26 July 2016

You Can Now Easily Convert B&W Photos to Color Ones for FREE!



You Can Now Easily Convert B&W Photos to Color Ones for FREE!

I don’t know about you and I don’t have a lot of time to play around with image modification software.  I have a couple of basic programs on my computer that I use to crop images with. I sometimes play with contrast or erasing bits from an image and that is about the extent of my dabbling in photo modifications. 

Photoshop and other more sophisticated software is above my pay grade as they say!

Recently, I learned about a FREE & easy-to-use website based option for converting B&W images to color ones via Colourize your photos instantly with this free tool. You can access the tool directly via Colorize Photos (Algorithmia).

You can either put in the URL for an image or upload an image.

Of course, I had to play around with it.  I learned quickly that you don’t want to try it on muddied B&W images.  I have some old images that were photocopied (back in the day) and then scanned and those just won’t work.

I next tried some B&W postcards from the NC, starting with one for Andrew Johnson’s Birthplace.  See the result at the top of this post.  The changes weren’t dramatic and given a wood house and a tree, probably be close to what it did look like in 1905 (the date on this postcard). I next tried it on The Magnolia (another postcard from the same year) with a little more dramatic outcome.



I never got quite the result I was hoping for.  Though, I really couldn’t spend all day playing around with it.  Maybe you’ll have better success.

Be careful though, it is addicting!



What did you think?

If you had great success, please share!

What other easy-to-use means of converting B&W photos to color do you know of?








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