23 March 2012

NC, SC state line isn't where folks thought it was

1862 Johnson Map of North Carolina and South Carolina (Wikimedia Commons)

If you think state and county borders is “old news” then check out this article about the NC/SC border which has just recently been “established,” hopefully for the last time!

“... For decades, officials thought the land where the store sits was in South Carolina, because maps said the boundary with North Carolina drawn back in the 1700s was just to the north.

But modern-day surveyors, using computers and GPS systems, redrew the border to narrow it down to the centimeter. Their results put the new line about 150 feet south of the old one ...” 

Living in NC this isn’t the only example of a recent case where a “border” was finally established.  Back in 2009 the border between Wake and Franklin Counties was set!


So, though we think in our research of checking “where land” is due to county formation and border changes as well as state formation and border changes, I’m not so sure that descendants will think to check for such for land when researching property in 2009 or 2012!

Do you know of other “modern” examples of border changes that will impact future genealogists?





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