29 March 2013

Upfront Mini Bytes


Upfront Mini Bytes

Welcome to the fifth edition of our bi-weekly feature Upfront Mini Bytes.  In Upfront Mini Bytes we will provide eight tasty bits of genealogy news that will help give you a deeper byte into your family history research. Each item is short and sweet.  We encourage you to check out the links to articles, blog posts, resources, and anything genealogical!

We hope you found the first edition, second edition, third edition and fourth edition helpful.

Do you have questions, suggestions for future posts, or comments?  Please post a comment or send an e-mail to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org.

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As we go forward, words and phrases, which were previously common, become obsolete.  Such will be the case with the term Negro. Starting next year (2014) the U.S. Census Bureau Drops 'Negro' From Surveys. Are there other ethnic terms once used in Federal records that are no longer found?

http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/online-archive-egyptian-stamps-launched
Back in the day I used to collect stamps.  Though my stamp collection has long been donated to a philatelic society, I still love to look at stamps.  I found them such a fascinating glimpse into the countries around the world.  How detailed and intricate some were, how pretty others were, and how some honored historical figures while others honored the head of state.  And, deciphering the language and correlating how a country called itself on a stamp to what it was in English took me around the world many times. I was reminded of this past hobby when I read Online archive for Egyptian stamps is launched. Remember that stamps, post office, post marks, handwriting, addresses, and much more as connected to a simple piece of mail can tell you a lot about the parties involved!

Chinese genealogical research can be challenging.  With such different language, customs, and heritage, it can be slow going.  Check out Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems -- Family Tree Relationships – It’s Complicated (Chinese Genealogy) for some neat tips on researching Chinese ancestry. Do check out the video that accompanies the article.

Having tracked a few lines on my husband’s side through Wales, I was quite excited to hear, via British GENES, Welsh Newspapers Online up and running. The website, from the National Library of Wales, is at http://welshnewspapers.llgc.org.uk/en/ and is free to access with articles available to search from 1844-1910. I guess I have no excuse not to revisit those Welsh ancestors!

Over the last few years we have family history themed programming, such as Who Do You Think You Are? (WDYTYA), Finding Your Roots, Faces of America, and much more.  Well, this phenomenon is not limited to the UK (original source for WDYTYA) and the US.  A Swedish Reality Show will soon be starting its third year. “Allt For Sverige flies 10 Americans to Sweden for a six-week excursion that traces the contestants’ Swedish heritage.” Read more about a recent winner and the show in MN Woman Discovers Heritage in Swedish Reality Show. Upfront with NGS recently posted about Arkdigital, a subscription service for Swedish Records.

Just because a website operates a subscription service doesn’t mean that there is not free content available – articles on research topics, select databases, etc.  Here are some subscription genealogy and family history research sites that offer FREE content: ProGenealogists, Archives.com, American Ancestors (NEHGS), and Fold3 (look for word FREE), just to name a few.  Additionally, many of the subscription services will offer FREE access to select databases as certain historical events are celebrated.  Join their mailing lists and receive news of such offerings.

Are you celebrating the War of 1812?  Are you on Facebook (FB)?  If so, check out this page: Preserving War of 1812 Pensions. The focus is not just on preserving the War of 1812 pensions.  You will find information on all kinds of upcoming events and newly published media (video, books, etc) regarding this conflict.

More newspaper news!  ProQuest to Distribute NewspaperARCHIVE to Libraries Worldwide.  This is an excellent newspaper database.  You can have limited free access via the site – 10 views a day.  Or, a subscription to Godfrey includes full access to NewspaperARCHIVE, 19th Century Newspapers, and other databases.  And, having access via your local library would be the cat’s meow.  Hopefully some other newspaper content distributors who limit their collections to universities and colleges will expand the availability of their digitized newspaper collections.  A genealogist can only hope!



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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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28 March 2013

National Genealogical Society Call for Papers Deadline is 1 April 2013 for the 2014 Family History Conference in Richmond, Virginia


Contact: Erin Shifflett
Phone: 703-525-0050
E-Mail: eshifflett@ngsgenealogy.org                      
For Release: 28 March 2013


ARLINGTON, VA, 28 MARCH 2013: Speakers as well as organizations interested in sponsoring lectures or tracks are invited to submit lecture proposals by 1 April 2013 for the NGS 2014 Family History Conference, Virginia: The First Frontier, to be held 7–10 May 2014 in Richmond, Virginia. Building on the records and history that draw so many back to their roots in the Old Dominion, we will explore the origins of those who settled within Virginia’s borders whether they came by land or sea.

Among the topics being considered are lectures on the history, records, repositories, and ethnic and religious groups of Virginia and neighboring states including Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee with special emphasis on migrations into, within, and out of the region down the Carolina and Great Wagon Roads, over the Appalachian Mountains, and across the south to Texas and beyond. Other regional topics of interest include the origins of the early settlers, land and military records (especially the French and Indian, Revolutionary, and Civil wars). Proposals are also solicited for the broader genealogical categories including federal records, the law as it relates to genealogy, methodology, analysis and problem solving, and the use of technology including genetics, mobile devices, and apps in genealogical research.

Interested individuals and organizations should follow published guidelines at the NGS website, http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/call_for_papers.

Speakers may submit up to eight proposals electronically through the NGS website, http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/submit_your_proposal, no later than 1 April 2013.   

Organizations wishing to sponsor a lecture or track of lectures should review the details and sponsor requirements at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/sponsor_a_session. The deadline to submit sponsored lectures is also 1 April 2013.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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27 March 2013

National Genealogical Society Presents Research in Washington, DC 3–9 November 2013


Contact: Patricia Walls Stamm, CGTM, CGLTM
Phone: (703) 525-0050
researchtrips@ngsgenealogy.org         
For Release: 27 March 2013



Arlington, VA, 27 March 2013: The National Genealogical Society will be presenting a hands-on research trip to Washington, DC, from 3–9 November 2013. Under the guidance of Craig Roberts Scott, cg, and Patricia Walls Stamm, cg, cgl, twenty-six researchers will use the genealogical resources at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Library, and the Library of Congress (LOC).


The Research Package includes:
  • Six days of research at three noteworthy Washington, DC, facilities (the National Archives, the Library of Congress, and the Daughters of the American Revolution Library)
  • Online Training and Preparation Assistance for the 2013 Washington, DC, Research Trip
  • Orientation and dessert get-together on Sunday at the hotel
  • Research consultations with leaders throughout the trip
  • Friday evening group meal
  • Six nights at the Holiday Inn Rosslyn, which includes daily continental breakfast, free Internet in rooms, and parking.
  • Fees and taxes included

Costs do not include either the transportation to Washington, DC, or within the city, or any other meals other than those shown above. The package price varies depending upon room occupancy and National Genealogical Society membership status. Payment is required in full at the time of registration. Costs are as follows:

Registration Fees
Member
Non-Member
Double/Shared Room
Before 16 August
16 August and after

$   900
$1,400

$1,200
$1,700
Single Room
Before 16 August
16 August and after

$1,100
$1,500

$1,400
$1,800
Person with
non-researching spouse*
Before 16 August
16 August and after

$1,400
$1,600

$1,600
$1,800
*non-researching spouse receives the benefits of the orientation, daily continental breakfast, and Friday evening group meal.

The trip hosts, Craig Roberts Scott, cgSM, and Patricia Walls Stamm, cgSM, cglSM, will be joined by Shirley Langdon Wilcox, cgSM, fngs, and Patricia O’Brien Shawker, cgSM. All are seasoned experts in conducting research in Washington, DC, facilities.

Craig Roberts Scott, cgSM, is a professional genealogist specializing in records in the National Archives, Washington, DC, since 1985. He has written several books and articles that relate to research in the National Archives. He has lectured at National Genealogical Society and the Federation of Genealogical Societies national conferences since 1990. Craig has coordinated and lectured in the military records tracks at Samford University’s Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR) and the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG). He continues to lecture around the country on military records and problem solving. He has served on the Board of the Association of Professional Genealogists for several terms. Craig is also the president and CEO of Heritage Books, Inc.

Patricia Walls Stamm, cgSM, cglSM, serves as the Education Manager of the National Genealogical Society. Pat lectures on a wide variety of topics at many of the National Genealogical Society and the Federation of Genealogical Societies national conferences. She is a graduate of the National Institute on Genealogical Research (NIGR) and the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR). Pat is an instructor at Samford University’s Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR), St. Louis Community College, and the St. Louis Genealogical Society.


Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, VA-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.  Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.


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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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26 March 2013

Black People DID Own Slaves? Yes ....

As with any bit of history, there is complexity.

People like to think that only “white” plantation owners owned and used enslaved labor.  People like to think that it was only “white males” who fathered children with enslaved female negroes.  The list could go on.

The article, Did Black People Own Slaves? by Henry Louis Gates Jr (at The Root) reminds us that they did.  This challenges us to be open-minded when looking into the records of who owned slaves and why – both in terms of who, where, when, why, etc.  The history is complex and the repercussions have been long-lasting.


Some other articles on the same topic are:



Were your ancestors enslaved by a black owner?

Have you been challenged to determine the “race” of who owned your ancestors?





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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25 March 2013

Five Great Productivity Tools for Genealogy

As genealogists, we are always looking to see how to squeeze more information out of a piece of data and more hours out of the day!

As our research world is impacted by technology and web-based services and related, it is important for us to try and keep up with tools (whether designed with genealogists and family historians in mind or not) that help us as we do our research, whether they help us be more thorough, more efficient, etc.

Until I read the post at GenealogyInTime Magazine Five Great Productivity Tools for Genealogy. I wasn’t even aware of the service called NameChk (read the article to find out what this service can do for you!).

The great thing is that these are generally available tools whose function is not limited to genealogy research.

On a related note, check out these Upfront with NGS posts on other tech tools that might be of help:




What productivity or tech tools have you found that really help you be a better genealogy and family history researcher?




03/25/2013 3pm EST -- fixed broken links
03/25/2013 4pm EST -- removed image; used without permission of author + attribution stated to be correct though it is the source where the image was acquired

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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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22 March 2013

Rootstech – Recorded Sessions Archived & Syllabus are online – All FREE



More Rootstech News ... just because you can't attend in person, doesn't mean that you can't participate!

1. Missed a streamed session, watch the recorded version.  The Thursday streamed/recorded sessions are now available and others will be as they occur.
2. Can’t attend and want the hand-outs, access the syllabus! It is organized by day, then session and you have the option of either a .pdf or .doc version for each one

It doesn’t get easier than this to “attend” this massive conference from your living room or while wearing your pajamas!



What streamed session did you find most useful?

Which handout in the syllabus gave you some new and/or neat info?




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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Tips on Researching Institutionalized Ancestors

Source: http://cantonasylumforinsaneindians.com/history_blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Waupaca.jpg


Kathleen Brandt (a3Genealogy) posted a piece titled Tips on Researching Institutionalized Ancestors  Do read her post as well as the provided comments.

I have written about my one “known” insane ancestor who became a “mad hatter” and for whom I have seen a postmortem photograph of. Postmorten photography at the turn of the 20th century.

Some related articles you might check out:


Have you successfully researched an institutionalized ancestor?

Do you have your own tips for researching those who have been institutionalized?





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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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21 March 2013

RootsTech 2013 Announces FREE Web Streaming Starting TODAY!



The conference starts TODAY and will broadcast 13 of its 250+ classes live at RootsTech.org, including the daily keynote speakers.

“Not everyone can attend RootsTech in person,” said Dan Martinez, RootsTech conference marketer. “So we give them a chance to virtually attend a free sampling of some of our most popular sessions live online.” Martinez added that the live webcasts in 2012 had 50,000 views during the show.

For more details and the full schedule check out this post on FamilySearch.




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copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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20 March 2013

What Would You Do With a Genealogy Time Machine?

Source: http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20090502052215/timemachine/images/4/45/The_Time_Machine.jpg

Lorine McGinnis Schulze (The Olive Tree Genealogy) posted a piece titled What Would You Do With a Genealogy Time Machine?  Do read her post (and the conditions for using the time machine) as well as the provided comments.

Though it is tempting to try and solve a brick wall (of which there are many), I think that since my family has always been a bit geographically dispersed and small, I would personally focus more on recent generations.  Additionally, I would rather see a bunch of little events and snippets of life than spend too much time with one person or family.  After all, I only have 24 hours!

That said, my 24 hours might look like this ... obviously, I’d have to be more specific if I ever did get access to a time machine and this is good enough for my hypothetical plan!

2 hrs   
Oldham (UK) -- see my mom perform in a play as a teen (I’ve only seen newspaper clippings)
2 hrs   
Oldham (UK) -- see my mom play piano (I’ve only heard that she was excellent)
2 hrs
Salem MA – see my dad “win” the race where the photographer captured his glory
2 hrs
Salem MA -- see my grandmother, grandfather and father when he was about 2 (his father died soon after and it would be nice to meet my grandfather and also see my grandmother when she was happy) (my father was an only son of an only son of an only son)
2 hrs
Somewhere along the Polish border – see my paternal great grandfather during one of the several attempts he made to leave the country before he was successful
2 hrs
Desno or Wola Pietrusza (Poland) – visit one of the ancestral towns of my Galician ancestors, just before they emigrated to the US
2 hrs
Salem MA –spent some time with my paternal great grandmother before she died in the influenza epidemic of 1918
2 hrs
Ylistaro (Finland) – visit the Kujanpaa farm before my other paternal great grandfather fell through the ice
2 hrs
Chadderton (UK) – visit the coal mine where a distant relative worked (I’d have to look up the details for this one first)
2 hrs
Hollinwood (UK) – spend some time with the Taylors and Wolfendens and their hatting business
2 hrs
Somewhere in the Atlantic, c. 1900-1910 – travel with either a Kujanpaa or Rajala or Blom from Finland or a Barna or Malecki from Galicia
2 hrs
UK – attend one of the Nelson family reunions, when the patriarch George Nelson was alive and ask that man about his father (okay – so, I put one brick wall item in my list )

And, what would you do if you had a Genealogy Time Machine?





~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
copyright © National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, Virginia 22204-4370. http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.
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Want to learn more about interacting with the blog, please read Hyperlinks, Subscribing and Comments -- How to Interact with Upfront with NGS Blog posts!
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NGS does not imply endorsement of any outside advertiser or other vendors appearing in this blog.
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Republication of UpFront articles is permitted and encouraged for non-commercial purposes without express permission from NGS. Please drop us a note telling us where and when you are using the article. Express written permission is required if you wish to republish UpFront articles for commercial purposes. You may send a request for express written permission to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org. All republished articles may not be edited or reworded and must contain the copyright statement found at the bottom of each UpFront article.
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