence, you have many different platforms where you can get this news.



What different types of “news” or “features” would you like to see included in Upfront with NGS in the future?

Which platform do you find best suits your needs?  Daily email? Directly visiting the blog? FB page? Twitter feed? Google+ ? Flipboard?




























~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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20 June 2017

History Unfolded -- US Newspapers and the Holocaust


History Unfolded -- US Newspapers and the Holocaust

From our friends at Newspapers.com … Learn about this newspaper-related project run by the Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Make a Difference with History Unfolded!
Looking for an easy way to make a big difference? Newspapers.com invites you to participate in the History Unfolded project run by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum!

What is History Unfolded? History Unfolded is a project that seeks to expand our knowledge of how American newspapers reported on Nazi persecution during the 1930s and '40s so we can better understand what Americans knew about the Holocaust as it was happening.

To help achieve this, the History Unfolded project asks people like you to search local newspapers from the 1930s and '40s for Holocaust-related news and opinions and then submit them online to the museum. The newspaper articles you submit will be used to help shape the museum’s 2018 exhibit on Americans and the Holocaust and related educational materials. The articles will also be made available to scholars, historians, and the public.

Who Can Contribute? Everyone! History buffs, students, teachers . . . All you need is an interest in the Holocaust and access to a newspaper from the 1930s or '40s, either online (using Newspapers.com, for example) or through a physical archive, such as a library. Simply create an account with History Unfolded, and away you go!

How Do I Contribute? History Unfolded has created a list of more than 30 Holocaust-related events to focus on. Choose one of these events to research, then search for content related to that topic in an American newspaper of your choice from the 1930s or '40s. After you find an article related to one of the events, submit it online to the museum through the project's website.

Newspapers.com and History Unfolded You can contribute to this important project whether or not you use Newspapers.com to do so. But using Newspapers.com makes it even easier to submit the articles you find. Simply use Newspapers.com to create a clipping of an article you've found, then submit that clipping through the submission form on the History Unfolded website. The submission form has a special tool created specifically for Newspapers.com users that makes submitting your clipping a snap.

Your help with this project will help shape our understanding of the Holocaust and the lessons it holds for us today. For more information on how to get involved, visit the History Unfolded website.


What projects are you aware of involving a concerted and narrowly defined effort to cull news published in newspapers to learn more about a particular aspect of history?



















~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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17 June 2017

Newest Edition of NGS Magazine Available to NGS Members, Digital Version Now IN FULL COLOR! (Apr/May/June 2017)



The Apr/May/June issue of the NGS Magazine (PDF 6.6 MB) is online in the Members Only section of the website.

Please enjoy the editor’s note from Deb Cyprych introducing you to the inclusion of color along with an overview of the contents.  A full table of contents list follows.

EDITOR’S NOTE

This issue commemorates the centennial of the United States’ entry into World War I on 6 April 1917.

In the first article, Tina Beaird offers tips for starting with local and state sources to identify a soldier’s unit and then expanding to federal records to obtain more information. Craig R. Scott presents a case study without even naming a soldier. His strategies for tracing the history of a military unit result in details that would not have been found by following a soldier only by name. David R. Hardin explores the mother lode of World War I records: the Official Military Personnel Files. Although a fire destroyed most of the Army files, some can be reconstructed, and the files of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard survived

Two of our columnists focus on World War I as well. Kathy Petlewski describes the disturbing experiences of “hyphenated Americans” on the homefront. Claire Prechtel Kluskens analyzes the records of more than six thousand enemy aliens interned during the war

Continuing the religious theme of the last issue, Michael Lacopo explains the value of religious periodicals in genealogical research and strategies for locating them. Elaine Kuhn presents the variety of nontraditional records associated with church members that may flesh out their lives. Fiona Fitzsimons introduces the content and locations of records of the dissenting churches of Ireland.

This issue features the final column (on autosomal DNA tools) by Debbie Parker Wayne, NGS Magazine’s expert DNA columnist for the past four years. Many readers have learned a great deal from her column, and we thank her for her contributions.

The image of Flora McDonald on the cover of the last issue prompted positive comments. However, the image isn’t relevant to Nancy A. Peters’s article about the Scots-Irish of the Carolinas. Flora and her husband were Highland Scots, not Scots-Irish. This error of association was ours, not Nancy’s.

As part of NGS Magazine’s changing design, the digital version of this issue is introducing full color. Log in as a member at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org, click Members Only on the top right, and click Browse the NGS Magazine Online under Publication Archives. After downloading the issue, click a title in the table of contents to go directly to the article. All websites and advertisements are hyperlinked as well. Issues from 2005 to date are searchable individually. While on the members page, check out the many other benefits for NGS members.


Table of Contents

Features

+ Paths to Your Past: 2-5 May 2018, Grand Rapids, Michigan, by Janet A. Alpert FNGS
+ Recreating A World War I Veteran’s Service History, by Tina Beaird, MLIS
+ Tracing the Movements of US Army Units in World War I, by Craig R. Scott, CG, FUGA
+ Official Military Personnel Files of World War I Veterans, by David R. Hardin
+ “She Bore Her Suffering With Christian Fortitude”: Using Religious Periodicals, by Dr. Michael D. Lacopo
+ The Knights of Columbus and the Ladies’ First Circle: Beyond Basic Church Records, by Elaine M. Kuhn
+ The Records of Irish Dissenting Churches: Part 1, by Fiona Fitzsimons

Departments

President’s Message, by Ben Spratling
Editor’s Note, by Deb Cyprych
NGS News
Reference Desk, by Kathy Petlewski, MLIS
National Archives, by Claire Prechtel-Kluskens
Genetic Genealogy Journey, by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL
NGS Members’ Book Notices




Editor’s Note: Please note that online access to the NGS Quarterly and NGS Magazine are available only as long as your membership is active. If you wish to discontinue this option and continue to receive print copies of the journal, please with our website and update your profile to indicate the same.





~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog. Any opinions expressed by guest authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the view of NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Suggestions for topics for future UpFront with NGS posts are always welcome. Please send any suggested topics to UpfrontNGS@mosaicrpm.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unless indicated otherwise or clearly an NGS Public Relations piece, Upfront with NGS posts are written by Diane L Richard, editor, Upfront with NGS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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Follow NGS via Facebook, YouTube, Google+, Twitter


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