10 December 2012

How to Use Evernote for Genealogical Research




Jordan Jones, current President of the National Genealogical Society, was interviewed by a writer at Evernote a few months back. They asked for a photo and some screen captures of how he uses Evernote for genealogy, and created a post about this.



... In this day and age, more documents are becoming digitized and the challenge is figuring out how to find and organize them. I use Evernote to capture documents, images, and PDFs I find online, and later add descriptive notes to these pieces of information. Serious genealogists try to keep a record of everything they find, even if it’s full of lies and conjecture. (For example, if you suspect that a document might be fraudulent or inaccurate, you can make a note of it. If you come across it again, you will know that you already saw and evaluated it.) Using Evernote, you can add your own notes, questions, and task boxes to the images of records you find in your research...

Read the full post!

Do you use Evernote for your genealogical research?  Do you have other tips for those already using Evernote for family history research?  Or, for those not yet using Evernote for their genealogical research, how would you “sell” using it?



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