19 October 2016

Open the door to your early New England ancestry for FREE (through 25 October)


Open the door to your early New England ancestry for FREE (through 25 October)

From our friends at American Ancestors …
October 18, 2016—Boston, Massachusetts—From October 18 to October 25, New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) is offering FREE access to essential resources for early New England family history research. With the creation of a free account at it's award-winning website, AmericanAncestors.org, family historians can access the most authoritative scholarship on early settlers in America. 

During a special free access week, family historians can search nearly 300,000 records across a unique sets of databases that are at the forefront of early American genealogical research: The Great Migration Study Project, the Early New England Families Study Project, and Torrey’s New England Marriages to 1700. In addition to these essential databases, family historians will also benefit from how-to guides and webinars from staff experts at NEHGS that provide helpful research tips and techniques, essential resources, and contextual information to advance genealogical research.

Between 1620 and 1640 about 20,000 men, women, and children crossed the Atlantic to settle New England. The Great Migration Study Project, under the scholarly direction of Robert Charles Anderson, provides concise, trusted genealogical and biographical sketches of these early immigrants to America. In the nine searchable databases of the Great Migration Study Project, researchers can pore over some 100,000 records that expertly narrate the lives of early immigrants to New England.
Following the work of the Great Migration, the Early New England Families Study Project provides fully searchable accounts of New England Families from 1641 to 1700 focusing on individuals who emigrated in 1641 or later, with sketches grouped by year of marriage. Lead Genealogist Alicia Crane Williams uses Clarence Almon Torrey’s bibliographic index of early New England marriages (and its recent successors) as a guide to compiling authoritative and fully documented sketches of individuals and families in New England in the period immediately following the Great Migration.

The foundation of the Early New England Families Study Project is Torrey’s New England Marriages to 1700. This famous work by Clarence Almon Torrey, owned by NEHGS, is an indispensable resource for any family historian with New England ancestors. The twelve-volume manuscript, presented as an every-name searchable database, enumerates more than 99% of all pre-1700 marriages for New Englanders, including those who married in Europe prior to migrating. In total, vital information on more than 37,000 couples is comprehensively cited in this key index.

Learn more at AmericanAncestors.org/early-new-england


Which database are you most looking forward to exploring?





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