22 February 2016

Mapping the African American Past (MAAP) uses Maps (modern and historic)

Mapping the African American Past is a delightful way to get immersed in NYC’s African American Past.

Mapping the African American Past (MAAP) is a public website created to enhance the appreciation and study of significant sites and moments in the history of African Americans in New York from the early 17th-century through the recent past. The website is a geographic learning environment, enabling students, teachers, and visitors to browse a multitude of locations in New York and read encyclopedic profiles of historical people and events associated with these locations. The site is further enhanced by selected film and music clips; digitized photographs, documents, and maps from Columbia University's libraries; and commentary from Columbia faculty and other specialists.

Since African American history is a required component in the New York State social studies curriculum for certain grades, the side also has a selection of Lesson Plans.

As expected, this got me interested in seeing if there were other projects using maps and more to preserve and convey African American history.  Some finds include:



Are you aware of other projects which provide a visually rich gateway into learning about local African American history using maps?





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