29 June 2012

New Voices of Genealogy Release: John Frederick Dorman, CG (Emeritus),FASG, FNGS, FVGS




From guest blogger, Arlene V. Jennings

For the June observance of the 100th anniversary of the NGSQ, the NGS Voices of Genealogy series presents John Frederick Dorman’s story of “Becoming a Genealogist.” Founder and editor for fifty years of the journal, The Virginia Genealogist, Dorman is highly regarded as the “dean of Virginia genealogy.” This feature is sponsored by the Virginia Genealogical Society.

In this month’s interview, the sixth release in the Voices of Genealogy series, Dorman describes the inspiration he felt as a young child in knowing family members who were born in the 19th century and who knew other family members born in the decade after the revolution. His delight in the study of genealogy from the age of eight until today is evident in his telling of the story.

Dorman’s contributions to Virginia genealogy are perhaps incomparable. In 1957, when no other journal was devoted to genealogical studies for Virginia, he founded The Virginia Genealogist, which he published until 2006. In his journal he created an invaluable collection of extracts and transcriptions from original records and well researched and documented articles on Virginia ancestry. His publication was the first genealogical journal to follow the model of publishing references in the form of footnotes. Among his extensive publications, Dorman is also known and valued for the third and fourth editions of Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia 1607-1624/5. He continues to engage in a lifetime study of his Slaughter family.

John Frederick Dorman was named a fellow of the American Society of Genealogists in 1958, of the National Genealogical Society in 1962, and of the Virginia Genealogical Society in 1995. He is a founding associate and the earliest living associate of the Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG), having earned his credential as certified genealogist number four in 1965. He served as president of BCG from 1979 to 1982 and as BCG Executive Director from 1982 to 1986. In 2004 he was awarded Emeritus status for “sustained excellence and service” to BCG. In 2006 the New England Historic Genealogical Society presented him the Coddington Award of Merit recognizingthe highest standard of excellence in American genealogical scholarship and lifetime achievement in the field.”

The video was produced by award winning filmmakers Kate Geis and Allen Moore from an interview by Melinde Lutz Byrne, CG, FASG, co-editor of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly. John Frederick Dorman, CG (Emeritus), FASG, FNGS, FVGS, “Becoming a Genealogist,” is now playing for all NGS members at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.







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28 June 2012

I Found It In the Archives! 2012 National Competition Results




The Society of American Archivists recently announced the 2012 winner of the I Found It in The Archives! national competition.

Julie Dresser, a teacher’s aide from Sycamore, Illinois, is the winner. Her essay describes how a trip to the Benjamin F. Feinberg Library at State University of New York at Plattsburgh helped her discover priceless letters from her fourth-great grandmother.  Doesn’t that sound like a genealogical gold mine!

Here are the eight entries from the 2012 national competition:

Even though this competition is over, is there a real genealogical gem that you have found in an archive and would like to share with other genealogists? If so, post a comment about it!




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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27 June 2012

The 12 Essential Skills for Family Genealogists




Every genealogist I have ever met is always striving to be “better.”

Maybe some of these skills found on Genealogy Today will help you do so!

Becoming a successful family genealogist means more than just looking up your ancestors online or in records at the courthouse. To succeed at this gigantic and often frustrating endeavor without going mad you'll need some essential skills. Some of these you probably have already while others will take some time to develop.

First and foremost, you have to have a consistent plan of attack in both your research and the compilation of the facts you gather. Consistency applies to everything from note taking to numbers and dates to names ... Copy names as you find them, even if they're abbreviated, and make a note where you found them.

You'll need to get the cooperation of a lot of people in your genealogical quest. A little politeness goes a long way ...


Which skill do you consider most essential?  Was one of the listed skills something you’ve just kind of ignored in the past and won’t now?





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26 June 2012

Hatfields and McCoys -- Were Your Ancestors Ever Involved in a Feud?


Hatfield Clan in 1897


A few weeks ago, the History Channel televised its miniseries, Hatfields & McCoys which has sparked some interest in the genealogy of those families and in the area where the “action” took place as well as a “planned” tv show where living descendants can participate in a reality show.

Along the lines of “notable family feuds,” I came across this Top 10 list published by Time and another one on TopTenz.net

Besides being a "colorful" bit of history, one may find that there many court cases, newspaper columns and other type documents were generated by any feud and that can only help us as genealogists!

Is there a documented “feud” that involved your family?  If so, please share with us!




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25 June 2012

Genealogy Community Encouraged to Create a Primary Law Resources Library


The Legal Genealogist (Judy G Russell) today proposes that we as a genealogy community create a primary law resources library [do read the full article for a definition of what this means and more about the planned project]!  An understanding of the “law” is so critical to our understanding records whether it’s what is the age when one is liable for taxes, inheritance law, service to the militia or so much more, we HAVE to understand the law to understand the documentary trail of our ancestors!


... Now we’re not going to do this in any particular order (sorry, Alabama, you’re not going to come first here!) and it’ll be an occasional cataloguing that may be as often as once a week at times and less frequently when other topics — and particularly reader questions — are backlogged the way they are now.

But by the time we’re through, let’s see if, working together, we can’t come up with a comprehensive answer to the common question: what was the law then and there? If you’d like to help, please send your favorite primary law resources for your favorite states — online or brick and mortar — by email.

And just to be contrary, let’s start with Wyoming… you’d think it’d be easy, right? Not even admitted as a state until 1890. But at one time or another, parts of Wyoming were governed by no fewer than seven different territorial governments, and a bunch of different countries.


As a warm up, post a comment about what are your primary law resources for your favorite states?


For example, for North Carolina some online references (I’d have to hit the NC Archives for the on-the-ground volumes that I frequently reference before posting print resources) to primary law resources can be found at the following:
·    What have I missed for NC?





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War of 1812: Privateers



If you think your ancestor “acted” during the War of 1812 as a privateer, you want to check this website out -- War of 1812: Privateers.

Click on Great Britain, United States or Canada to see lists of the Ships and Commanders.  Under Great Britain there are also .pdf documents on Owners and Crew and if you click on ADM26 you will find a list of remittances made to relatives for those who served in the Royal Navy and is NOT limited to the War of 1812.

We are always interested to hear if you have found someone you’ve been researching!






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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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22 June 2012

NGS Re-releases Rare 1986 Audio Recording of Milton Rubincam and John Coddington


Arlington, VA, 22 JUNE 2012: During 2012, the National Genealogical Society is celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the NGS Quarterly. The past ten decades have been marked by extraordinary contributions from many scholars who have advanced the field of genealogy and whose thinking is mainly available through print media. For the NGSQ anniversary, NGS created a historical video series, Voices of Genealogy, to capture on film many of the notable genealogists of our time. As a complement to the Voices of Genealogy video series, the National Genealogical Society and Repeat Performance are re-releasing a special collectors’ audio recording of an NGS “Ask the Experts” session from the 1986 NGS Conference in the States held in Columbus, Ohio. It featured Milton Rubincam and John Insley Coddington, two of the more prominent genealogists of the previous generation.

In the NGS “Ask the Experts” recording, Rubincam and Coddington answer questions from the audience about how to research a particular problem or where to find a historical record before the availability of the Internet and search engines, such as Google. Their answers and suggestions represent the best genealogical thinking of that era and urge consideration of many issues that still plague researchers today, like the problem of incomplete indexes and the limitations of not considering enough source material. This rare audio recording is an important asset for collectors and the study of notable genealogical contributors.


Milton Rubincam (1909‒1997) was the 21st and 26th president of the National Genealogical Society. He was book review editor and assistant editor for the NGS Quarterly for many years and editor from 1957‒1962. He was chairman of the Board for Certification of Genealogists (1964–1978). He was elected an NGS Fellow in 1957 and inducted into the NGS Hall of Fame in 2003. He was also a Fellow of the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania and the Utah Genealogical Association. The 100th Anniversary issue of the NGS Quarterly, March 2012, Volume 100, Number 1, features a reprint of “The Genealogist’s Contribution to History” by Milton Rubincam.


John Insley Coddington (1902‒1991) was editor of the NGS Quarterly for three issues after Rubincam. He was elected an NGS Fellow in 1978 and inducted into the NGS Hall of Fame in 1997. He was a Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, Texas State Genealogical Society, and the Society of Genealogists of London. He was fluent in several languages and wrote over 200 articles for the NGSQ and other genealogical journals.

You can order a copy of this historic interview, “Ask the Experts” (item #COO-15), from Repeat Performance at http://www.audiotapes.com/conf.asp?ProductCon=2012 (or http://goo.gl/mY5ZP). Be sure to use the item #COO-15 when searching for this recording. It is available in three mediums: CD-ROM for $10.00, cassette tape for $8.50, or MP3 for $6.00, plus $2.00 for shipping. Shipping for additional items in the same order is $1.00 each. Or you can save the cost of shipping and download an MP3 for $5.00. There is also a link to order “Ask the Experts” on the NGS website at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.

Voices of Genealogy is a historical video archive of some of the most notable genealogists of our time, produced by award winning filmmakers Kate Geis and Allen Moore, for members of the National Genealogical Society. Many of the leading scholars in the field of genealogy discuss how they became interested in family history research, their contributions to the field, and how genealogy progressed in the twentieth century. Interviews are being released throughout 2012 in celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly and can be viewed by NGS members at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/videos_online.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.







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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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21 June 2012

Around the World in 40 Blogs


Family Tree recently posted about international blogs. With various languages, records kept, archiving, laws and much more, researching your non-US ancestors can be very challenging and exhilarating.  It’s nice to hear that there are quite a few blogs out there that can now help us as we attempt to make those “leaps” into the records of other countries and hopefully make our “landings” somewhat soft and fruitful!

If you’ve traveled abroad, you know it’s not easy to adjust to a new land. Unfamiliar languages, customs, laws, food, currency and maps can trip you up. Smart travelers often consult trusted locals on where to visit, eat and sleep.

Starting family history research in another country is like traveling there for the first time. You don’t know the nuances of record-keeping, the ins and outs of repositories, or even how to read the country’s records. It can help to have a friendly local as your guide.

Where can you find such a guide? Try the international geneablogging scene. Amateurs and experts from Argentina to Australia, British Columbia to the British Isles note their successes, tips and techniques in genealogy weblogs, or “geneablogs.” In this whirlwind world tour, we’ll introduce you to 40 fantastic international blogs, and help you find, read and use them in your research.






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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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20 June 2012

Almost 70% of the 1940 Census Has Been Indexed


In just over 2 months, almost 70% of the 1940 census has been indexed and the records for 20 states are now fully searchable!

Have you tried to find your ancestors in the 1940 census?  Have you had success?  What has been the most helpful record you have found so far?



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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"Dallas" Then and Now -- A Family Tree


It’s not too often that a tv show has a complicated family tree associated with it and with the now revived tv show Dallas. Complicated has always been “one” among many words used to describe the original long-running series!

If you don’t remember the details on the family (like I don't except for a few of the key players as I was too busy watching other tv shows at the time) or you are “new” to the family and caught the premiere last week, the Huffington Post has created the above family tree which you can see full size on its website.

Whether a fan of the show or not, what do you think of this convoluted family tree?  Do you have any family trees that are even more complicated?  Please do post any comments!





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Maryland State Archives Running Out Of Space


Image that accompanied Washington Times version of the article by Barbara L Salisbury

Archives are a wonderful place to do genealogy research!  Though, most of us probably don’t think too much about what it takes to manage an archive or what happens when an archive runs out of storage space!

This has happened in Maryland.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — The Maryland State Archives collection is among the largest in the country with nearly 400 years of history, including Colonial-era paintings, keepsakes of the state’s governors, and thousands of land, court and genealogy records.

With all that history, the Archives has run out of space.

The agency first filled its Annapolis headquarters to capacity in 2000, then leased and filled a warehouse. It leased a second warehouse and a third before brokering a deal to store some of its property at the Baltimore City Archives.

All of the facilities are now full, and state archivists have been pushing for more space since 2005...

Read the full article.

Do you know of other archives facing a similar space crunch?

When such a thing happens, what can we suggest to people in terms of where they can safely, securely and for perpetuity store their family treasures? 





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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19 June 2012

Rootstech Call for Presentations Deadline Extended to 30 June 2012




March 21-23, 2013 | Salt Lake City, Utah

The world of genealogy is changing at an ever-increasing rate through the development of new technologies. Millions of people are passionate about discovering their roots. They share an interest in learning about the latest technologies and methods to help them in this pursuit. The third annual RootsTech Conference brings together thought leaders and consumers who want to share and experience the latest trends in genealogy and technology. Building on the success and growth of previous years, RootsTech 2013 will reach thousands of participants on site and around the world. RootsTech includes engaging, interactive sessions that promote learning and the free exchange of ideas on improving the way genealogy is done. Genealogists and technologists attending this conference share a stance that is progressive and forward thinking. They are interested in the application of technology to simplify and improve the family history experience.

Unique tracks will be offered that address the specific needs of genealogists and technologists, with an emphasis on how they can more effectively work together. We invite proposals that address technology challenges and solutions that have the potential to improve family history and genealogical research. Additional consideration will be given to proposals that provide hands-on or interactive experiences, with presenters giving step-by-step approaches and live demonstrations for using technology for genealogy, including tips and helps for using software, hardware, standards, APIs, plug-ins, etc. Since RootsTech is designed as an interactive conference, traditional lectures depending entirely on text-based slides are discouraged.

Possible sessions for genealogists include:

·    Solutions for saving, accessing and sharing data
·    Publishing and sharing family history online
·    Tools for online collaboration and community projects
·    Using popular applications for family history
·    Reaching and engaging new genealogists through technology
·    Online sites and services for getting started

Possible sessions for developers include: 
·    GPS and geo-mapping ancestral locations
·    Applications for mobile devices
·    Social applications
·    Standards and APIs
·    Records imaging and tree visualization
·    Gamification of family history experiences
·    Cloud-based solutions for saving, accessing, and sharing data

Submissions are due by June 30, 2012, with an extended deadline of October 15, 2012 for limited, late-breaking technology research submissions.

Types of Sessions
1. Presentations: Classroom settings that engage participants.
2. Panels or Discussions: Formal panels of experts discussing specific topics, led by a facilitator.
3. Hands-on Workshops: Labs where attendees have hands-on experience in a specific task or objective.
4. Unconferencing: Informal, participant-led discussion groups.

Submission Information
Proposals will be accepted online at rootstech.org from May 9, 2012 through June 30, 2012.  Syllabus materials will be due from participating presenters on October 1, 2012 (other than late-breaking proposals).
Presenters participating in the RootsTech Conference will receive a complimentary conference registration and a syllabus. There is no monetary compensation for presenters at this conference. Out-of-state speakers selected to present three or more lectures will also receive hotel accommodations.



Editors Note: NGS is one of the proud sponsors of Rootstech.



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Did You Celebrate Juneteenth Today?


source: http://challengercn.com/wp-content/uploads2/2012/06/juneteenth1.jpg


Today is Juneteenth!  Did you celebrate?

This CNN Travel piece (Juneteenth: Where to honor the end of slavery) talks about some of the history and the events celebrating this milestone.

Check out these videos posted on the MPR (Minnesota Public Radio) website.


The internet is filled with news of Juneteenth events around the country.  Did you attend one?  If so, please give a shout out to where it was and what made it so great!



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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Think your friends, colleagues, or fellow genealogy researchers would find this blog post interesting? If so, please let them know that anyone can read past UpFront with NGS posts or subscribe!
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